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The Dignity of Human Life in Relation to Political Life and State Violence: War and the Death Penalty - Essay Example

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The Dignity of Human Life in Relation to Political Life and State Violence: War and the Death Penalty Religion and violence have a long time relationship particularly in the context of violence and Christianity, the relationship may seem to be highly contentious…

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The Dignity of Human Life in Relation to Political Life and State Violence: War and the Death Penalty

However, the current scenario in the world presents an unfortunate state of injustice where every now and then human beings are killed on the name of God. In the light of justice, the death of Jesus could be analyzed with respect to the interaction between violence and religious faiths as evident in the modern society. Understanding of Jesus’ life, death and resurrection in relation with God’s justice: If the death of Jesus is questioned, mostly God would be mentioned as the sole reason emphasizing on the fact that the death was meant for God. Many theorists did not even focus on the issue of a devil’s presence in the act of Jesus’ death. It can be realized that the human beings in general are all responsible in the death of Jesus being parts of the sinful crime that killed him. While Jesus reflected on the supremacy of God, human beings, including the people from Rome and assisted by religious authorities from Jerusalem and many others who cried for his death supported the merciless killing of Jesus. Theorists believe that resurrection is the primacy of God that had the capability to prove conquering over all evil powers of the human forces. Humans have been major participants in the veil power reflected in the death of Jesus, and till date human being could be seen to be parts of militarism, nationalism, racism, sexism, heterosexism and poverty. ...
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