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Karma - Essay Example

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College
Author : opurdy
Essay
Religion and Theology
Pages 3 (753 words)

Summary

Dr. Bert Strange Religion 201-W05 Chandra Nelson 25 September 2012 Karma Karma is referred to as the results from someone’s actions. The results come naturally without the influence of any human being. In most cases, karma is associated with punishing people with bad behavior…

Extract of sample
Karma

It is an origin of ancient India used by religions. These religions included Hindu, Buddhist and Jain. In a religious view, karma is sometimes viewed as a way of punishing wrong doers. In the modern century, karma has lost its sensitivity as many people only believe in justice through legal bodies or revenge. Psychologists argue that this is caused by the lack of sensitivity and religious roots in the society. In India religions like Hindu, Buddhist and Jain hold significance sensitivity when it comes to karma. This paper will focus on the perspective of karma depending by the three religions. Additionally, the paper will highlight the difference between the beliefs associated with karma from the three religions. The nature of karma in Hinduism Hinduism strongly associates karma with God. This is the factor that makes differentiate their belief from Jain and Buddhism. In the latter religions, karma is not associated with any deity as everyone is believed to reap the effects of their actions in one way or another. In Hinduism karma is either a blessing or curse from God. Hinduism also has a perception that karma is not a punishment from God but is the resultant of someone’s action. Additionally, karma is generated and executed from the will of God. Karma in Hindu is executed by the slogan I you sow goodness you will reap goodness but if you sow wickedness you will reap wickedness. ...
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