Discuss the validity of the following assertion: Without the cooperation of the French, American victory in the Revolution would not have been possible.
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...American Victory in the Revolution would not Have Been Possible’ France actively took part in the American Revolutionary War which lasted from 1775 to 1783. The thirteen American colonies wanted to get their independence from Britain. France officially entered this conflict in 1778 as it perceived the battle as being an embodiment of the Spirit of the Enlightenment that was then spreading all over Europe. Previously, France had been defeated during the French and Indian hostilities, forcing it to withdraw its troops from American soil. It is a possibility that it saw in the thirteen colonies a potential ally that might... Module History and Political Science: ‘Without the Cooperation of the French,...
How were the American colonies (united states) able to defeat Great Britain in the war for Independence. How did the leadership of George Washington contribute to this victory?
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...Americans in the warfare (Simmons, 2005). The late president, George Washington, commanded the Continental Army of the United States during the Revolutionary War. He was extremely influential in the warfare, which brought victory to the United States. Washington had a leading political and military task in the American Revolution (Rickard, 2003). Washington’s involvement started as early as 1767. After the warfare erupted with the Battles of Concord and Lexington in April 1775, he... American Colonies Defeat to Great Britain American Colonies Defeat to Great Britain Several issues converged to secure success forAmericans in the Revolutionary War. The locals diverged from the techniques by which warfare...
In part because it united all Americans behind a moral aim and in victory, World War 2 lives on in modern American memory as the
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...victory, there has been discontent as to whether indeed the movie was not one sided and produced within the realm and ideals of racism.3 During the world war two, the film came out to show the heroics and bravery of the American unit of outnumbered soldiers, therefore depicting the bravery and determined nature of the United States army in the war. This film marked the emergence of a genre of war films. The multi ethnic composition of the 13 men consisted of a religious, neophyte and learned men.4 This movie became an influential piece of art that achieved success in a lot more ways than the producers had thought possible... ? WW II in Modern American Memory AS the 'Good War' Based On the Film Bataan WW...
. In considering the time period of 1865 to the present, is the American story one of oppression or success? Victory on the par
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...American History since 1865(Oppression)        American History since 1865 Oppression) Introduction America is a nation that has undergone many transformations like the industrial revolution and the Europeans colonization. In the process of these transformations, many people have suffered while other have benefitted from the changing economic and political environments of America. In fact, since 1865, there has been lack of equitable distribution of national wealth culminating in criminal activities aimed at obtaining the wealth preserved for the few powerful elite in the American society. This led to social gaps, which have been the root...
American and Japanese Motorcycles.
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...American Motorcycles – A Breed Apart This is a class of bikes not found anywhere else. Of course there are good standard and sport bikes among American made motorcycles (Buell is a good example) but the outstanding ones are the Harley Davidson, Indian, Victory, choppers and all kind of custom motorcycles. To bikers around the world, Harley-Davidson is the motorcycle which has been around for a hundred years and can be claimed as the founder pf motorcycles. This machine has evolved... American and Japanese Motorcycles Japanese Motorcycles – Dream Machines In the 1950s Japanese motorcycles were being designed to be bigger and betterperformance motorcycles. They then made their way to Europe and later made...
Victory
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...Victory in “The Champion of the World” number The Significance of Victory in “The Champion of the World” Victory, in “The Champion of the World” is at the surface, the victory of Joe Louis, the “Brown Bomber” against a white contender. At a metaphorical level, however, the victory signifies the victory of the aspirations of a generation of African Americans who were guaranteed equality by the law but not by the society. This excerpt, like most of Maya Angelou’s writings, highlights the inequalities that members of the black race in America and other parts of the world have had to face. The victory of Joe Louis is for all those who have gathered near the store run by Uncle Willie... The Significance of...
The Patriots Victory at Saratoga
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...American History to 1877 The Patriots Victory at Saratoga The Revolutionary war was one of the greatest battles that that have ever been fought in America. The war marked a new era in the American history as it symbolized the Americans’ rebirth as a nation. The Battle of Saratoga was a long struggle of the British army to take control over the Hudson River. The battle was punctuated by two important clashes between the Americans and the British. The Patriots victory at the battle of Saratoga was an important event as it is considered the turning point in the course of American Revolution. The British wanted to suppress the inner rebellions in the country in order to prevent... ? of the of the HIST101 –...
