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Anthropological Perspective on Education Reform in Chicago
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...society (187). This activity is known as citizenship education (Levinson, Bradley and Pollock 187) and aims to promote the participation of individuals in critical decisions of their community or the state. In terms of theory, the relationship between education and anthropology can be evaluated using different approaches. The Functional perspective focuses on the role of education ‘in transforming existing social norms’ (Sharma 24). At the same time, the above perspective emphasizes on the value of education both for the society and for the individual (Sharma 24). The Liberal perspective is based on the view that education is primarily used ‘for promoting... ? Anthropological Perspective on Education...
Anthropological perspective
3 pages (750 words) , Download 0 , Term Paper
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...culturally refined. It was the racial and national influences that defined these culture performances into what they are now known today. Olympic Games attract much greater attention than fairs or zoos, and yet about a century ago the games were only considered a minor event. Olympic history brings light to the origins of modern social science. Both Anthropology and this contest of sports emerged from a mixture of theories influenced by cultural factors. Some of these factors included imperialism, colonization, industrialization, and capitalism. (Brownell 2... ?Cameron [Manager] 24 November Race and Sports Long has there been a debate over the of race and its impact on sports and athletic ability. Still...
An analysis of an aspect of human culture from an anthropological viewpoint.
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...culture from an anthropological viewpoint The world has undergone serious development in cultural, economic, political and academic circles since mid 1980s. However, no one has bothered to question the cultural erosion that has taken place as a result of this development. The paper, ‘Cultural Anthropological Perspective of Development Re – examined’, written by Abdulla Al Manun, argues that the development process which has been extensively carried out since mid 1980s has resulted in the expansion and penetration of the traditions. It has further fostered the subordination of poor and developing nations by the rich and developed nations of the western world... ? An analysis of the aspect of human culture ...
An analysis of an aspect of human culture from an anthropological viewpoint.
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...Culture: An anthropological Perspective Ethni certainly has a very important role in the world politics today. According to many scholars, the terms; culture, ethnicity, and conflict are closely linked. Studies reveal that where there is a sense of culture, it is followed by conflict. In fact, as Eller points out, ethnicity can be termed as the product of tradition, value systems, and history, as well as of contemporary circumstances and interest in society (7-8). A close observation of history proves that ethnicity does not always lead to conflicts in society. However, when certain situations arise, conflicts occur out of ethnicity. In fact, nationalism too is the result... (Assignment) Human Culture: ...
An analysis of an aspect of human culture from an anthropological viewpoint.
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Culture: An anthropological Perspective Ethni certainly has a very important role in the world politics today. According to many scholars, the terms; culture, ethnicity, and conflict are closely linked. Studies reveal that where there is a sense of culture, it is followed by conflict. In fact, as Eller points out, ethnicity can be termed as the product of tradition, value systems, and history, as well as of contemporary circumstances and interest in society (7-8). A close observation of history proves that ethnicity does not always lead to conflicts in society. However, when certain situations arise, conflicts occur out of ethnicity. In fact, nationalism too is the result... ? (Assignment) Human Culture: ...
1-The anthropological perspective regarding development and progress, and please refere to lectures "social daewinism" body ritual ammong the nacirema", first contact (film) and/ or Dancing SKELETONS. 2-Colonialism's effects on modern
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...Anthropological Perspective The Anthropological Perspective Regarding Development and Progress The relationship between developmentand anthropology has been fraught with difficulties since anthropologists advocated for applied involvement. Anthropologist’s notions about development are characterized by hostility towards people who advocate for development. Additionally, anthropologists are usually reluctant to participate in developmental agendas. They are reluctant to provide their professional services to development organizations and policy makers. Anthropologists attempt to combine their agency-level...
Explain the function of religion (e.g from a sociological, pychological and anthropological perspective). Can the relationship between religion and magic be seen as dangerous?
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...Cultural Religions Cross Cultural Religions Introduction The world “Religion” has been used by different contexts by people of different mind sets. However, generally religion is defined as a link of the human beings to spirituality by believing in something which he has not seen but yet has faith that it exists. The world has seen the rise and fall of many religions through time. Some religions developed and are now followed by a major population of the world while some are confined to a particular area. Religion is considered as a key stone in the formation and development of a culture and society. In fact, the division the world today into different countries, societies and cultures... of...
