Australian Aboriginal Health Issues
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Health Issues Running Head: COLONISATION & INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIAN/ ABORIGINAL HEALTH ISSUES Aboriginal Health Issues in APA Style Aboriginal Health Issues 2 Abstract The essay colonisation & indigenous Australian/ Aboriginal health issues are an argument for a primary health care approach for the Indigenous people. Equity, empowerment and intersect oral partnerships are strategic to primary health care. These are the important elements of maintaining health. As health is...
Colonisation & Indigenous Australian/ Aboriginal Health Issues
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aboriginal Health Issues Running Head: COLONISATION & INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIAN/ ABORIGINAL HEALTH ISSUES Aboriginal Health Issues in APA Style Aboriginal Health Issues 2 Abstract The essay colonisation & indigenous Australian/ Aboriginal health issues are an argument for a primary health care approach for the Indigenous people. Equity, empowerment and intersect oral partnerships are strategic to primary health care. These are the important elements of maintaining health. As health is implanted in the social preconditions...
Aboriginal perspectives and science
9 pages (2250 words) , Essay
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...aboriginal peoples and affirm their contributions to indigenous science studies. Aboriginal perspective can foster cross-cultural understanding by incorporate indigenous perspectives in learning objectives and assessments, planning a cross range of learning objectives to engage students with knowledge, affective, and practise learning outcomes that is associated with indigenous perspectives, incorporating indigenous content and evidence from research into indigenous issues in course materials, and also by engaging students with indigenous... ? Aboriginal perspectives and science The concept of indigenous science is very unfamiliar to most Canadian education systems. The education policies that was...
Educating Aboriginal Children
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Children Before the 1970s Aboriginal education was not sufficiently important to the Australian education curricular developers. This educational program was not well organized and was neglected by the educationist and the educational system. Keith McConnochie1 brought up the issue of the absence of serious commitment on fundamental issues in Aboriginal education. He contended that educators were strongly predisposed towards assimilationist ends as well as person changing programs (Barcan, A. 1993, 191). Policies before this time failed to effect any change of thinking and Aborigines were still expected to modify their behaviour, language, skills and values so as to fit... Educating...
Presentation " Working with Aboriginal Elders"
1 pages (250 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Elders Working with Aboriginal elders is a book written by an called Ellerby. The book describes issues that existed while working with the aboriginal elders. It continues by discussing issues related to understanding of the aboriginal elders and healers. In addition, the book continues to describe the cultural conflicts that existed in the course of working in institutions and the health care agencies. The book is hence a research finding conducted by researchers in Aboriginal land. The study majorly focused on the Aboriginal elders and how research could be carried out on them. The researchers undertook a participatory means of conducting their research and decided... to conduct...
Modern Aboriginal Literature
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal society, this is passive literature. Lionel Fogerty, as part of the Aboriginal writers, together with Alexis, shares the political context of Aboriginal people. For example, they seem to share this radical understanding of how colonial imperialism has continued to shape the modern Australia (Munkelt, 2013). This is evident as the modern Aboriginal literature content on circulation touches on a wide range of social-cultural issues like homosexuality, racism, refugees, deaths in custody, kidnapping, and the universal subject on the dislocations of peoples’ experiences as they are split between...
Canadian Aboriginal Law
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Law The Canadian Aboriginal law is the customs legislation by aboriginal people upheld in the Canadian Supreme Court. It is a doctrine of Western law that was adopted to disparate the people’s fundamental rights of using and being governed by their own laws. It concerns various issues related to the aboriginal people in Canada by providing specific rights to traditional practices and land. However, the doctrine interprets, controls, and enforces several treaties agreed between the Aboriginal people and the government. This assists in managing and bonding the interaction between the government and the aboriginals. The aboriginal law was adopted from several sources of legislation... Canadian...
TheEeffect of the Residential Schools on the Aboriginal People in BC Canada
8 pages (2000 words) , Term Paper
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...Aboriginal people as a result of the failed effort at forced acculturation (Aman, 2008, p. 365). It is important, therefore, to understand the effects that residential schools had on the Aboriginal people and Canadian culture in general, factors that have contribute to current mental health issues experience by Aboriginal’s, and to better understand how to reconcile over a century of hard feelings towards one another. Residential Schools and their Effect on National Health and Healing Anytime a group of people in society is subjected to treatment based on who they are and the culture that they are raised in, there will likely be adverse effects down the road. This can be seen... ? Effect of Residential...