How the Battle of Saratoga Changed the Course of the War
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...Americans and eventually led to American victory in the revolution. To be specific, the victory in the Battle of Saratoga helped the Americans to gain confidence and fight against British colonization. Thesis statement: The Battle of Saratoga (the American Revolution) changed the course of the war (the American War of Independence) because America was able to gain military aid and support from France, Spain and Holland, which eventually led to the transformation... identify that the defeat of the British colonizers during the American Revolution helped the Americans to gain confidence and fight for their ultimate freedom. The American...
How the battle of Saratoga changed the course of the war.
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...Americans and eventually led to American victory in the revolution. To be specific, the victory in the Battle of Saratoga helped the Americans to gain confidence and fight against British colonization. Thesis statement: The Battle of Saratoga (the American Revolution) changed the course of the war (the American War of Independence) because America was able to gain military aid and support from France, Spain and Holland, which eventually led to the transformation of America... How the battle of Saratoga changed the of the war The Battle of Saratoga can be considered as an important battle within the history ofthe United States of America. The Battle of Saratoga accelerated the revolutionary spirit of the...
Yorktown-American Revolutionary War
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...American and French soldiers against only 7,600 British soldiers. Basically, this made it difficult for the British soldiers to continue with the war, particularly after a few minutes of the war led to the loss of about 500 British soldiers against only 80 American and 200 French soldiersvii. As a result, the British soldiers had no option but to surrender leading to their loss of victory in the revolutionary war. In the event that the British won the revolutionary battle, probably America’s independence would not have come so soonviii. The attainment of America’s independence just a few years after the war clearly points... ? Yorktown-American Revolutionary War Yorktown-American Revolutionary War Part...
American improvement in the conduct of military operations in Europe.
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...American improvement in the conduct of military operations in Europe Ever since the First and Second World Wars, the United States have made such remarkable improvements in the conduct of military operations in Europe that today it has become the unchallenged global military power. With Germany’s invasion of Poland in 1939, then France in 1940, and the Soviet Union in 1941, the United States initiated compulsory peacetime military training and introduced the army’s “Victory Program” that aimed at strengthening the nation’s military power and creating an appropriate balance between ground and air forces. After the Second World War, the United States emerged as a global... superpower in terms...
American Revolution
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...victory against the British Empire. This is by convincing the French government to offer military assistance to the American colonies in 1998. This assistance was of great importance to the colonies, and this is because the French had the same military capability as the British, and on this basis, their support guaranteed the colonies that they could win the war (McCullough, 26). Through his diplomatic skills, Benjamin Franklin was also able to make the World powers recognize America as an independent country, through the signing of the Paris Treaty in 1781. Apart from the diplomatic skills of Benjamin Franklin, one of the major factors that made the French to join... American Revolution The American...
The Obama Victory
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...Victory: A Symbol of American Freedom and African-American Struggle The victory of the Democratic Party’s Senator Barack Obama in the 2008 Presidential Elections against the Republican Party’s nominee Senator John McCain was considered as a monumental feat in the history of American politics. This event marked not only the return of the Democrats into the highest seat of administrative power but most importantly the triumph of African-Americans with concern to their participation in the nation’s politics. Looking back at the collective memory of the African-American people in the United States, it can be said that they had gone through a great amount of struggle to obtain civil... ? (YOUR (THE The Obama...
Causes of Obama's victory
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...victory was a balance of winning more white voters than John Kerry and doing substantially better with African Americans and Hispanics. Obama’s victory is not as huge as it seems not as narrow as claimed by the right wing commentators. An analysis of the data shows that his victory has come at the “centre” and despite accusations of “socialism” and “Joe the Plumber” he managed to carry a lot of white working class men and women with him. The fact is that the Obama victory was pervasive and cut across almost all demographic subgroups. However, there are some prominent groups that warrant... INTRODUCTION The election of Barack Obama as the 44th president of the United s was a historic event in the...
Explain the nature of American improvement in the conduct of military operations in Europe.
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...American improvement in the conduct of military operations in Europe Ever since the First and Second World Wars, the United States have made such remarkable improvements in the conduct of military operations in Europe that today it has become the unchallenged global military power. With Germany’s invasion of Poland in 1939, then France in 1940, and the Soviet Union in 1941, the United States initiated compulsory peacetime military training and introduced the army’s “Victory Program” that aimed at strengthening the nation’s military power and creating an appropriate balance between ground and air forces. After the Second World War, the United States emerged as a global superpower... Explain the nature of...
