Psychology. About stress.
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...Adaptation Syndrom theory. In 1926, Hans Selye observed commonality in the behavior of patients suffering from different infectious diseases and were only in the initial phase. Later, he experimented upon animals by injecting toxic chemical in their bodies and found three common reactions. The organisms... ? 4 May, Stress: Stress is just another for tension, depression or the oflow self-esteem. It is essentially a way of responding to perceived threats to survival. Different people are stressed because of different reasons. Common reasons of development of stress are unemployment, inferiority complex, disease and violence. One of the famous theories about stress and psychology is Selye’s General...
Answer all of them i short paragraph ( around 20 sentences)
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...adaptation syndrome developed by Hans Selye and the fight-or-flight response. 2. Explain why chronic stress has such devastating effects on the various body systems. 3. Provide an explanation of the implication of Dr. Wilder Pennfield’s experiment while operating his patient. Explain the potential role the prefrontal lobe in stress management. 4. Differentiate between primary appraisal and secondary appraisal in the transactional model of stress developed by Lazarus. 5. What characteristics does a codependent personality possess? What treatments can be useful for toning down the symptoms of codependency? Hans Selye developed the General Adaptation syndrome that can... be described as a...
Psychology
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...ADAPTATION SYNDROME How do stress and our response to it translate into disease? Great stress, if interfere with your ability to live a normal life, suppresses the immune system – which lowers the body’s resistance to disease. Some of the diseases include cardiovascular disease, hypertension, headaches, back pain, ulcers, and some cases of cancer. Canadian physiologist Hans Selye (1976) proposed a pattern known as the General Adaptation Syndrome (GAS). He noticed that the first symptoms of almost any disease or trauma (poisoning, infection, injury, or stress) are almost similar. Selye’s studies showed that the body responds in the same way to any stress, be it positive events (new job... THE GENERAL...
Human biology College Essay
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...adaptation syndrome" was introduced into medicine and psychology by Canadian physician and endocrinologyst, Hans Selye.He defined general adaptation syndrome as "the sum of all non-specific, systemic reactions of the body which ensue upon long continued exposure to stress" (Selye H., 1976). Nowadays many researchers discuss the role of stress in the pathogenesis of various diseases, e.g. hypertension, coronary disease, depression, stomach ulcer etc. But all these conditions resulted the complicate chain of physiological reactions, which are crucial for the survival of alive organism. Selye and his followers divided the response of the body functional systems into three... The term "stress" or "general...
Down syndrome
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...adaptation (Ambrosini, 1988). For example, the infant's intrinsic biologic vulnerability can be moderated to some degree by the influence of extrinsic (environmental) protective factors (Stray-Gundersen, 2005). The article by Appl (1998) describes the relations between adult and a child with the Down's syndrome and suggests possible methods of communication and interaction. This research is based on substantial literature review and analysis of the current studies on this topic. The author concludes... Running Head Down syndrome Down Syndrome Inserts His/Her Inserts Grade Inserts 24 April 2009 At the beginning of the 20th century, the field of chromosomal disorders was subject to several diverse influ...
Williams Syndrome in Psychology
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...syndrome is also characterized by hypercalcemia of unknown origin, accompanied by distinct cognitive and behavioral profile (Khan, Calureriu, Huang, & Robin, 2011). At this point, such concepts seemed to be more focused on the pathophysiological context of the said condition, disregarding the psychological elements of William syndrome. In appeal, this group is said to be hypersociable, where they are into over-friendliness, as they appear to lack the adaptive behavior... ?William Syndrome: A Psychological Concept Introduction The presentation of genetic disorders can be varied, yet in some ways, similar in manifestation. One of the most popular conditions that had been well-studied is Down syndrome, with ...