Aboriginal Residential Schools
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...ABORIGINAL RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS of the of the This article explains the effects of Aboriginal residential schools on Canadian society and its economy. The establishment and cessation of such schools spanned roughly a period of one century, but it had serious repercussions on the mainstream society as well as Aboriginal peoples. The government of Canada spends a lot to address the issues of unemployment and provide mental and physical health care, but the task is huge and would not be possible without taking more measures to eradicate poverty among the Aboriginal peoples, so that they can also become...
Aboriginal studies
7 pages (1750 words) , Essay
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...issues and resources connected to racism. The site is appropriate for supervised use for older or advanced students. It is heavily text-based, so is less appropriate for indigenous students than non-indigenous students. Board of Studies NSW (2007) Affirmations of Identity: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Visual Artists Resource Kit - Teacher’s Handbook. Retrieved May 06, 2008, from: http://ab... TEACHER RESOURCES Anon. (08 December 2004) Lesson: My Journey. Retrieved May 06, 2008 http www.multiculturalaustralia.edu.au/lessons/lessondetail.php?lessonDocID=93 A step-by-step lesson for stage four that focuses on range of colours, sizes and textures as well as the variety of placement and varrying tech...
Summary/Commentary of an article
2 pages (500 words) , Assignment
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...aboriginal conceptions of art in an effective manner. For instance, they established the controversy in the functions of objects where art objects are nonfunctional in Eurocentric thought but very functional in First nations. The authors presented a relevant example by researching and summarizing the art forms, creativity, and talent, artistic expressions of the Anishinawbe community. I agree with the authors’ assertion that art education can address the art controversies by considering cultural perspectives of different people. Reference Irwin, R., & Farrell, R. (1996). Framing of Aboriginal Art. In Long, D.A. and Dickason, O. P. (Eds.), Visions of the...
Aboriginal people and the Canadian justice system
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal peoples. JURISDICTIONAL REACH OF THE INTIATIVES Besides the fact that the restorative and sentencing community projects is a national wide issue which has been deeply entrenched in the constitution via the constitution act 1867,provincial governments have been given the a larger part to play in initiating projects within their provincial jurisdiction to address the issue. Overall, the Program helps Aboriginal people who are in conflict with the criminal justice system... Order 162972 ABORIGINAL PEOPLE AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM INTRODUCTION The constitution of Canada through the constitutional act 1867 has recognized the existence of aboriginal communities or people and thus has...
Health Issue of Aboriginal
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...Issue of Aboriginal Affiliation: The aboriginal are aware of their health issues based on the number of illnesses they have as well as the numerous visits they make to the health centers. They however blame the government and the issue of racism on their predicament and not the fact that majority are uneducated hence are not aware of the best nutritional health and taking health precautions like the rest of the civilized communities. They have continued to isolate themselves from the rest of the population and hence continue to be left behind when changes in health sector are taking place and this explains...
Aboriginal land rights in Australia
20 pages (5000 words) , Research Proposal
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...Aboriginal Rights, but the Aborigines themselves have organized locally and nationally to bring the grievances and the injustices suffered by their people to the attention of other Australians and to people abroad."1 Nevertheless, there are alarming difficulties regarding the debate on land rights. The issue has branched out extensively to include political implications which made it extremely complicated to represent... Introduction Australia have witnessed one of the most significant social and political event over the last twenty years, the aboriginal land rights movements. Contemporary Australia is recently been intimately linked to the accounts of the movement that have formed around the...
Comparative paper between aboriginal people of canada and palestinian people
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...Issues They Had According to McNab and Ute (50-51), the introduction of the Indian Act in Canada led to anishinaabe people to lose their land. The act has all the details about the Aboriginal life. It shows the nature of the anishinaabe governing body, land tenure systems and how the aboriginal cultural practices can be restricted. The main aim of the act was to be in charge of the lives of anishinaabe people and their culture. The Indian Act made the government to be the one deciding on where these people will relocate especially in reserves. The act also has been an important element in controlling the aboriginal affairs in the country... How the Anishinaabe People Lost Their Lands and the Social...