The Impossible Victory: Vietnam
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...victory: Vietnam The international perception of the US in terms of wealth changed a lot after her invasion of Vietnam, since the US was seen as an aggressive nation and was using her wealth and might to humiliate a poor peasantry country that had committed no act of aggression against her. The US was no longer popular as before and her fame nosedived not only at the international front but also at her own soil whereby she was faced by many dissents, strikes and several protests against the Vietnam war from her own people.The power of the US was also greatly questioned and came under sharp criticism. As a superpower, and a vibrant democracy, the US was supposed to be not only... of freedom of...
Describe the evolution of American policies and the actions taken toward Native Americans between 1816 and 1830. Could the trans-Appalachian interior have been settled in any other fashion by American settlers? Why or Why not?
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...American government. Pursuant to this policy, the US legislature passed laws like the Indian Country Crimes Act in 1817 while the American armed forces attacked the Seminoles and defeated them in the First Seminole War.2 With the American victory, the US government had cemented its supremacy over the Indians who were enslaved by the white men. It is believed that in the year 1820, an estimated twenty thousand (20,000) Indians were made slaves by the white men which slavery was apparently sanctioned... Evolution of American Policies on Native Americans (1816-1830) The Native Americans is a very most resilient nation. Despite colonization and oppression, they have remained true to their traditional customs ...
American History to 1877
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...American victory in 1781 (Lanning, 2008, p. 246). (2) Union policy over slavery changed throughout the course of the war because of internal rifts... 1) The American War of Independence was a make or break situation for the colonials. It is true that it was not inevitable. In the of the war,people on either side risked so much—live, property, and honor—in order to attain their respective goals. Waging the war entailed risks as well as promises for the colonials: they could lose their freedom entirely if they lost, or ensure independence, self-governance and peaceful command of their own resources thereafter if they won (Mabry, 2003). Following the defeat of George Washington’s Continental Army in the...
American history
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...American became more involved in its own neighbourhood, this conflict would play a very influential role. America would not focus on building local capacity and democracy, but would instead treat Puerto Rico and Cuba effectively as colonies. Following the American victory... SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR The Mormon Church and the Spanish-American War: An End to Selective Pacifism While much has been written about the Spanish-American war and the cultural and political milieu of the time, little scholarship discusses the growing influence of the Mormon Church at this time. This article aims to remedy that oversight. The author discusses how the war shaped the Church of Latter Day Saints view of war and conflict...
American History Symbolism
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...American victory in Japan, this sculpture would serve as an iconic representation not only of American victory in its successful revolution, but also its continued commitment to freedom, liberty, and the republican values which it had waged war in order to acquire for American citizens. We have defined both the classical conceptions and the early American conceptions of what republicanism and what values it entails, according to both ancient accounts and those given by Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. In doing so, we have realized... American history is saturated with instances of effective, pervasive symbolism: the Statue of Liberty, the Capitol building (Bowling), the Eye of Providence, and so on....
HIST - Which battle in the Civil War contributed most to the Union's victory?
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...victory? The Union’s victory was offered by a number of battles. The battle, which contributed most, is the battle of Chattanooga or Chattanooga campaign. After the Union’s defeat at the battle of Chickamauga, Abraham Lincoln ordered an aid of fifty thousand Union reinforcements. Soon the city of Chattanooga has got a central position in the American civil war. The battle of Chattanooga not only contributed towards Union’s victory but also furnished way for the Union’s military movement to the south. The losses in the battle of Chattanooga are much smaller as compared to the other battles of American civil war. The battle... of Chattanooga gave a way to the Sherman to look into the Atlanta...
How did the Spanish-American War change America's role in the world? In what ways did America's global role stay the same after the war?
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...American War in April 1898. American victory was declared in August. Under the Treaty of Paris, in December 1898, Cuba became an American Protectorate under the Platt Amendment of 1902, Puerto Rico and Guam were received from Spain as indemnity and the Philippines was ceded to America after the Battle of Manila Bay, for $ twenty million.3 The repercussions of the Spanish-American War led to the annexation of the Philippines... History 101 Short Paper The Spanish-American War: Turning Point in America’s Global Role. The Spanish-American War of 1898 proved to be the turning point in changing America’s global role, and marked America’s irrevocable start upon the path to becoming a world power. Until the...
