Kate Chopin's "The Storm"

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As you've probably already known, the beliefs about marriage, sex and feminine sexuality that existed at the end of the 19th century, the period when Kate Chopin wrote "The Storm", differed greatly from the ones that exist nowadays. This story, unlike most of other authoress' works, hadn't been published during Chopin's lifetime; it was found in many decades after her death among piles of papers in her grandson's attic.


In fact, mentioning feminine sexuality alone was considered to be improper. The society was persuaded that women do not have any sexual desires, that for the females sex is just one of the chores they have to accomplish together with washing the dishes and cooking. "The Storm" offered view on the feminine sexuality that was totally new for that time, and, probably, in the authoress' opinion the society wasn't ready to discuss this topic.
The title of the story is the main metaphor used in the text, the kernel around which the entire story is built. Joanna Bartee, the author of the analysis of the Chopin's story found in The Making of a Southerner& Other Essays, notes: " Chopin uses the image of the storm to represent the sexual tension that builds throughout the story between Alcee and Calixta". And it isn't the only purpose for which the authoress uses this metaphor. With the help of it Kate Chopin illustrates the ideas some of her women contemporaries had of marriage and sex, and her own understanding of the feminine sexuality.
The first important message about the storm (meaning the breach of the female protagonist's sexuality) was that it happened when her husband and son were away, and they decided to wait until the storm wore off. ...
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