Aboriginal Maternal Health and Outcomes
9 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers and babies with non-Aboriginal mothers and babies from 2006 to 2010 Issue Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers and babies The Rest of the population in NSW (non-Aboriginal mothers) Reported Births Increased (2,649 to 3,138) Increased (12,311 to 13,795) Births to teenage mothers Decreased from 20.5% to 18.6% Decreased from 3.8% to 3.4% Mothers giving birth at the age of 35 and above Remained stable at 9% Increased from 21.6% to 24.2% mothers starting antenatal care at
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research task
5 pages (1250 words) , Research Paper
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...Aboriginal and Torres Straight Island people is a critical issue that the Australian government should address. Part 2; Learning Experience The purpose of this learning experience is to create awareness of the aboriginal people in young learners and to help them appreciate their culture. In this project, the learners will be presented with two pictures; one showing an aboriginal citizen and one showing a non-indigenous person. The learners will be required to identify any differences, be it physical, emotional or mental, that stands between the two people. After this, each learner will provide a stereotype associated with each person and provide its meaning (Taylor & Biddle, 2008). Next... Aboriginal...
Aboriginal Community Health and Well-Being
11 pages (2750 words) , Download 2 , Essay
...aboriginals when handling issues of health (Kennedy-Dubourdieu, 2006). Cultural practices fail to embrace scientific approach of handling issues in health. The notion largely, applies to Aboriginals who live in the reserves and believe on collectivist ideas. The response that a community gives to health problem dictates the number of people that are likely to succumb to death from a particular illness. Historically, the Aboriginals administered their own concoction, which define the number of health problems associated with the Aboriginal communities. Environmental factors that lead to disease outbreak depend on population and living standards... ? Aboriginal Community Health and Well-Being Aboriginal...
Aboriginal studies
7 pages (1750 words) , Research Paper
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...Aboriginal Studies Compare the environment or social organization of two study areas Southeast and Southwest in relation to the key theme of Religion. Answer the following questions: How are the regions similar? How do they differ? Can you see reasons for this? Introduction In the aboriginal studies, the Americas are separated geographically. As environment is the major differentiator in tribal ways of life, cultural and social features of different natives are similar within each division. South East and South West are two such cultural areas of the 12 geographically divided regions. Natives of the South -- southeast and southwest -- lived somewhat...
Building on Reflective Practice: Becoming real Aboriginal teachers
1 pages (250 words) , Book Report/Review
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...Aboriginal teachers Becoming ‘real’ Aboriginal teachers: attending to intergenerational narrative reverberations and responsibilities The article written by Young, et al. (2010) proffered issues pertinent to the narrated stories on the experiences of six Aboriginal teachers: Brenda, Mary, Jennifer, Jerri-Lynn, Khea, Lucy and Lulu as they pursued higher education in Canada and delved into research work. The intergenerational narrative reverberations were used intermittently throughout the discourse to manifest stories told of each teacher’s experiences that remain part of the cultural, historical, social events that shaped their personal... and professional development. The remarkable comments...
Australian aboriginal perspectives in the classroom
8 pages (2000 words) , Assignment
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...issue that the aboriginals face is proving land ownership. The Aboriginal people lack of trust of white society as they think of them as oppressors and bad people. This is because they introduced alcohol and poisoned aboriginal people with diseases that they were not immune to as well as, raping their women and killing their children (Broome, 2010). To the Aboriginal people colonization meant genocide and oppression because they were denied the right to live their lives under their rule, customs and policies. For that reason, the Aboriginal people lost trust on the white, however, today they have become accepting as the laws have changed... Australian aboriginal perspectives in the room Affiliation...
Canada's Missing And Murdered Aboriginal Women
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...issue has blown into different parameters, the government ought to consider the potential implication of the disappearances by setting up a national public inquiry, better police intercommunication and improving the relations between the aboriginal and non-aboriginal more so in the police relations. Background The issue of the disappearance of the women can be best explained using the highway of tears... . This is documentation of the number of deaths that have taken place in an 800 km stretch between Prince George and Prince Lupert. The documentation covered the number of the disappearances to be between 18 according to the official information, however, the aboriginal...
What do some of themediaresources circulating on-lineon thetopic of Indigenous (Australia) family violence reveal about popular interest in and understandings of the gender issues involved, in our local or global contemporary contexts?