An Anthropological Perspective ofa Buddhist Ceremony
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...Anthropological Perspective of a Buddhist Ceremony An Anthropological Perspective of a Buddhist Ceremony IntroductionBuddhism is a religion that targets approximately over 300 million followers from all spheres of the world. Buddhism originates from the term “Budhi” which simply means “to awaken” (Buswell 2003). Buddhism has been in existence for many years now and approximately 2500 years ago, Siddhartha Gautama, referred to as Buddha, was on his own awakened (enlightened) at the age of 35 (Bechert, & Richard Gombrich 1984). Buddhism goes further than religion or ritual and is significantly related to a philosophy or a way of life. The reason why Buddhism is seen as a philosophy is due... An...
Edward EvansPritchard's contribution to anthropological theory
15 pages (3750 words) , Essay
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...anthropology. When we correlate the two it is quite apparent that this particular anthropologist's contribution to the field has been remarkably significant . from being a "field" worker for years among people and cultures alien to him to changing the entire perspective of anthropology as a subject, he has left a mark every where. His belief of being a part of a society to understand their root has become a concept modern anthropologist swears by. He possessed the intellect and the courage to put forward his contemporary views and challenge the foundation of pre existing norms that marked scholars of...
anthropological gender and sexuality and how cultural relativism
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...cultural relativism when addressing the case of Lia Lee in an American-based hospital (Faith 98). In an anthropological perspective, relativism regulates the people’s behaviors as well as how people perceive the world. Therefore, a people’s culture should be protected as it is the stronghold of their existence in the world. Fadiman’s works show the conflict between ethnocentrism, relativism and human rights. Ethnocentrism is portrayed when the medical community advocates medicine in order to heal Lia Lee while her parents advocates for animal sacrifices to heal their child (Faith 100). The doctors evaluate the Hmong culture based on their own... Anthropological Gender and Sexuality Gender as a Cultural...
What is Culture?
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...society. Example, the norm is not to burp loudly when you are eating, especially with a group of people. If you burp loudly, you commit a transgression and the people in the table will find you disrespectful or gross. The study of norms and transgressions is important for anthropological research because it helps understand the culture of a society based on the different behaviors of the members. Part 2. Question 1. We have a lot of experiences during our lifetime. The different milestones, such as birth, death and marriage, help us learn and understand our perspectives... ?Part Culture – In general, a culture is a set of shared values, goals and practices that characterizes an group or organization...
Muslim culture perspective
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...Culture Perspective Islam is more than a religion, as it is a lifestyle it is covered and guided by the four pillars of Islam which are, prayers(salat), witness(shahada), Alms(zakat), fasting (the sawm) and pilgrimage (hajj). They form the most important bit of the Islamic culture. Respect to humankind is what is encouraged by the culture as the word Islam means peace and submission in Arabic. Confessing there is only one lord and his holy messenger Muhammad is what shahad is about (Netlon, 2006). The world is a global village that one should accept and appreciate other cultures. Learning about what others perceived life is important as a common ground learnt through this, brings cohesion... ? Muslim...
Culture perspective of India
9 pages (2250 words) , Dissertation
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...culture, familial structure and roles, religions, type of society, trade, employment trends, holidays, foods and customs. Culture perspective of another country India India is next to China and is among the world’s most populated countries. Covering 2.4 per cent of the total world’s area, India cultivates a significant percentage of the total population of the world i.e. 15 per cent (IndiaMART, 2011). India is a very diverse country in all respects including the religion of people, their cultures, languages and traditions. People of India are diverse in their norms, values and traditions, many of which are influenced by Central Asia, Iranian Plateau, West... ? Culture...
any topic you think is good for my paper
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
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...anthropological perspective (New Haven: Yale University press, 1995). There are different ways in which individuals respond to sickness from one society to another. Hahn; therefore, concludes that anthropology is exclusively found on investigations of subjective States and expresses that sociocultural phenomena should be included in the medical epistemology and should be practiced4. This way the exclusion of patients’ emotional experiences, social circumstances and cultural influence are addressed. Hahn also uses the culture of contemporary medicine. He tries to see the difference between...
Theoretical Perspective
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...Perspective Na chnology has the promise of introducing fundamental change the way humans live. The implications of na chnology useare multifaceted and profound, for which reason research on the practical applications of this technology should properly look to a number of theoretical frameworks through which the issues should be viewed. Disruptive Technology Every once in a while, technological developments have such an impact on peoples’ lifestyles that they redefine society and its culture. Nanotechnology appears to be one such technological development (Lok, 2010; Lucas, 2012). Disruptive technology is a term that was first used by Clayton M. Christensen, a Harvard Business School... ?Theoretical...
