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Paul's Letters on Christ's Death - Essay Example

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High school
Author : jhoeger
Essay
Religion and Theology
Pages 4 (1004 words)

Summary

Paul’s Letters on Christ’s Death This paper is a reflection on St. Paul’s teaching on Christ’s death, as the core of Christian faith and way-of-living. It is believed that the Christian communities in Philippi and Corinth were both greatly influenced, if not originally formed by St…

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Paul's Letters on Christ's Death

(New American Bible, p. 300). While the nucleus of the community was Jewish, Paul’s affinity with the Greek-Roman culture would contribute to his success in converting gentiles to the new religious faith. (Jerusalem Bible, p. 251). In time, this Christian community would be recognized as being the first Christian community in Europe. (New American Bible, p. 300). At this instance, Paul has sent them a spiritual message while warning them against Jewish teachers, who have caused jealousies and rivalries. Paul was firm on his principle: These teachers are “enemies of the cross of Christ” (Phi: 3-18). He would also stress that beyond ritualistic practices, what is important is their being favored to believe in Christ. Then he pleads for unity and humility, even as Christ, he says, “humbled himself, becoming obedient to death” (Phi: 3-8). In the end, he asks for their being true, honorable, just, and pure living in order to earn God’s peace while awaiting the return of the Risen Savior. First Letter to Corinthians At about the year 51 CE, Paul organized a Christian community in Corinth among the city’s poor and underprivileged. (New American Bible, p. 242). ...
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