REPORT OF NURSING
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...adaptation-syndrome and the diseases of adaptation. Acta.... and Effects of Stress Stress has been reportedly a difficult term to define due to the variety of factors that apparently affect diverse kinds of people. According to the American Institute of Stress, the most applicable definition of stress is that which was coined by a certain Hans Selye in 1936, whose meaning of the term was disclosed as "the non-specific response of the body to any demand for change" (Selye, 1950; cited in American Institute of Stress, n.d., par. 2). The objective of the current mini assignment is to determine the cause and effect of stress that have been linked to various diseases. Initially, some relevant statistics on...
Reflection paper
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...Adaptation Syndrome (GAP). My body labeled the stressor as danger to balance making it release adrenaline hormone. As a result, I performed unfamiliar activities such as crying because of the pain. This was the alarm stage (Caroline & Hicks, 2007). The second phase was of reaction was resistance. My body had reacted to the bad news, and it was time to calm down and lower the production of the stress hormone. My body shifted to the second stage, because the stress was no longer active as before. Finally, I entered the exhaustion stage since the stress persisted, and body started losing ability to fight stressors due to insufficient energy. Hence, I had to stay calm. During this time, I... Stress...
Neumans Health Care Systems Model (HCSM)
2 pages (500 words) , Dissertation
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...Adaptation Syndrome. It is considered to be dynamic as it deals with the client’s continuous interaction with environmental stressors in both wellness and illness conditions, and it shows the uniqueness of the nursing profession as one that views the client holistically (Parker, 1990... ?Neuman’s Health Care Systems Model (HCSM) Overview Betty Neuman’s Health Care Systems Model primarily developed during the 1970s to be utilized in nursing education. This model considers all the factors that affect a client’s response to environmental stressors, and explains how the client achieves homeostasis in his system as these stressors constrain him, taking as basis the General Systems Model and Selye’s General...
Description of four specific ways in which Neuman's HCSM could be used to improve nursing practice.
1 pages (250 words) , Dissertation
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...Adaptation Syndrome. It is considered to be dynamic as it deals with the client’s continuous interaction with environmental stressors in both wellness and illness conditions, and it shows the uniqueness of the nursing profession as one that views the client holistically (Parker, 1990... ?Neuman’s Health Care Systems Model (HCSM) Overview Betty Neuman’s Health Care Systems Model primarily developed during the 1970s to be utilized in nursing education. This model considers all the factors that affect a client’s response to environmental stressors, and explains how the client achieves homeostasis in his system as these stressors constrain him, taking as basis the General Systems Model and Selye’s General...
Answer the question and write a essay
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...Adaptation Syndrome.’ In his model, Hans attributed aging and ailments to excessive exposure to stress. In as much as stress is present in every living thing, it is worth noting that chronic stress may affect the life of a person adversely, especially in their elderly years. Cortisol and adrenaline are the main stress hormones that the body releases upon sensing danger or uneasiness. Hans... Stress-Phase Model Stress is the difference between the self-image of a person and his/her ego ideal. Stress usually arises out of stressing factors that could be work-related or environment-related. The manifestation of stress can be emotional cognitive, behavioral or physical, depending on a number of factors....
Tourette Syndrome
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...adaptation at school and the problem of maintaining age-appropriate social skills has been recognized among adolescents with TS (Leckman et al. 1994). Making Friends Psychologically, some of the behaviors shown by a student with TS may be alternative expressions of an obsessive-compulsive disorder or of affective and anxiety syndromes. TS have been associated with panic attacks, phobias, stuttering, and rapid talking. Defining the limits of tic disorders in regard... Tourette syndrome Introduction Tourette's syndrome is described in much of the literature as an inherited tic disorder. (Merck, 2001). However, other recent literature indicates that only 50 to 70% of the diagnosed cases are hereditary...