HIV/Aids: A Medical Anthropological Approach
9 pages (2250 words) , Essay
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...Anthropological Approach Order No. 264000 No. of pages: 9 Premium 6530 Introduction The study of human health, in relation to environment and culture constitutes the field of medical anthropology. It covers populations as diverse as completely isolated communities, as well as bustling urban landscapes. The development in medical anthropology is mainly through a detailed research of the strategies employed by small, isolated groups to survive in their native environment, and this study aids in the design of strategies to help populations in more complex settings. (Elroy, Medical Anthropology in Ecological Perspective) AIDS has long been a stigmatized disease and although... the initial deathly...
A Critique of the Western Notions of "Progress" from an Anthropological Perspective
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...anthropological perspective. Straughn- Williams SSA 101.1869 ACritique of the Western notions of “progress” from an anthropological perspective. The Western idea of “progress” stems from the period known as “The Enlightenment” which was an age of exploration and discovery. We like to think of it as the time in which modern scientific principles were developed. The industrial revolution had seen a huge rise in the population of the world, with an increasing concentration in cities. Western nations had colonized vast areas of the globe and had begun to exploit their resources in a systematic fashion. Old subsistence level work... ? Trudyann Blackburn A Critique of the Western notions of “progress” from an...
Monique and the Mango Rains. Gendered Inequality from an Anthropological Perspective
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...anthropological perspective, using examples from Monique and the Mango Rains.By: Name: Course: Tutor: Institution: Date Introduction According to the history and beliefs of the human race, women are taken as of second importance from men. Men have always had more social and physical power accorded to them than their counterparts; women. Men and young boys are expected to uphold their society alongside making rules and laws, which govern all people living there. They hold public offices and the best or all job positions in the job market and simultaneously, control the women in all their activities. Women, however, are not allowed by law... Discuss gendered inequality (and social stratification) from an...
Medical Anthropology--u can choose one of 7 topics: 1 Shamanism, 2 Spirit Possession, 3 Culture-Bound syndromes 4 Medical Pluralism: 5 Critical Medical Anthropology 6 Biomedicine 7 AIDS in Southern Africa. each detials in the document.
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...anthropology Medical anthropology pertains to the biological and non-biological factors that lead to diseases, ailments and various conditions of the body and how societies respond to these (Baer et al., 2003). Medical anthropology holds that the body’ is shaped not only by physiological forces but also by culture and by man’s several states (Baer et al., 2003). In medical anthropology, health and wellness are cultural constructions whose meanings can vary across societies and historical epochs (Baer et al., 2003). From a medical anthropological perspective, a disease is not simply a result of a pathogen but the result of “social problems such as malnutrition, economic... On the relevance of medical...
visual culture and society.
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...Culture & Society In today’s world, visual perceptions have been used as a tool togenerate image and made-up impressions about products and people by different media systems. Herein, the point is whether the implementation of this tool has a negative impact on an individual and his behavior with other members of the society or not? A very good example can be taken from the collection exhibitions of famous fashion designers from UK including Nana Affau Antwi who make use of images, prints, designs etc. to portray the impression of their respective culture and ideologies. This makes it evident that visual perception, as a tool, plays a major role in human’s approach to life. As per my... Visual Culture...
popular culture in society
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...culture in society Popular culture refers to the perspectives, attitudes, images, ideas and memes which are accepted through informal consensus in a given culture’s mainstream society. It is profoundly influenced by the mass media. The ideas permeate day to today lives of the society. Popular culture has to evolve if it has to remain relevant and appealing. This is because too much monotony can cause people to lack interest. It must give people widespread access to it. Nothing can become popular unless people can access in a general and widespread way. This allows people to own the culture (Gans 1999, p197). Popular culture is necessary in the society (Gans 1999, p197). The importance... Popular...
Media Culture and Society
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...perspective on British society. Work consulted Aron, D and Livingston S 2011, “Eastenders,” Museum of Television Broadcasters. Barker, D 1985, “Mary Whitehouse complains to BBC over 'Eastenders' programme,” Guardian. Brooker, C 2011 “Complaining about the lack of realism in EastEnders is like moaning that Monster Munch crisps don't taste of monsters.” Guardian. BBC News 2003 “New generation of television detector vans hit the streets.” Scannell, P 1989 “Public Service Broadcasting,” Media Culture Society, Vol. 11 no. 2, 135-166... ? Word count: 1332 Media Culture and Society Public broadcasters have a unique responsibility to the public. They must provide...
