The British Broadcasting Corporation

Case Study
Pages 20 (5020 words)
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Fondly referred to by the British as "the Beeb", "Auntie", or "Auntie Beeb", it was established in 1922 through a Royal Charter as the British Broadcasting Company. The current Royal Charter took effect in January 2007 and lasts until 2016 (Gibbs, 2007).
With the proliferation of new technology, media, and distribution channels, the BBC is now at a crossroads.


BBC's income from licence fees is estimated at GBP 3 billion per year (Sabbagh, April 2008).
Related to this, the Beeb has come under fire recently for making expensive technological investments in order to improve its reach and distribution to the Internet-savvy population. One of its most highly criticized projects is the BBC iPlayer.
The BBC iPlayer is a free online service created to deliver archived content via the Internet. It acts as a "catch-up" facility where consumers may view past programmes from BBC One, BBC Two, BBC Three, BBC Four, CBBC, CBeebies, BBC News 24, and BBC Parliament ("About BBC IPlayer").
This application has been rebranded several times by the BBC. Since it was first incepted as the "iMP", it has been called the "Integrated Media Player", the "Interactive Media Player", and the "MyBBCPlayer", until it was finally launched as the "BBC iPlayer" or simply, "iPlayer".
The announcement by the BBC of its intent to develop a Creative Archive has been the single most important event in getting people to understand the potential for digital creativity, and to see how such potential actually supports artists and artistic creativity.
If the vision proves a reality, Britain will beco ...
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