TOURETTE SYNDROME
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...adaptation at school and the problem of maintaining age-appropriate social skills has been recognized among adolescents with TS (Heyman and Chowdhury, 2004). In sum, as syndrome, TS... Running Head Tourette Syndrome Tourette Syndrome Tourette Syndrome (TS) belongs to obsessive-compulsive disorders characterized by bodily dysfunctions or sensations. TS is a chronic disease and usually present for the duration of a persons life. Tourette Syndrome is defined as: “a neurological disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics lasting for more than one year” (Tourettes Syndrome Association 2007). Patients with TS have a higher incidence of tics and other neurological soft signs. “A tic is “a rapid...
Stress at Work and School
21 pages (5250 words) , Download 1 , Coursework
...adaptation syndrome (GAS) The foremost analysis of stress was propounded by Selye and is generally based on a triad of psychological responses which is accompanied by physiological challenge. The general adaptation syndrome is defined as the sum total of all non-specific, specific systematic reactions of the body which depends on the long exposure to stress (Selye , n.d.).Anything that generates stress threatens life unless and until... ? Research study on stress at work and school Work related stress and its outcome are one of the major challenging areas of intervention in the complex world of business today. The prime reason for development of the stress related to work is explained with various...
Metabolic syndrome and its management in schizophrenia
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...syndrome and it's management in schizophrenia 2007 Introduction Schizophrenia is a chronic mental disease that causes certain stable changes of the personality, and it is a serious medical and social problem all over the world because it is rather widespread, has considerable impact upon the lives of the patients, and there is still no treatment that is effective enough. As a rule, speaking about schizophrenia, the researchers focus upon the clinical aspect of the illness and social adaptation of people suffering from it. However, one more important aspect of studying schizophrenia is the influence it produces upon health and lifespan. Among other symptoms that are interrelated... with...
Link Between Stess and Illness
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...Adaptation Syndrome’, which divided the stress response into three stages. These included ‘alarm’, the immediate increase in activity upon exposure to the stressor; changes that were identified at that time to occur during the alarm phase include sympathetic nervous system overactivity, tissue catabolism, hypoglycemia, gastro-intestinal erosions, discharge of secretory granules from the adrenal cortex, and hemoconcentration. The next stage is ‘resistance’, where the body attempts to reverse the detrimental effects of the first stage. The final stage is ‘exhaustion... ? THE LINK BETWEEN STRESS AND ILLNESS: REVIEW OF LITERATURE Introduction The role of stress in exacerbating and precipitating illness is a...
Essay for Stress management: Stress
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...Syndrome) and it works in three phases. The first phase is the alarm reaction. Here, the body discharges adrenaline and a range of other psychological machineries to battle the stress and try to have everything in control. The muscles tense, the perspiration and breathing increases, the heart beats faster, the eyes dilate, and the stomach may compress. The body is prepared to “flee” or “fight”. However, if the cause of that stress is eliminated, the body returns back to normal. If the stress is not eliminated, GAS proceeds to its second phase called the adaptation or resistance stage. The body secretes more hormones that cause the blood sugar levels to...
Tourette Syndrome Essay
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...Syndrome Tourette Syndrome Tourette Syndrome (TS) belongs to obsessive-compulsive disorders characterized by bodily dysfunctions or sensations. TS is a chronic disease and usually present for the duration of a person's life. Tourette Syndrome is defined as: "a neurological disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics lasting for more than one year" (Tourette's Syndrome Association 2007). Patients with TS have a higher incidence of tics and other neurological soft signs. "A tic is "a rapid and involuntary movement or vocalization" (Tourette's Syndrome Association 2007). The purpose of the paper is to identify and describe the most typical causes and symptoms of TS... Running Head Tourette...
Assignment
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...adaptation syndrome refers to the bodys response to stress over time. It is commonly divided into three parts including alarm (excitation of the response), resistance (prolonging the response), and exhaustion/recovery (can cause damage if exhaustion is extended due to chronic stress). 4. Five major categories of stress are acute, episodic, chronic, eustress (good stress), and distress... Here Here Here Here Homework Answers Chapter 2 The biopsychological model of psychological health emphasizes the importance of both biological and psychological processes in the development of mental health. 2. Characteristics commonly demonstrated by psychological healthy people include feeling good about who they are, ...