Culture and Society Assignment
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...perspectives for males and female in a particular culture. Children can learn the gender roles through socialization with parents, teachers and friends in that they will observe what they mother and fathers does in the households tasks. Parents are socialized to believe that it is vital to have a son because they believe only male child would support his parents in the future. Meanwhile, in various cultures, boys are preferred to girls, especially when law, or economic conditions limit the number of children that parent should have in society. Children’s... Chapter3 and 4 Chapter 3: Culture & Society Many people use their cultures as the standard to observe and judge their behavior in their society, and ...
Anthropological Research
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...Anthropological Research The affinity group in this research will be Micronesians who spent a lot of time under American rule and have sub groups like Carolines, Marshalls and Marianas. The important aspect in the affinity group is that they have US colonial rule as common experience and have diverse evolutions for their other identities. The interest in studying the above-mentioned group is that they are affected by US rule and the sub groups have enough diversity. The obstacles regarding study of this group can be overcome by the lot of research and academic work available on the group. The ethical consideration in this paper is considering Micronesia as a culture and studying the group... Submitted:...
Media, Culture, and Society
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...culture forum’s discussions (Zizek 43). Summarizing the above discussion, mass media can persuade and insist the listeners or viewers. Mass media’s power makes its viable ideological apparatus. Mass media offers controversial topics to create a lively culture forum debate among the viewers and listeners. Evidently, mass media’s culture forum can significantly alter current society’s cultures or beliefs. Works Cited Curran, James. Media and Power. New York: Routledge Press, 2002. Edgerton, Gary. In the Eye of the Beholder: Critical Perspectives in Popular Film and Television. New York: Popular Press, 1997. Lull, James. Culture on Demand... ? Media, Culture, and Society October 12, Mass media can convince...
UAE Culture and Society
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...society, are being promoted in the new buildings. Date palms which are believed to be one of the symbols of unity of the nation are planted very frequently along the roads and pavements in order to preserve the desert topography in the urbanized UAE. Preserving the cultural heritage was not a priority during the early days of urbanization, however today as the governments seeks to promote tourism in the country, the cultural values are given prime importance in all the aspects of development of the cities, therefore... Contents Introduction……………………………………………………………………. .3 2. Demographics…………...……………………………………………………....4 3. Start of Urbanization………….…………………………………………………6 4. Emirati Food………………………………………………………………...
Haitian Culture and Society
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...cultural practices was introduced: the tradition of voodoo. This was a loosely defined set of religious and cultural beliefs based on the polytheistic societies... ?Haiti is often described as “rich in culture but deep in poverty”. Explain this paradox with illustrations of creativity in Haiti in the face of dire misery. Haiti is a small country surrounded by a number of other small nations in the Caribbean and located just off the South Eastern tip of the United States. Most people think of Haiti as a place plagued by poverty, unrest and natural disasters. The devastating earthquake of January 9th 2011 drew the world’s attention not just to the immediate damage and destruction caused by the earthquake...
Gaonic Society and Culture
22 pages (5500 words) , Research Paper
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...Society and Culture Introduction “Geonim” were spiritual scholars belonging to the Jewish community accepted all over the world in the “earlymedieval era”. The period of Geonim scholars covers a span of almost 450 years between 589 and 1038. These scholars taught “Talmud” and played a significant role in teaching and spreading “Torah” and “Jewish law”. Geonim were actually the head of the Babylonian and Talmudic institutions of Sura and Pumbedita in the Abbasid Caliphate (which is now known as Central Iraq). The first “Gaon of Sura” was Mar Rab who took the charge in 609 and the last was Samuel ben Hofni who died in 1034. The last “Gaon of Pumbedita” was Hezekiah Gaon who was agonized and he...
Symbols, Culture, and Society
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...societies, for the pressures to conform are irresistible. People tend to be conservative, and much importance is attached to observing customs in the ways of ancestors. Individual rights recede in to the background, and faith is used to suppress even relatively minor dissent. There are strong moral undertones to regimentation in such countries. It would be unfair to blame organized religion for putting culture in straight jackets. Totalitarian states have the same effect, and even put religion down with heavy hands in order to establish the unitary authority of governance and ideology. Petty dictators and monarchs... Religion has had a dominant role in the evolution of most cultures. Each modern...