The American War of Independence
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...American victory was a little short of a standing miracle".1 Ferling went on to say that the skirmishes and battles "often hinged on intangibles such as leadership under fire, heroism, good fortune, blunders, tenacity and surprise".2 The British forces all throughout the war played the aggressor , employing time-tested strategies and tactics that it had used before against the French, Spanish and Irish foes. The colonials, meanwhile, a complete tyro in any warfare... 1 TACTICS PAPER The American War of Independence was concluded not because of the readiness, the might or magnificence of the military forces but because the 'inferior' party outmaneuvered the 'superior party. This paper answers the...
Empires were once considered good, stable places to live. Who or what was to blame for the American rebellion against British Empire according to the Declaration of Independence? After declaring independence in 1776, how did the colonists go about framing
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...Americans in North America. By the year 1778, the American’s efforts of westward expansion were popular worldwide. It had spread all across Europe. It was the American victory in Saratoga that pushed France to sign a Treat of Alliance with the US on 6th February, 1778. Spain later allied with France in 1779. Earlier on these two countries had declined to acknowledge the American independence as that would have encouraged their very own colonies to rebel. In actual sense, both countries had silently supported the American Revolution in an effort to weaken the British power altogether. Nevada statehood is essentially tied to the American westward expansion because it was a major contributor... ...
Overview of the campaign at the battle of King's Mountain 1780
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...American victory in the Revolutionary War or the American War of Independence (1775-1783). It was the first major patriot victory after the successful British invasion of Charleston, South Carolina, in May 1780 under Lord Cornwallis. As Cornwallis prepared to launch the invasion of North Carolina, British Colonel Patrick Ferguson was dispatched with a force of about 800 American Loyalists to subdue the ‘Overmountain Men’ west of the Blue Ridge, who were patriots and harbored retreating rebels from the Battle of Camden. Ferguson sent a warning to the frontiersmen... The Battle of King’s Mountain. The Battle of King’s Mountain. The Battle of King’s Mountain, fought on 7 October, 1780, was a decisive...
The American Military Failure in Vietnam
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...American society. The fact that the United States never had a real sense of purpose in this war, and the fact that the Vietnamese were able to bog down the American military, are the key reasons why the Vietnamese were victorious in this conflict. The conflict, of course, began when the French decided to release their colonial claims to Vietnam. The French army was driven from Vietnam in 1954, resulting in the Geneva Peace Accords. This created a temporary partition of Vietnam at the seventeenth parallel, until 1956, when nationwide elections would be held. While the Communist powers in the Soviet Union and China did want the entire nation... Your Your Crisis of Confidence: The American Military...
"Victory Motorcycles"
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...Victory Motorcycles For the case of Victory Motorcycles, the company has opted to select the diversification strategy so as to survive in the present day market. As seen in the research conducted by Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson, the company has a variety of products that has seen a diverse market for its clientele base (420-31). In terms of its market share, the company has a diversified market that has seen a great percentage of its products being distributed in different parts of the world. Through diversification, Victory Motorcycles managed to deliver over 50% horsepower as opposed to its competitors (Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson 425). The...
Guadalcanal Battle
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...victory After the victory at ‘Battle of Midway’ American forces started planning for recapturing of Pacific Islands from Japanese. The first event in this direction was the Guadalcanal battle. The use of islands, like Guadalcanal, Tulagi and Florida in Southern Solomon by Japanese forces was proving a major threat to supply routes between USA, Australia and New Zealand. The battle began for the sole purpose of ensuring safety for these routes. There was difference of opinion in Japan over the importance of this island. While many army officers thought it better to manage the existing and over... Guadalcanal Battle Background Allied forces launched the first major offensive against Japanese Empire on 07 A...
American political history
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...American political history American political history has changed a lot after the 2001, 9/11 incident. Earlier, it was the cold war with former Soviet Union which caused headaches to America. The cold war was all about political conflicts, military tensions, proxy wars or economic competitions between America and Soviet Union during the period between 1947 to1991. The Cold War ended after the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, giving an absolute victory to United States Michael Gorbachev, former Soviet communist president, contributed indirectly to American victory. Gorbachev’s policies like perestroika and...