Sleep and sleep disturbance factors among critically ill patients
4 pages (1000 words) , Download 1 , Research Paper
...adaptation syndrome was derived at after the three adaptive phases were brought together; alarm reaction, resistance... ? Sleep and Sleep Disturbance Factors among Critically Ill Patients Introduction Selye stress theory stipulates on the causal triggers of stress. Selye (1936) observed that patients with different health problems had certain responses that were triggered by the health problems. This is what he termed as stress. In his later works, he used the term stressor to refer to the stimulus involved in the provocation of the stress response (Nevid, 2009). On his continued approach and articulation of stress, Selye (1974) noted that, it is not possible to avoid stress. In this regard, general...
Sleep and sleep disturbance factors among critically ill patients
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...adaptation syndrome was derived at after the three adaptive phases were brought together; alarm reaction, resistance... Sleep and Sleep Disturbance Factors among Critically Ill Patients Introduction Selye stress theory stipulates on the causal triggers of stress. Selye (1936) observed that patients with different health problems had certain responses that were triggered by the health problems. This is what he termed as stress. In his later works, he used the term stressor to refer to the stimulus involved in the provocation of the stress response (Nevid, 2009). On his continued approach and articulation of stress, Selye (1974) noted that, it is not possible to avoid stress. In this regard, general adapta...
Stress Theories
8 pages (2000 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...Adaptation Syndrome (GAS). Accordingly, he suggested that the Alarm Reaction is equivalent to the fight-or-flight response and includes the various neurological and physiological responses when confronted... Examine some of the alternative theories of stress which have been put forward in health psychology and discuss their practical usefulness DiscussionIt has been noted that stress demonstrates a range of negative feelings and reactions that go with intimidating or demanding situations. A definite amount of stress was even suggested to be essential for survival and that not all stress reactions are unenthusiastic. It was pointed out, however, that while a certain amount of stress is necessary for...
Stress Management
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...Adaptation Syndrome 3 Alarm 3 Resistance 3 Exhaustion 3 Eustress and Distress 4 Cognitive Appraisal Model 4 Sources of Stress 4 Impacts of Long Term Stress 5 Need to Manage Stress 6 Managing Stress 6 Stress Measurement 6 Stress Management Models 7 Transactional Model 7 Health Realisation / Innate Health Model 8 Stress Relieving Techniques 8 Conclusion 8 Bibliography 8 Introduction to Stress The term stress is widely used in both physiology and biology. Usage begun in the 1930’s through Hans Selye’s work and became popular in recent decades. Stress refers to the results due to failure of an organism... Stress Management Table of Contents Table of Contents Introduction to Stress 2 Stress Models 3 General...
Passive and an Active Stress Response
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...Adaptation Syndrome. In Selye’s experiment, he uses laboratory animals to assess biologic system changes and found out the mind’s emotional responses to stress (Videbeck, 2008, p. 242). Passive and Active Stress Response The journal made by Laiolo in 2009 about the effect of capture and handling on free-living red-billed choughs Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax discusses the association between bird behavioral response, individual’s health, sex... ? Passive and an Active Stress Response The essay aims to address a two-fold objective to wit to discuss the difference between a passive and an active stress response; and (2) to explain further the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Axis and behavioral differences...
The impact of stress on the individual
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...adaptive function"3. Selye called this reaction the General Adaptation Syndrome (GAS... The impact of stress on the individual First of all, let's find proper meaning to the term 'stress'. "Stress can be defined as the physiological reaction of the body to an external or internal event. It is a demand placed on the individual that disturbs homeostasis and requires an adjustment on the part of the individual"1. Stress can be connected either with positive or negative effects, but the second one is more likely to cause stress. Lots of life events result stress. Illness of relatives, birth of a child, marriage, death of loved one are among them. Sensory input, including noise, light, crowds, is a minor fact...