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...issue spreading across the entire country. Family violence especially in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait people is prevalent, and various organizations have been in the fore to address it with an aim to eradicate it. Sadly, a number of women have lost their lives because of these cases, and pressure has been mounting for the government to address the issue more... adequately. The Australian media have also been vocal in fighting this vice with The Australian reporting that “violence against women and children here is as bad as ever” (The Australian 2014). While the issue here is a focus on Australia, this paper will delve further into analyzing the gender...
Palliative Care for Aboriginal People
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginals. Another objective is awareness towards cultural sensitivity while maintaining a professional approach. It is not enough to know that a certain community behaves in a certain manner. The nurse has to go the extra mile, respect their culture, and have objective approaches to deal with cultural issues that may be a hindrance to proper care giving. For instance, a son may refuse to take care of the sick mother because some communities see this as wrong in which case the nurse can seek out a female friend of the sick individual. While most institutions in the country are keen on cultural awareness, there is only so much formal training can do... ?Running head: PALLIATIVE CARE FOR ABORIGINAL...
Policing of Aboriginal Communities with Emphasis on Canadian Policing Examples. - Urban and Rural Differences in Policing in Canada and at large to be examined
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...issues of aboriginal communities. Now, communities get support from the police in managing their risks. Both work hand-in-hand to solve the crime and law & order problems created by local inhabitants. In the Community Policing Model, the police don’t behave irrationally to cope up with law & order issues; it takes proactive steps to recognize and remedy, to establish peace. The police intervenes in the dialogue process to know the opinion of the community on touchy issues, first by holding general level discussions with the concerned community and later, with other important members of the group... Topic: Policing of Aboriginal Communities with Emphasis on Canadian Policing Examples. - Urban and Rural...
Building on Reflective Practice: Becoming real Aboriginal teachers
1 pages (250 words) , Book Report/Review
Only on StudentShare
...Aboriginal teachers Becoming ‘real’ Aboriginal teachers: attending to intergenerational narrative reverberations and responsibilities The article written by Young, et al. (2010) proffered issues pertinent to the narrated stories on the experiences of six Aboriginal teachers: Brenda, Mary, Jennifer, Jerri-Lynn, Khea, Lucy and Lulu as they pursued higher education in Canada and delved into research work. The terms ‘intergenerational narrative reverberations’ were used repeatedly throughout the article to indicate stories told of each teacher’s cultural, historical, and social experiences that shaped their personal and professional development... . In this reading, I learned of the different...
Building on Reflective Practice: Becoming real Aboriginal teachers
2 pages (500 words) , Download 0 , Book Report/Review
Free
...Aboriginal teachers Becoming ‘real’ Aboriginal teachers: attending to intergenerational narrative reverberations and responsibilities The article written by Young, et al. (2010) proffered issues pertinent to the narrated stories on the experiences of six Aboriginal teachers: Brenda, Mary, Jennifer, Jerri-Lynn, Khea, Lucy and Lulu as they pursued higher education in Canada and delved into research work. The terms ‘intergenerational narrative reverberations’ were used repeatedly throughout the article to indicate stories told of each teacher’s cultural, historical, and social experiences that shaped their personal and professional development... . In this reading, I learned of the different...
Canadaian Studies
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal and Northern Issues in Canadian Society The aboriginal population in the northern Canadian Society is a representation of the fastest growing segment of the Canadian population. Currently, the Inuits and the Métis people want to regain back their rights by rebuilding their communities and revitalizing their culture. Additionally, they are also keen in increasing their share in Canada, which is now one of the most prosperous countries in the world (Simeone, 2011). In colonization history and the past government, policies have negatively affected the aboriginal communities in the Northwest of the country. The...
Are those new ways of communicating and disseminating information (such as Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, Blogs etc.) a positive or negative influence on the democratic system in either the United State or Canada?
2 pages (500 words) , Research Paper
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...Aboriginal issues, no amendments to the constitution so far have been implemented (Russell 5). Moreover, the perception that Aborigines lack capability to self-govern and that they will eventually be assimilated into Canadian system does not favor such an Endeavour. Aboriginal self-government is an impractical alternative to Canada as the Canadian constitution does not leave room for such an undertaking. According to McCormick (nap) the British North American Act of 1867 only recognized two forms of government: federal and provincial thus a third order is unwelcome. Even if Aborigines would gain self-governance it would be in the confines of Canadian laws. Aboriginals... Introduction The British North...
Learning Statement -this paper is for The Aboriginal Peoples of Canada class ( First Nation course).
