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John Paul II - Essay Example

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High school
Author : clementinejast
Essay
Religion and Theology
Pages 6 (1506 words)

Summary

Pope John Paul II was very much a person of reform. The following will look at one area of his progressive ideas which is known as the 'new evangelization' (NE). It will be argued in the following that the goal of this was to incorporate some of the ideas of the growing Evangelical movement in Christianity, and to widen the appeal of the Church as a consequence…

Extract of sample
John Paul II

While the NE is a doctrine and set of ideas that was put forward by John Paul II in the early 1990's, the roots of this belong in the establishment of the Second Vatican Council (1962) and in documents like the LUMEN GENTIUM (1964)[1]. In the broadest terms, it can be said that the Second Vatican Council or Vatican II was the Catholic Church's attempt to adapt and assimilate some of modernity or modernism. For instance, one of the changes or transformations that most Catholics are likely aware of, is that Mass is no longer required to be in Latin. The significance of this historically is rather rich. The very Reformation which split the Catholic Church in the Sixteen Century, partially happened because of a new movement to bring the Bible into the vernacular or to the language of the people [2]. And, while the Bible had made it into the languages that common people spoke many centuries earlier, Mass continued to be conducted in Latin until 1962: "Since these duties, so very necessary to the life of the Church, can be fulfilled only with difficulty in many regions in accordance with the discipline of the Latin Church as it exists today" [3]. ...
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