Stress Management Research Paper
7 pages (1750 words) , Download 1 , Research Paper
...Adaptation Syndrome 3 Alarm 3 Resistance 3 Exhaustion 3 Eustress and Distress 4 Cognitive Appraisal Model 4 Sources of Stress 4 Impacts of Long Term Stress 5 Need to Manage Stress 6 Managing Stress 6 Stress Measurement 6 Stress Management Models 7 Transactional Model 7 Health Realisation / Innate Health Model 8 Stress Relieving Techniques 8 Conclusion 8 Bibliography 8 Introduction to Stress The term stress is widely used in both physiology and biology. Usage begun in the 1930’s through Hans Selye’s work and became popular in recent decades. Stress refers to the results due to failure of an organism... ?Stress Management Table of Contents Table of Contents Introduction to Stress 2 Stress Models 3 General...
Perceptual adaptation
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...Adaptation Prism adaptation is described as a phenomenon that the motor system adapts new visuo-patial coordinates instituted by prisms that displace the actual visual fields. When the prisms are eliminated, the strength of the adaptation can be measured through spatial deviation of the motor actions in an opposite visual displacement developed by prisms, a process referred as aftereffect. This study was developed to identify the variables that have an effect on the acquisition and maintenance of the aftereffects. Subjects were expected to throw balls to a target situated in front of them before, during, and after the lateral displacement of the visual field with prismatic... ? Psychology Perceptual...
Biological Adaptation
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...Adaption in Sensation and Perception The concept of biological adaptation has profound impact on how the experimenter understands psychology. Sensory adaptation is temporal change in the responses of the senses to a continuous stimulus (Boulpaep & Boron, 2003). The individual often perceives it as a change in sensation over time (Boulpaep & Boron, 2003). To demonstrate, the experimenter conducts a number of experiments to deepen our understanding of neural adaptation. Here, the experimenter reports the methods of and responses to these experiments. For each, the sensory system involved and how adaptation applies will be explained. In the first experiment, the experimenter... Experiments that Demonstrate...
Script Adaptation
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...Adaptation The first scene may begin with the protagonist’s (Bridget) monologue. She is a young slim girl, who is not satisfied with her life. There is no smile on her face. It is not very difficult to read pain and confusion on girl’s face and in her behavior. Bridget is going here and there along the scene. There are practically no lights on the stage. Everything is in green colours. This is a symbol of girl’s young age and inexperience. The protagonist sighs and says that everything is the same every day. Nothing new happens in her life. She gesticulates very actively and addresses the audience. Her eyes are constantly moving as if the girl is asking... Visual Arts and Film Studies   June Script...
Adaptation & Accountability
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...Adaptation The paper will discuss the issue of adaptation in relation to healthcare organizations. The main stress will be made on the necessity forsuch adaptation. The work is based on the specific example of Duke University Medical Center and Health System in North Carolina. Its story of success and adaptation might serve as a model for healthcare organizations which go through difficult times. According to Laubach (1997), health care systems should adapt to the developing of new technologies, especially in creating new systems of controlling and spreading the data, but as far as the number of healthcare organizations in private sector grows faster than that of public sector, they become... ...
Stress as it relates to health
18 pages (4500 words) , Download 2 , Research Paper
...adaptation syndrome’ theory, which is composed of three phases: the alarm reaction, the resistance stage, and the exhaustion stage (Harrari & Legge, 2001, 75). The first stage is similar to the fight or flight response of Cannon. Selye discovered that the intensified physical stimulation that takes place during this phase is associated with the endocrine system’s hormonal release. A hormone called ACTH is discharged by the pituitary gland and this pushes the discharge of cortisol, norepinephrine, and epinephrine by the adrenal glands. When such hormones enter the bloodstream, the alarm reaction... Stress and Health Research Paper of Stress research in social psychology has a long history. It evolved...