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Healing Movement The Aboriginal Peoples of Canada (First Nation was not only informing but also an interesting one. My interest in the class began right from the first lesson when an introduction to the course was done. The class provided me with an opportunity to understand and appreciate the history of Canada. This was made possible through a study of the evolution of the traditional Canada and how it transformed to become what it is today. This evolution process of traditional Canada fascinated me very much and made me aware of where the Canadian society has come from. Due to the interest that I had in the course and my eagerness to learn...
Canadian Aboriginal Community Assessment and Diagnosis
9 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal communities may have different requirements to achieve a state of health and well...  Community Assessment and Diagnosis Assessment of the health status is an essential pre-requisite for devising suitable healthcare programmes. In this connection there are certain terms which need explanation. According to Stamler and Yiu (2012), an aggregate community is “a group of people with common interests, culture, beliefs, or goals” and the core of the community is people “characterized by their age, sex, socioeconomic status, education level, occupation, ethnicity and religion” (pg. 214). Therefore, community health care providers and health nurses, when examining a community or aggregate for c...
Different modes of interpreting treaties between North American Aboriginal Peoples and the Crown
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...issues before the Supreme Court was whether the 1752 treaty, the same treaty of the issue in Syliboy had a provision for a right of hunting that excluded the administration of the provincial law. The Chief justice argued that the judgment that was passed in the Syliboy case was a reflection of the prejudices and the biasness, (Harold 1969) He was categorical that that treaty was designed by parties which were competent, in this judgment the chief justice four principles that forms the modern interpretative mode of the aboriginal treaties with the crown, (Christina 2005). First, Indian treaties should be construed in a manner that the Indians will understand them... Introduction Indian treaties...
Discuss how federal policies towards band government (Aboriginal Bands) have changed over time, especially during the 20th century
12 pages (3000 words) , Essay
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...issues were addressed, including the enactment of balances that sought to ensure that the aboriginal women retained their Indian status upon marrying non Indian husbands. The pinnacle of these adjustments was marked when the proposal of the introduction of an aboriginal oriented government that would steer the address of aboriginal solution. Final remarks The 21st century saw the introduction of new proposals in the Indian act. This was based on the sharing of resources11. The chief consideration was the benefit of the immediate community upon which the natural resources... Changes in Federal Policies Towards Band Government (Aboriginal Bands) Introduction The historical perception of the...
Discuss how federal policies towards band government (Aboriginal Band's) have changed over time, especially during the 20th c
12 pages (3000 words) , Essay
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...issues were addressed, including the enactment of balances that sought to ensure that the aboriginal women retained their Indian status upon marrying non Indian husbands. The pinnacle of these adjustments was marked when the proposal of the introduction of an aboriginal oriented government that would steer the address of aboriginal solution. Final remarks The 21st century saw the introduction of new proposals in the Indian act. This was based on the sharing of resources11. The chief consideration was the benefit of the immediate community upon which the natural resources... ?Changes in Federal Policies Towards Band Government (Aboriginal Bands) Introduction The historical perception of the aboriginal...
Aboriginal (Native) Peoples of Canada: there perspectives on mental disorders
8 pages (2000 words) , Research Paper
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...ABORIGINES’ PERCEPTIONS ON MENTAL DISORDERS Aboriginal (Native) Peoples of Canada: There Perspectives on Mental Disorders of Student] [Name of Institution] Introduction The increasing awareness and need to address mental health problems and issues among the aboriginal communities of Canada are quite apparent. A major contributing factor to this increased awareness of mental health among the Canadian aboriginals is the escalating rate of mental illnesses such as anxiety and depression and their effects (Olive, 1992). In addition, suicide cases and domestic violence have also been on the rise in the recent past, making the need to address mental health problems an urgent one... Running Head: CANADIAN...
Aboriginal (Native) Peoples of Canada: there Perspectives on Mental Disorders
8 pages (2000 words) , Research Paper
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...ABORIGINES’ PERCEPTIONS ON MENTAL DISORDERS Aboriginal (Native) Peoples of Canada: There Perspectives on Mental Disorders [Name of Student] [Name of Institution] Introduction The increasing awareness and need to address mental health problems and issues among the aboriginal communities of Canada are quite apparent. A major contributing factor to this increased awareness of mental health among the Canadian aboriginals is the escalating rate of mental illnesses such as anxiety and depression and their effects (Olive, 1992). In addition, suicide cases and domestic violence have also been on the rise in the recent past, making the need to address mental health problems an urgent... ?Running Head: CANADIAN...
