Sikh Gurus, Sacred Scripture, Sacred Institutions

Sikh Gurus, Sacred Scripture, Sacred Institutions Research Paper example
Research Paper
Religion and Theology
Pages 8 (2008 words)
Download 0
Name Instructor Course November 30, 2011 Sikh Gurus, Sacred Scripture, Sacred Institutions Nothing is more sacred to the Sikh than the Guru Granth, their holy scriptures, which contain the poems and songs of Guru Nanak and Gurus in his line of succession. In Sikh places of worship, the Guru Granth is kept on a throne, wrapped in robes, beneath a canopy, with someone to fan the air around it at all times, with a yak tail.


All Sikhs are deeply connected to the Guru Granth, and it is considered to be the Guru, and thus to be the immediate revelation and manifestation of God (Mann 41). How scripture became the Guru and how each Guru participated in scripture, and the institutions that resulted from this process, is a very interesting story. The way God spoke to the Sikhs was through their Gurus. The Gurus wrote songs and recitations of devotion and supplication, in poetic form, and these were passed on to subsequent Gurus of the lineage. The Guru Granth is comprised of the collection of poetry and songs, dating all the way back to the respected Guru Nanak, the first Guru of the Sikhs (Mann). The scripture is an active part of daily living, for the Sikhs, and is the center for rites of passage in Sikh family celebrations (Mann 42) Guru Nanak taught an emancipator path of liberation from the cycle of rebirth, based upon the humble and joyous adoration of God. God was macrocosm and microcosm, and could not be fully known nor manipulated, but might freely bestow his grace. Guru Nanak, glimpsing the transcendent, sang poetry to God: I would still not be able to measure your greatness, nor signify the glory of your name. Another example is: To you belong my breath, to you my flesh. ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?