Black Stork Essay example
Religion and Theology
Pages 4 (1004 words)
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Name Date Professor’s Name Course Section/# Black Stork and Its Implications for the Acceptance of Eugenics As a result of Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution near the end of the 1800’s, people began to take his ideas and run them to their logical conclusions.


It was the belief of those that ascribed to this type of world view that such a human was possible and the only thing that was stopping the further evolution of mankind was societal constructs of mercy and value towards all life equally. The proponents of the eugenics movement, Dr. Harry J. Haiselden himself a member, advocated for a more direct approach towards achieving this particular interpretation of Darwin’s theories (Pernick, 1996). The rational for this particular worldview was not formed from a state of mind that espoused hatred, malice, or contempt for human life; instead, the proponents of eugenics sought to create an idealistic world in which society would no longer be plagued by disease, and genetic disorders – a world in which a superhuman would eventually emerge. As such, opponents to the eugenics movement quickly crystallized around the belief and notion that all human life was sacred and it was not for the doctor/attending physician or anyone else for that matter to deem what life was not worthy of being saved through his own inaction allow an infant to die (Voluntary Euthanasia, 1932). As such, in 1919 a silent movie entitled Black Stork began to be shown in the then rare theaters. The movie was concentric around the actions/inactions of Dr. Harry J. Haiselden which led to the deaths of many infants the doctor deemed unworthy of life. ...
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