Adaptation & Accountability
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...Adaptation The paper will discuss the issue of adaptation in relation to healthcare organizations. The main stress will be made on the necessity forsuch adaptation. The work is based on the specific example of Duke University Medical Center and Health System in North Carolina. Its story of success and adaptation might serve as a model for healthcare organizations which go through difficult times. According to Laubach (1997), health care systems should adapt to the developing of new technologies, especially in creating new systems of controlling and spreading the data, but as far as the number of healthcare organizations in private sector grows faster than that of public sector, they become... ...
A literature review of hronic Fatigue Syndrome/ Myalic Encephalomyelites ( or encephalopathy, and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy/Psychotherapy
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...Syndrome/ Myalic Encephalomyelites (or encephalopathy) and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy/Psychotherapy A literature review of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ Myalic Encephalomyelites (or encephalopathy) and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy/Psychotherapy A literature review of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ Myalic Encephalomyelites (or encephalopathy) and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy/Psychotherapy Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a poorly understood condition and affects 250000 people in the UK and more than 1 million people in the United States by a new estimate just about to be published by the CDC (CFS, NHS; Harder, 2006). Known also as myalgic encephalomyelitis, CFS... A literature review of Chronic Fatigue...
Crowding and Psychological Stress
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...adaptation syndrome". (Wright 358) As you definitions are practicaaly different, but they agree that stress is negative and it is necessary to avoid them. Crowding is mentioned to be acute stress. Acute stress is immediate reaction of organism to danger or threat which is also known as "fight or flight response". This category also includes such psychological stresses as noise, isolation, hunger, infection and imaginary threat. All these kinds of stress, including crowding has psychological effect, because they act on the subconscious level and they are really dangerous for people's mentality. (Yao 859) Crowding is a potential source... Outline of the research the hypothesis of the research 2. general...
Psychology 23 questions
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...adaptation syndrome. Alarm Phase: this is the fight or flight response when the stressor is introduced. Resistance Phase: the body calms itself and the mind can... What are the three categories of stressful events? Provide an example of each of the three. Continuous Low-level Stress. This is the daily stress of life that involves things you have little control oner, like terrible traffic, or rude customers. Unfinished Tasks. These include bills that pile up, or messes that get bigger over time, and other ongoing problems that you never can get to. Major Life Events. These include deaths in the family, loss of ones home, and natural disasters. 2. Outline the three stages of the general adaptation sy...
Relationship between irritable bowel syndrome and stress
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...syndrome: Does gender matter? Journal of Psychosomatic Research 64 (2008) 583 – 587 Hungin, APS, L Chang, GR Locke, EH Dennis, V Barghout. 2005. “Irritable Bowel Syndrome in the United States: Prevalence, Symptom Patterns and Impact.” Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics 21 (11), 1365-1375. Hovdenak, Nils. 2007. “Loperamide Treatment of the Irritable Bowel Syndrome.” Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology. 22 (130) 81-84. Jailwala, J, T Imperiale, K Kroenke. 2000. “Pharmacologic Treatment of the Irritable Bowel Syndrome.” Annals of Internal Medicine 133 (2), 136-147. Katan M, Christ-Crain M. 2010. ...
Cultural Adaptation
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...Adaptation: An Interview Intercultural interaction is defined by Ellingsworth (1998) as the encounter of one person from a certain culture of another host culture. This phenomenon is increasingly becoming common as movements of people among societies for personal or business travels become necessary. Cross-cultural encounters especially those that take a long time can be a stressful experience and this field is the subject of our inquiry. The important point is to determine other people's experience in adapting to their host culture. In this paper, I am to relate the result of the interview that I conducted with a Filipino nurse acquaintance of mine. The experience was quite enlightening... Cultural...
