Recovery Hydrogen sulphide from Oil Refinery an enviroeconomic study

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Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S), often referred to as 'sewer gas' is a highly noxious, corrosive and poisonous compound consisting of two atoms of hydrogen and one of sulfur, gaseous in its natural state. It is found in manufactured gas made from coals or oils containing sulphur .


Additionally, the iron sulfide can cause upsets in treating systems and plugging in disposal wells. Aside from its corrosive nature, H2S is also a very toxic and very flammable gas. At low levels, H2S has a "rotten egg" smell. At levels of 100 ppm, H2S will paralyze the olfactory system, making it appear odorless. At levels above 700 ppm, H2S can kill instantly. To add to the threat this creates, H2S is heavier than air, allowing it to creep along the surface where it becomes a potentially life threatening, explosive hazard. Therefore it is extremely important to extract this compound from refineries for safety of humans and expensive machinery.
However, Hydrogen Sulphide also has some significant uses. The most important industrial use of hydrogen sulfide is as a source of about 25% of the world production of elemental sulphur. The manufacturing process is based on burning about 1/3 of hydrogen sulfide to sulphur dioxide, then letting the resulting SO2 react with H2S. Other uses are in metallurgy for the preparation of metallic sulfides. It also finds use in preparation of phosphors and oil additives, in separation of metals, removal of metallic impurities, and in organic chemical synthesis. Hydrogen sulfide is also used in nuclear engineering, in the Girdler Sulfide process of manufacturing heavy water.
The primary source of H2S is the Desulfovibrio sulfide reducing bacteria (SR ...
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