Analyse different representations of Australian colonial history, and of the suffering of Aboriginal people
1 pages (250 words) , Essay
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...aboriginal communities adopting white man’s technologies in ways that are compatible with their own values which have preserved their society for centuries.. Aboriginal territories should have their own councils responsive to issues peculiar to their own inhabitants. White children should study aboriginal history in it’s own context without seeing it through the prism of their own values. Finally, I feel there are features of aboriginal culture which could beneficially be adapted by white society such as criminals being required to make their victims whole rather than being incarcerated Although I agree with Howard... ? Nicole’s Exercise This essay is based on speeches by two of Australia’s prime...
Rachel Perkins
13 pages (3250 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal conflict at all, in favor of universal themes. Radiance and Bran Nue Dae are excellent examples of this. Moreover, the overarching themes that she uses, when she does address the whites-Aboriginal conflicts, are that the Aboriginal peoples are resilient and able to overcome their social issues. This essay will detail how Rachel Perkins challenges the narrative of white oppression by demonstrating how her themes are focused around universality and overcoming adversity, as well as show how another theme, which relates to the overall themes of minimizing white oppression, that of the use... ?Introduction Rachel Perkins is an Aboriginal filmmaker who is tasked with portraying the Aboriginal...
Community Health Nurse Role and Skills Required to Improve Equity and Access to Renal Healthcare for Australian Aboriginal Peopl
10 pages (2500 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...aboriginal people has been attributed to many factors. However, the most outstanding and astonishing of all factors is the issue of inequality that exists within the Australian community based on certain aspects of society such as resource mobilization and distribution, basic human needs and rights provision, access to education and professional training, participation in national building, economic factors, social segregation and generally all forms of discriminative practices that have historically... ? Community Health Nurse Roles and skills required to improve equity and access to Renal Healthcare for Australian Aboriginal peoples from a population health perspective (Name) (University) (Course)...
Aboriginal history
2 pages (500 words) , Coursework
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...Aboriginal History This paper is my reflective response to the book ‘Telling the Truth about Aboriginal History’ by Bain Attwood, which contains a heart-wrenching account of the Aborigines. Reading the book made me realize the pain that the Aborigines went through. They not only lost their culture, lives and land, but also had to live with the pain of knowing that somewhere out there their loved ones were alive, except they did not know where1. There are many significant key points that I would consider as crucial because this will have a positive result on the students. A survey was conducted that revealed that 38% of children were taken away from their families. Many families are still... Part...
Legal research questions
4 pages (1000 words) , Case Study
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...Aboriginal Issues (a) The Kalgoorlie-Boulder Community Court is a trail court that is more exclusive for aboriginal people than traditional courts. This court is part of the Magistrate court of Western Australia. The court will operate only during sentencing but will not involve different laws or customary... (i) Evans v Queen Trial Started: November 2004 Court of Criminal Appeal Judgment: 07the September 2006 High Court of Australia Judgment: 13th December 2007 The Trial court ordered the accused to dress up like the armed robber and the jury compared the security camera footage of the hold up. DNA taken from the base ball capital matched the accused Mr. Evan's DNA profile which was expected to occur onl...
Aboriginal culture
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Culture Number Question a. Aboriginal Dreaming is not merely a series of mythical stories about ancestral heritage and the forming of earth but encompasses all that is indigenous in relation to knowledge; integral to knowledge and Dreaming is indigenous spirituality. Western science and Aboriginal knowledge are complementary and both provide insight into our world and environment. Just as western science seeks to provide answers to questions pertaining to our past, present and future, so too does Aboriginal knowledge (Dreaming) and one cannot be dismissed in favour of the other, instead the two should interact and work together. The English term Dreaming is more an analogy than... ...
Aboriginal Children
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Children Task Australian Aboriginal is the oldest living culture in the earth. They are living a nomadic life following the seasons and the food. The 19th century was said to be the period of dispossession. The dispossession took place in the first century and a half of European-Aboriginal relations in Australia. This was characterized as the period of dispossession, physical ill treatment, social disruption, population decline, economic exploitation, codified discrimination and cultural devastation. (Gardiner- Garden, 1999). During the dispossession a law was implemented to remove the Aboriginal children (especially girls with light skins) from their parents. The removal... Child Care -...
