In Paul's letter to the Galatians, what kind of freedom is he talking about if it makes you a slave? (5:13). What might this fre

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Jerry Ciacho December 4, 2011 Paul’s Letter to the Galatians: The Meaning of Freedom In Paul’s letter to the Galatians, particularly in chapter five, it talks about having freedom in Christ and gaining life through the Holy Spirit. It also delves into the meaning of freedom from slavery or bondage against the law and against sin…

Introduction

They were in danger of going back to the bondage that had, on one occasion, dominated and oppressed them.  Paul wrote tough strong words to caution and warn the people not to let themselves return to bondage because the power that seizes a person in slavery is not only very devious and very clever, it is also very tempting and very great. This power can even imitate and pretend to be an angel of the light. False teachers and false disciples were misleading the Galatians. They wanted them to go back to bondage, to slavery. They were attempting to achieve this by indicating that, "the way of bondage is the way to righteousness."  Paul goes in a fight against these fake "ministers of righteousness" through the heavenly inspired and stirred words of the Holy Spirit given to him. Paul declares that these false teachers and men who claim to be God’s disciples had "perverted the gospel of Christ."  The Galatians indeed were very lucky and fortunate to have Paul as their supporter as he was very passionate about bringing the people back to God and truly cared for their souls. Without a doubt, numerous hearts went back and returned to the confidence and trust in Christ, guaranteeing their liberty from bondage. ...
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