Norse Religion and Mythology - Research Paper Example

Only on StudentShare

Extract of sample
Norse Religion and Mythology

This mythology is the study of the Germanic myths (Iceland, Germany, Norway, Sweden, Faroe Islands and Denmark). The Norse societies later adopted Christianity because the Norse religion was not as strong as other religions. Lindow says that this mythology developed slowly over the years and the importance of different heroes and gods kept varying with time and place (45). They worshipped different gods and did not have any proper organization, as religion was not institutionalized. The absence of priests and temples meant that religion was part of their ordinary lives as they could worship from anywhere they wanted. The Gods and Goddesses of the Norse Religion
The Gods and Goddesses of the Norse religion were divided into two major categories: the Vanir and Aesir. The former were referred to as the Earth Gods and symbolized fecundity, riches and fertility. They controlled the earth and the sea and had to be consulted on everything that falls in this category. The most important gods in this category are Freyr, Freya, Njord and Aegir. ...
Download paper

Summary

The Norse mythology is part of the wider Germanic Mythology and it flourished before the Scandinavian countries were Christianized. This mythology refers to the legends, beliefs and myths of the Norse Pagans’ supernatural beings. …
Author : predovicviviane

Related Essays

Religion
This creates the essence for various rituals, libations, cultures, behaviors and lifestyle as observed by different religious traditions. It is worth noting, the fact that there is no single religious tradition that can claim to have fully understood this mystery of the origin of life. This has created superstitious values systems and opinions that have eventually seen these traditional religions differ, based on locality, intellectual background and levels as well as on human tribes and races. Religion, as stated by Harvey (2000) is “any form of belief, about deity, often involving rituals,...
2 pages (502 words) Essay
Comparative Religion
There have been in the religious discourse, plenty of theories and theoretical paradigms pertaining to the need, purpose and the importance of religion in the lives of the people who follow them. Some of these theories are worth noting. For instance, James Frazer (pp. 232-246), an anthropologist of evolutionary school of thought, places religion in a nonlinear hierarchical evolutionary ladder in which, the first step is magic followed by religion and subsequently by science. He argues that the earlier people were not aware of the ‘real’ reasons behind the natural processes and so, came up...
14 pages (3514 words) Essay
Religion - World Religion
In the famous section of katha Upanishads, “the simile of the chariot,” an analogy of the chariot is used to reveal the nature of atman as I (self). This has been made possible through equation of the chariot to the body; here the body has been depicted as only as a carrier that will need so many other aspect to function well. The body is equated as independent, however, dependent to function, minds have been equated to the reins; in this passage, they depict the minds as the aspects that are on the control. Intellect has been equated to the captain or director of the chariot and the owner...
6 pages (1506 words) Essay
Religion
This comprehensive definition is very good because it covers the complex social dimension that this word implies. In the movie Grand Canyon, for example, certain characters appear who intervene to avert disaster. It is possible to see those characters as angels, using a Judaeo Christian religious paradigm, or as reincarnated ancestors using an animist paradigm, as elements of pure chance using an atheistic paradigm, or just as tools to move the plot along using a film studies paradigm. Each alternative reveals a different aspect of these characters. The concept of a paradigm shift refers to...
2 pages (502 words) Essay
Religion
This is contrary to the unbelievers who are slaves of the law; hence, all their earthly undertakings put them “under the law” (Romans 6:15). According to Paul, humanity does not become righteous through adhering to the statutes, but by accepting Christ where one has to die into sin. This is because God’s elect are not subject to the law and it only addresses those who are unbelievers. Paul mentions Abraham as an example of righteous people where the creator addressed him because of his incomparable faith in Him, but not keeping the law (Romans 3:28). Therefore, Paul utilizes this...
3 pages (753 words) Essay
Religion
These religions command people to show kindness to fellow human beings as well as to animals. MORALS, PERFECTION – The followers of the three East Asian religions, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto, concentrate mainly on being a perfect human being and upholding moral behavior. Each of these has a humanist philosophy. MONOTHEISM, BOOK – The common features of the religions Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are that both believe in one God and both are religions of the book. The latter means that a book was sent to the people of all these religions through their prophets. Generally speaking,...
3 pages (753 words) Essay
The Chinese dragon and its influence on Christianity in China
Generally, dragons have held positive connotations in culture of the Chinese since the time of the Song dynasty, in AD 960-1279. The Chinese made prayers to the dragon for rain. In Chinese culture, the dragon has been used as a symbol of imperial power; in fact, the emperor wore a dragon robe, reigned from a dragon throne and was thought to be a dragon incarnation (Yang 28-29). After several centuries, the dragon was chosen by the then Chinese Emperor Qing, to represent the Chinese nation. The dragon is apparently, today the most favourable of zodiac animals in china; the dragons perform...
4 pages (1004 words) Essay
Got a tricky question? Receive an answer from students like you! Try us!