Culture Adaptation
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...Adaptation Being an international there were a lot of struggles that I have been through adapting not just in school but also in the community when I first came to America. Since English is my second language and communication is necessary in everyday affairs, I found speaking to be the most challenging in my adaptation to my new environment. I once had the fear of communicating with native speakers because I thought no one might understand me and I might be laughable. I know that even if I spoke in English, my intonation was noticeably Asian and I sometimes felt funny listening to myself. Moreover, I was not very sure of the right words to use and my sentence construction was poor... ?Full Culture...
Carpenter Syndrome
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...Syndrome Research Literature “The Carpenter syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, polysyndactyly, obesity, and hypogonadism” (Frias, Felman and Rosenbloom 191). Typically, the preaxial polydactyly of the feet is a symptom of the disorder, although it has been argued that it is not an absolute requirement for a diagnose of Carpenter syndrome, which allows a comorbid diagnosis that includes Summitt and Goodman syndromes within the clinical spectrum of Carpenter’s (Rice 100). The most common craniofacial deformity found in Carpenter syndrome patients is a tower-spaded skull, which is known... as craniosynostosis. The obesity characteristic of...
Down Syndrome
21 pages (5250 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...syndrome. The world has had a series of challenges as far as medical health is the concern. Arguably, it cannot be dispensed that health related disorders remain one of the issues of serious concern for most health experts, as well as the general population since it affects everyone. As humans struggle through the ever increasing myriad of challenges, one thing they have to content with being, that genetic related diseases pose a significant threat to human survival. As such, genetic disorders comprise of various diseases that affect all age groups be it young, or old Genes, (Hindley 67). Currently, cure for genetic disorders remains to be one of the current issues of concern... as it is the...
Down Syndrome
10 pages (2500 words) , Download 1 , Research Paper
...syndrome Down syndrome Introduction Chromosomes are the basic unit of cells which contain the organized form of DNA in a coiled form. These chromosomes undergo different type of abnormalities during the genesis of human beings. Chromosomes are units which are transferred from parent to offspring through different processes. In certain cases this transfer is not successful and this leads to chromosomal abnormalities. These abnormalities occur due to different reasons such as radiations or chemicals. Primary abnormalities in the chromosomal structure are related to four classes which are deletions, inversions, translocations and ring chromosome. In this assignment the particular emphasis would...
Ripley Syndrome
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...Syndrome In our environment, it’s not all we see, that is actually what is there. Appearances are often deceptive. People appearing to live a small kind of life are sometimes great individual. The way people are dressed up might not actually depict the kind of person they are and personality is often faked. All these highlight towards an expression of different idea or personality from what people see us to be. The issue surrounding the Ripley syndrome is that of different personality from what a person should portray. Ripley syndrome is considered to be one of the several pervasive developmental disorders which remain unclear, controversial and not fully understood pervasive... 10 August Ripley...
KlverBucy syndrome
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...syndrome. This disorder occurs in man as a consequence of bilateral surgical ablations of medial temporal lobes or following herpes simplex encephalitis. "deficits in the Kluver-Bucy syndrome have been described as an incapacity for adaptive social behavior, and a loss of recognition of the significance of persons and events. Such patients shows an empty blandness, an absence of emotion or concern... Kluver - Bucy syndrome Kluver - Bucy Syndrome Epidem: Rare Sx: Full syndrome contains "psychic blindness," "hypermetamorphosis," "hyperorality," and "hypersexuality". Definition: A constellation of symptoms resulting from bilateral temporal lobectomy in humans and monkeys that inc...
Down Syndrome
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...Syndrome Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder that hampers the mental andphysical development of those afflicted. It results when an individual has an extra 21st chromosome, i.e. a total of 47 chromosomes, rather than the usual 46 chromosomes. This condition is also known as trisomy 21. In those born with DS, the extra chromosome interrupts the normal growth and functioning of cells. Babies born with the syndrome are smaller and have fewer brain cells (Bowman-Kruhm 12). Those suffering from the syndrome are easy to recognize as the disorder manifests itself in a number of physical ways, altering the outward appearance of those suffering from it. They tend to appear short and heavy... ? 12 April Down...