Victory Motorcycles
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...Victory Motorcycles Victory Motorcycles employs the diversification business level strategy in its operations globally. The company produces a variety of products such as motorcycles, watercrafts and snowmobiles, which have enabled it to have a higher diversification in terms of products. Moreover, the company is has also diversified in terms of market and thus, has established markets globally, spanning from America to China, Australia Russia and Brazil. In addition, to succeed in using the diversification strategy, the company provides high quality and innovative motorcycles designs, which are tailor-made for its target markets (Hitt, Ireland & Hoskisson, 2012). Moreover... Business Level Strategy:...
Was the American Revolution really a "revolution" or was it merely a War for Independence?
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...American Revolution is primarily an outcome of their compilation of the war events. Historians of the 19th century mutually held a consensus that the American Revolution was morally justified. They were of the view that American victory opened the gate to freedom. The determinists of the early 20th century presented the second school of thought regarding the American Revolution. They thought that the revolution revolved around the conflict of class. The economic motivations were hard to be justified with the widespread rhetoric about equality and republicanism. The determinists analyzed the revolution as more than just an endeavor to gain independence. They thought of it as a means... ? 4 October Was the ...
"Explain how the Cold War influenced the American government's decision to fight in Vietnam?"
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...American victory over Japan in 1945, the U.S. and the Soviet Union became engaged in a battle over political ideology and power that played out on a world-wide scale, the Cold War. Communism was America’s enemy and after witnessing the Soviets build a wall in Berlin and continue to aspire to conquer other Eastern European nations, which came to be known as ‘satellite countries’ of the Soviet Union, the U.S. drew a metaphorical line in the sand in Vietnam. Many thousands... The Cold War influenced America’s Involvement in Vietnam The war in Vietnam demonstrated that there arelimitations to a military superpower’s capabilities. This is a lesson the defunct Roman Empire never learned and a similar fate...
Roe versus Wade: a Victory as well as Defeat
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...Victory as well as a Defeat In 1973 the United s Supreme court decided on a case that fundamentally affected many aspects of American society and culture. This decision on Roe v. Wade essentially made the Supreme Court decide upon restriction on a woman’s body. This two year trial pitted colleague against colleague, as well as families against each other. What started as a case of a single mother from Texas ended with national contemplation of what life meant and who had the power to decide. This decision affected the way many people saw the nation. All in all, Roe v. Wade changed three fundamental elements of the United States public life: how women felt about their bodies... . Both of these...
Assess the role of Lend-lease in securing Allied victory
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...American aid to Russia followed only after the victories of the Red Army on the eastern front. Lend – Lease Act The Lend - Lease Act was approved by the US Congress on 11th March 1941. It was the arrangement through which all war supplies that included food, machinery and other services apart from weapons were... ?Contents Contents Introduction 2 Background 2 Lend – Lease Act 3 Impact 4 Repayment 7 Conclusion 8 Bibliography 10 Introduction History has provedthat military battles and conflicts have been triggered by economic, political and social reasons. However, it has been rare that a single policy or act has had an impact across these factors. The Lend – Lease Act of 1941 is one such piece of...
Victory Culture and World War II on Film: Analysis of Clips from Stagecoach (1939, dir. John Ford), and Bataan (1943, dir. Tay Garnett)
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...Victory Culture” and World War II on Film: Analysis of Clips from Stagecoach and Bataan (1943) The Stagecoat and Bataan (1943) present the ic “victory culture” narrative. Both films featured white Americans as the central characters and protagonists to whom audience sympathy is drawn upon. Stagecoach is based on a four-wheeled enclosed coach used for passengers and goods drawn by four horses. It is noticeable that only white men and women were passengers of this vehicle, making the scene exclusively and solely occupied by whites. Indians were depicted as villains, as when Dallas (Claire Trevor) finally agrees to Ringo (John Wayne) on marriage in a condition of giving up his plan to take... ...
The Impossible Victory: Vietnam
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...American policy makers and citizens... Contrasting perspectives on the Vietnam War: The Vietnam War that was started by President John F. Kennedy and later continued by President Lyndon Johnson was one of the most debated and discussed war in the period after the Second World War.  At the time of its initiation, there was hardly any public protest.  Even the leading intellectuals of the time were either in support of it or indifferent to it.  The only question that was discussed in the mainstream media and scholarship of the time was whether the United States can win the war in Vietnam.  Howard Zinn was an exception to this rule in that he considered this question to be irrelevant.  He reckoned that...
Why Decisive Victory is Much More Difficult to Achieve in Modern Warfare?
