Summary of the Key Points in "Buddhism and Christiniaty"

Summary of the Key Points in "Buddhism and Christiniaty" Assignment example
Masters
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Religion and Theology
Pages 4 (1004 words)
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BUDDHISM AND CHRISTIANITY Key Points Summary Date: 1100 words Name: Institution: Abe and Ives chapters 3-8 and Rejoinder In the third chapter of the book ‘Divine Emptiness and Historical Fullness’, Heinrich explores Masao Abe’s comparison of Christianity and Buddhism…

Introduction

On the other hand, Christianity better understands the ‘Sunyata’, a Buddhism principle. The point of clarity achieved is crucial in resisting Nihilism and scientism forms of religion2. Abe arrives at a point of clarity where the core of religion does not fall in doctrine but in contact with reality. The writer demystifies emptiness and nothingness as understood in traditional Christianity and western culture. According to Abe, Suchness becomes possible only in the realm of emptiness. Nothingness becomes a thing by itself3. Marjorie continues to expound the relationship between Buddhism and Christianity in the fourth chapter of the book. In his understanding, Marjorie expounds Abe’s view of God as everlasting self-emptying phenomena4. Just like Heinrich, in the third chapter, Marjorie demystifies the western approach that takes God as an ultimate self and thus contradicting Sunyata principle. To get our own profound understanding, the writer also emphasizes that there is a great need to study other religions5. The writer comes to a point of agreement with Abe on the principle of otherness. The writer affirms Abe’s work on Trinity and Sunyata. Sunyata can only achieve its emptying by embracing true otherness. Marjorie closes his argument by citing that dialogue should not aim at converting. It creates room for enrichment and a fuller understanding of the others, and consequently us. ...
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