Metabolic Syndrome
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...Syndrome submitted Metabolic syndrome (MetS) consists of pathological conditions that involve arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and visceral adiposity, which lenience the progress of cardiovascular diseases. Metabolic syndrome is increasing in first and third world nations, in both male and female and in adults and children. The prevalence of MetS depends on the measures applied to establish inclusion and the composition of the targeted population (ethnicity, age, race, sex). The most used criteria are those of the NCEP-ATP III, and IDF. According to the research carried out on US residents using the NCEP-ATP III standards, the unadjusted and age-adjusted prevalence... ? Metabolic...
Metabolic Syndrome
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...Syndrome due: Concept map Genetic factors, poor diet, inadequate exercise Adipose cell enlargement & infiltration of macrophages into adipose tissue Release of proinflammatory cytokines Adipose tissue dysfunction & insulin resistance Inadequate insulin production & beta cell dysfunction Obesity related insulin resistance Increase in free fatty acid levels & changes in insulin distribution Abnormalities in insulin secretion, insulin signaling, improved glucose disposal, proinflammatory cytokines The symptoms presented by the patient reveal that he is suffering from Metabolic Syndrome. Diagnosis of this condition was based on his laboratory exam... Metabolic...
Koro Syndrome
10 pages (2500 words) , Essay
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...Syndrome Introduction Depersonalization is a strange feeling in which a person may experience an alien feeling of unreality and peculiarity about themselves. They can even feel their body to be radically changing in somewhat bizarre manner. These kinds of experiences are quite common in our society. Gentle forms of “out-of-the-body” experiences generally fall within the dissociative disorder categories. In different parts of the world, there have been proofs of various disorders that have been marked as instances of de-personalization, which differs greatly from those typically seen in the West. For example, there has been the existence of varied anxiety...
Effective Teaching Methods that can be Implored to Integrate a Child with Down's Syndrome into a Mainstream Primary School in Ir
15 pages (3750 words) , Essay
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...adaptation of the learning environment of such students. Avoiding any form of distraction is another strategy that serves to enhance the learning environment of students suffering from these conditions (Lane & Stratford, 1987 p40). Students suffering from Down's syndrome are easily distracted, since their rate of concentration and comprehension is low. Considering that students suffering from this disorder have poor long-term memory, it is vital for the teachers to breakdown, the subjects into simpler sections that can easily be understood (Down, 1999 p259). Another challenge facing such students is lack of coordination, which results to difficulty in undertaking... ?Effective teaching methods that can...
Asperger Syndrome
18 pages (4500 words) , Essay
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...SYNDROME Asperger Syndrome SCHOOL In 1944, Asperger syndrome, a neuro-developmental disorder, was d after Austrian physician, Hans Asperger. Asperger syndrome is under the categorization of Autism Spectrum Disorder or Pervasive Developmental Disorder. The brain functioning of an Asperger syndrome individual develops at a usual range but with marked deficits in social interaction and communication. Asperger syndrome, which is more prevalent in boys, is rarely diagnosed and often mistaken as high-functioning autism. Because the cause is uncertain, there is no precise remedy for the disorder. Treatment approaches are primarily for improvement, rehabilitation and education... on appropriate...
Usher syndrome
3 pages (750 words) , Research Paper
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...Syndrome Usher syndrome refers to a deaf-blindness condition. Patients with Usher syndrome have hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). RPis characterized by difficulty in balance, loss of peripheral vision, night blindness, retinal degeneration, and finally “tunnel vision” (National Institutes of Health, 2011). Usher syndrome accounts for fifty percent of deafness and blindness cases. It occurs in 1 of 23,000 births in the US (Boughman, Vernon, & Shaver, 1983), and 1 in 12,500 in Germany (Otterstedde, Spandau, Blankenagel, Kimberling, & Reisser, 2001). Other countries have reported prevalence within this range. Usher syndrome is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder; symptoms... of...
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