Discuss critically Paul's treat of grace in chapter 6 of Romans.

Discuss critically Paul
Masters
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Religion and Theology
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PAUL'S TREAT OF GRACE IN CHAPTER 6 OF ROMANS Name Class: Lecturer: Institution: Address: Date: Paul's Treat of Grace in Chapter 6 of Romans Introduction In Romans chapter 6, Paul addresses sin against grace. The chapter is based on how Christians struggle with sin…

Introduction

The epistle thus introduces grace based on the fact that human beings and sin are acquaintances, yet there is salvation that comes from the grace of God, but it is a choice. In this chapter, Paul acknowledges that sin has to be absolved by God for one to have a chance in eternal life, but it is not mandatory that grace is offered, yet it does not give one a free pass to the sweetness of sin. Based in Paul’s approach to grace and sin, the latter is quite compelling and is associated with a life that has earthly pleasures, which should not be what a Christian aspires due to the repercussions that are associated with engaging in the acts that contradict the life of a Christian and Christianity principles1. Analysis The introduction of grace in the Christian life is based on the choices an individual makes. Sin as described by Paul is unavoidable and Christians shall find themselves in it, but through grace, a Christian can be saved from sin and gain eternal life. The chapter addresses sin as a life of slavery and Paul goes on to further states that without proper knowledge and insight, it would be impossible to live a life devoid of sin. The epistle faults humanity and introduces the element of human weakness in saying that “we are dead to that master” (6: 7& 8), which is a life of sin. ...
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