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...Victory is Much More Difficult to Achieve in Modern Warfare" Achieving decisive victory in war is much more difficult today. In the past, countries or nations will use all of their resources to destroy another country's or nation's capability to wage war. The 20th century term to describe this type of war is 'Total' war. The principles of 'Total' war was formulated by Carl von Clausewitz (June 1, 1780-November 16, 1831), a Prussian general who wrote the book Vom Kriege (On War). The horrific consequence of 'Total' war has been the distruction of civilians and civilian infrastructure being the targets for destroying a nation's capability to wage war. The American Civil War is one... "Why Decisive...
Hollow Victory, On the Brink of the Revolution
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...Victory When Churchill referred to the Allied forces victory in World War I as “bought so dear as to be distinguishable from defeat” he was acknowledging victory left the Allied forces as broken as the defeated enemies. As Henig (2002) points out, despite the “financial consequences” of the First World War, it is primarily “remembered for its huge toll of suffering and human life” (p. 34). In fact, the Allies lost more men than the Central Powers. The total death toll for the Allied powers was 5 million whereas the total death toll for the Central Powers was 3.3 million (History Learning Site, 2012). In addition, 13 million from among the Allied powers were wounded compared... Assignment A Hollow...
Jefferson's view about the Missouri Compromise
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...victory and thus the Missouri Compromise can be said to have strengthened the Union infinitely. The Missouri Compromise was not the only source of growing tensions in the US. In the 1840s, the American-Mexican war took place in response to the Mexican designs for the state of Texas (one of the states supporting... Jeffersons View about the Missouri Compromise of 1820 The Missouri Compromise of 1820 was part of an ongoing attempt to divide the United s intotwo areas: one that was pro-slavery (the Southern territories) and one that was anti-slavery (the Northern territories). The Missouri Compromise was so called because it involved the admittance of the (proposed) Missouri state as one that was...
The reasons why the British, from Parliament to the Expeditionary Forces, were defeated by a less trained and weaker American army in the American Revolutionary
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...Americans’ fortune began to change following the victories at Saratoga and Germantown in 1777. These important first triumphs gave increased credibility to what had previously been widely considered as an unorganized, minor uprising certain to be vanquished by the mighty British army. By 1778, France had become convinced that Britain stood the chance of being defeated. Wanting nothing more than this, America’s first formal alliance was with the French. Centuries-long enemy of Britain, France was recently defeated on American soil by the British (1763) and had been secretly funneling money, arms and clothing to the colonists from the beginning... Why Britain lost the War with the Colonies The...
Who Won the War of 1812?
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...American armies, an argument for the United States' victory can be made, both because of the Battle of New Orleans and the destruction of the Indian confederation. The War of 1812 was incited by nationalist sentiments and America's determined quest for independence. While the country had emerged victories from the American Revolution of 1783, Britain did not withdraw from the Great Lakes... The war of 1812, waged between Britain and the United s, lasted for close to three years and symbolised a national stand against foreign intervention and a declaration of sovereignty (Latimer, 2007). Yet, it has commanded very little attention among historians. In fact, while the majority of Americans are familiar...
The U.S. Military Fighting Forces in World War II (European vs. Pacific Theaters)
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...American forces thus resulting in the near defeat by eastern bloc. The war presented several real life factors that presented differences and difficulties to the American war thus stifling the American commitment to victory. Among such differences in the Geographic and environmental conditions, the types of enemy, the differences in the logistical tactics and the technology... of the opponent often presented the American forces with dire challenges thus compelling the use of the archaic military weapon in a bid to end the war sooner. However, some of the technological differences made the United States more superior than most of their enemies. Furthermore, despite the...
How far was foreign intervention responsible for the Nationalist victory in the Spanish Civil War?
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...victory for Francisco Franco was to the benefit of Britain’s best interests in Spain. As a result, he devoted all his time and energy to generously support the Nationalists. As for the United States’ position, it was not so much different from that of Britain. Apparently, the former seems to be neutral, yet surveys have indicated that the Nationalists got important and an instinctive support from some of the greatest American companies. Section E: Conclusion From all that has been said, we come to the conclusion that foreign intervention has really changed the course of the Civil War in Spain. Thus, thanks to the strong support which the Nationalists got... How Far Was Foreign Intervention Responsible...