Australia Study3611( Australian languages: Issues and Debates2)
12 pages (3000 words) , Essay
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...issues has shed further light on these issues and offers promising prospects for connections between these languages (Dixon, 1989). There is some consensus to the fact that there were between 350 and 750 distinct Aboriginal groups and such a number of languages and dialects as well (Walsh, 1991) but in comparison there are less than 150 indigenous languages that are spoken in Australia anymore (Dalby, 1998) with only 20 out of the list of endangered languages. The languages that have survived only have a rate of some 10% of being learned by children in isolated areas where these languages were originally spoken or are being spoken in. As an example, out of the five endangered languages... Provide an...
Professor Megan Davis invites us to consider whether it is possible to 'marry two diametrically opposed rituals - the Constitution and Aboriginal history - in a way that does not offend what is impermissible hindsight when it comes to race relations
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...issue is that of constitutional recognition which means that they need to be recognized for occupying Australia as well as their cultural links with the land and waters. There is also need for protection of their unique culture and heritage. The original constitution made only two direct references to Aboriginal Australians. They were not involved in the Parliament’s power to make laws according to the needs of the various people that were present in the Commonwealth. The assumption was that the Aboriginals were a dying race. Amendments in the year 1967 meant that laws could be passed in support of the Aboriginal Australians... Indigenous Australians Introduction Indigenous Australians have been...
Canada as a Nation-Sociology of Diversity: Issues for Canadians
3 pages (750 words) , Download 0 , Essay
Free
...issues touching on their identity as a nation because of the perception that perhaps the nation has been evolving. Ethnicity has undoubtedly been a central consideration in Canada’s social fragment, and the issue could have had dilapidating effects had it not been handled well. Quintessentially, the mostly historically significant aspect of the expansive diversity issue in Canada has been the country’s ability to forge ahead and redefine itself. Originally occupied by Aboriginal communities, the protectorates which were to be part of Canada experienced dissimilar waves of immigration. This started with French followed by British occupation in the 17th century, and prevailed... ?Running head: Canada as a...
Aboriginal native of canada
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal rights in the court. This did not however stop the efforts of the Indigenous groups to fight for their rights in the Canadian society and the preservation of their cultural heritage. With the continued uprising of Aboriginal political organizations and protests in the 1960s, the issue of the Indian Act became a center stage in the political debate of the Canadian government. A proposal was drafted which proposed that the Indian reserves should be eliminated and the collective rights... The Indian Act affiliation The Indian Act The Indian Act is a piece of federal legislation that defines all the characteristics of Aboriginal life, focusing on the nature of band...
Aboriginal Rights (Canada)
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Rights and Freedoms in Canada Introduction Aboriginal rights refer to the rights and privilegesaccorded to the aboriginal people, formerly referred to as the owners of the land in Canada. The aboriginal rights in Canada feature in the Canadian constitution in section 35 of the charter of rights as part of the legal boundary governing the people in Canada (Clark 192). They are separate entity rights in Canada that the aboriginal people have practiced and acclimatized to over time. Historically, the aboriginal rights merely protected the aboriginal people and their status in the society. However, the rights and freedoms accorded to the aboriginal people have taken a new... Facilitator: The...
Housing for Aboriginal Australia
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...aboriginals to ward off trouble during the rains. Neither did such technologies provide them with protection during the winter. However aboriginals' houses didn't acquire such a fast and rapid pace of conversion into modernity in a short time period (ABS, 2001). The transformation process was slow and steady and technology became a critical issue only when indigenous community living became... Housing for Aboriginal Australia Introduction Cultural identity of a tribe, a people, a nation or an ethnic group is best expressed through their housing structures. Australia's aboriginals have placed their signature on the canvas of the country's landscape by raising similar structural abodes of their own. These ...
Aboriginal Contributions to Canada
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aboriginal Contributions to Canada Introduction: In the era prior to the advent of European explorers, the Canadian landscape was inhabited by aboriginals. They belonged to diverse groups such as the Inuit people who inhabited the Arctic areas, the Central Inuit who mostly occupied the western shore areas, the Inuvialuit or the Western Inuit, and the Algonquian groups. The Algonquian people primarily depended on basic activities such as hunting, fishing and trading while those residing along the river banks were known to be agriculturists (Magocsi, 1999). The Canadian indigenous people also known as the First Nations have contributed immensely in various...
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