Historical Approach of Mary Shelley

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1. A. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is tightly connected to the historical changes and events taken place in the 18th and 19th centuries. There are many historical, moral and philosophical approaches in this work that are still rather important for us today…

Introduction

Many people believe that Mary Shelly's work cannot be considered from historical point of view, but these people overlook the fact that the 18th and 19th centuries are the time of intensive scientific development and industrial revolution. Furthermore, many of their attributes are reflected in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. This essay will argue that it is possible to consider Mary Shelley's Frankenstein in historical approach. In addition to that, style and subject matter of the work, as well as Mary Shelley's Frankenstein historical context will be discussed.
B. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein was written in the early 19th century. The novel begins from the events took place in the Arctic Circle, when "Walton's ship becomes ice-bound, and as he contemplates his isolation and paralysis, he spots a figure traveling across the ice on a dog sledge. This is Victor Frankenstein's creature" (Frankenstein. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia). This narration reflects the mankind aspiration to the North Pole and exploration of arctic territories which repeatedly occurred in the 18th and 19th century. This beginning (as well as the end) of the novel is not casual: the Arctic Circle was one of the least explored territories of the Earth, and people didn't know the nature of this area. So, the intriguing plot development begins in the Arctic Circle as the symbol of mystery and unpredictability.
The time when the novel was written was that of rapid scie ...
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