Victory Arch of Titus
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...VICTORY ARCH OF TITUS Full November 12, 2008 Introduction Prominently surviving durably through the rage of the ages at the eastern end of the Roman Forum is the famous Arch of Titus. Since it was constructed in AD 81, the cut stone brickwork building has been an enduring monument to the Roman victory over the Jews. It has been a symbol of success and a remembrance of the glory of Titus Vespasian Augustus. With its straightforward yet firm example of Roman engineering, it has inspired architects, provided historians with information about the life of Rome and awed artists with its complex relief and statue. This is the well known Arch of Titus. Background...
The Role Of The Lend-Lease Program In Allied Victory During WWII
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...VICTORY DURING WWII "The British gave time, the Americans gave money and the Russians gave blood." - Joseph Stalin The initial American policy at the outset of the Second World War was officially one of isolationist neutrality. It shouldn't have been our war; didn't have to be through any obvious necessity by September, 1939. Not unless the Axis aggressors were determined to make it so. That fiction of neutrality became threatened by a long string of Nazi victories in Europe. The administration of President Franklin Roosevelt soon began to look for options give aid to Britain while remaining out of the war in a strictly military sense. 'If your neighbor's... ?THE ROLE OF THE LEND-LEASE PROGRAM IN ALLIED...
Diplomatic, political and military reasons for the United States victory in the Revolutionary War.
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...victory in the Revolutionary War Military Reasons The revolutionary war is documented as the most historic war of the American people as it brought them independence. It happened from 1775 to 1783 and involved the Americans resisting the British rule (Crawford 297). General Thomas Gage was the British commander in 1775 when a rebellion of property owners emerged and started to surround the British based in Boston. This shows that every American was ready to go to war to avoid the enslavement by the British. As news of the rebellious activities in Massachusetts reached Philadelphia, George Washington was selected to lead... the Continental army, a well organised army (Neimeyer 6). The...
American-Spanish War
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...American War (SAW) is one of the most important foreign wars. The result of the war was the victory for the United States, and this victory became possible due to the hard work and efforts of far-sighted Americans, particularly known as “Navalists”. The contemporary world would have looked quite different today, if the United States had not won this war. The United States was able to defeat Spain so easily because some far-sighted Americans... ? Why Did the United s Defeat Spain so Swiftly and at Relatively Low Cost in Time, Money and Lives? [Institute’s Why Did the United States Defeat Spain so Swiftly and at Relatively Low Cost in Time, Money and Lives? In the history of the United States, the...
Why did the American Revolution take place? Describe the basic nature of the conflict between the colonies and England. How did the colonies react to Britains new policies after the Seven Years War? When do you think the point of no return
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...American allies into the war in 1778 and 1779 consecutively following the American victory at Saratoga. Over 7000 British soldiers were captures during the Franco-American siege at Yorktown in 1781. This was the last blow to the British and though light fighting continued throughout 1982 peace was now being seen at the end of the tunnel. The treaty of Paris was signed in 1783 and it ended the war declaring the United States of America a sovereign state. Conclusion The American Revolution was facilitated by the imposition of taxes by the British government on the colonies. The colonies were against the whole idea as they felt that without being represented in the national... Why the American Revolution...
1967 war is it a defeat or a victory to the Arabs
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...victory for Israelis meant that their territory grew by three times with around 1 million Arab populations coming directly under the rule of the Israelis (Ross, 2004). The defeat of Arabs meant that the Israeli territory expanded 300 kilometres to the South, 60 kilometres to the East and 20 kilometres to the North. Conclusion The cause of the outbreak of war of 1967 was due to the underlying tensions between the Israeli and the Arab states over the years. This was the third war between Israel and the Arabs. Although the UN peacemakers forced a peace treaty between these two regions, there were several terrorist attacks and military... ?1967 war: cause of conflict between Arab and Israel The six-day war...
Essay questions
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...Americans take control of Spanish possessions in the Caribbean such as Cuba, Puerto Rica, and other islands, but as the war expanded so would the remit of the Monroe Doctrine. The United States would gain control of the Philippines, far from its own shore, and attempt to remake the Spanish colonialism political system in its own image. The result would be a bloody conflict fought with Filipino insurgents that would take America many years to quell. Following the American victory over Spain and the taking of the Philippines, there was a great deal of tension between the U.S. and the locals. This came to a head in 1899 when... 1. Discuss the main arguments for and against American expansion as reflected...
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