Self, Culture and Society
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...society since the fact that workers do not need to switch or change tasks during... Division of labor and free markets Adam Smith argued that in free market, there are many sellers and buyers and there no one cares about their personal staffs. All they care in the free market is about the prices, sales, and the goods that have been sold. Moreover, the important things in the free market is the different types of free market philosophy which include the concept of unrestricted free market philosophy, and the competitive free market philosophy. The Philosophy of the unrestricted free market means that the market of the goods does not need permissions of importations from other parties even from the...
Media, culture and society
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...society always lurks on an organisation funded by the government. Further, BBC has also earned the reputation for 'cultural paternalism' and being 'popular with the upper-middle-class viewers'. This is also being attacked by the left-wing critics... How BBC attempt to maintain its independence from the UK government According to Wikipedia, "In the United Kingdom the term 'public service broadcasting' refers to broadcasting that is for the public benefit rather than for purely commercial concerns." The television and radio broadcasters also need to fulfill certain requirements, laid down by the communications regulator Ofcom, as part of their licence to broadcast. All the television and radio stations of...
Culture Comparison
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...cultures their diversity and their systems, we can widen our horizons and put some perspective on our own values; at the same time by helping to raise awareness of the numerous societies and their differing value systems we can help against... ? Cultural Anthropology Three principal outlooks have dominated American anthropology for the last hundred years: cross-cultural comparison of groups (focus on human groups), breadth (focus on a broad spectrum of space and time) and holistic systems (focus on the human experience in terms of holistic integrated systems) (Smith, 2010). The concept of culture is important and deep-seated in anthropology (Howe, 2004); cultural anthropology, one of four disciplines of...
culture studies
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...culture in their efforts to truly determine a plausible way of understanding and communicating with different ethnic groups and tribes. This is essential if we want to foster a more peaceful society around us for decades to come. Successfully communication is an intercultural environment requires an understanding of the culture, an in-depth knowledge of relationship building skills, and a desire to embrace people openly in today’s global society. Content Sir Edward Tylor was perhaps the first scholar to begin modern-day cross-cultural and anthropological studies. His first such attempt at this type of research was conducted back in 1889 and was an attempt... The Importance of Understanding Culture...
Collecting and Repatriation of Culture
4 pages (1000 words) , Admission/Application Essay
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...Anthropology.” Annual Review of Anthropology 32 (2003): pp 205-223. Print. In, James Riding. “Repatriation: A Pawnee’s Perspective.” American Indian Quarterly 20. 2 (1996): pp 238-250. Print. Jenkins, David. “Society for Comparative Studies in Society and History.” Comparative Studies in Society and History 36. 2 (1994): pp. 242-270. Print. Jones, Anna Laura. “Exploding Canons: The Anthropology of Museums.” Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 22 (1993): pp. 201-220. Print.... Collecting and Repatriation of Culture Collecting and repatriation of culture is a process of restoring of artifacts or cultural objects back to their native lands. Most artifacts ad works of art bear a cultural value to their...
compare and contrast at least two anthropological interpretations of the term "culture"
11 pages (2750 words) , Essay
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...Anthropological Interpretations of the Term "Culture" Introduction Culture, as anthropologists see it, gives meaning, logic, and importance to many discrete and seemingly unconnected facts about human life. Culture evolves, and cultural evolution, like biological evolution, is progressive. Hence, inferior forms regularly give way to superior forms. Just as humans are superior to nonhuman animals, so civilization is superior to barbaric and savage culture. Clifford Geertz (an American anthropologist) and Adam Kuper (a British anthropologist) propose unique interpretations of...
culture studies
6 pages (1500 words) , Research Paper
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...culture in their efforts to truly determine a plausible way of understanding and communicating with different ethnic groups and tribes. This is essential if we want to foster a more peaceful society around us for decades to come. Successfully communication is an intercultural environment requires an understanding of the culture, an in-depth knowledge of relationship building skills, and a desire to embrace people openly in today’s global society. Content Sir Edward Tylor was perhaps the first scholar to begin modern-day cross-cultural and anthropological studies. His first such attempt at this type of research was conducted back in 1889 and was an attempt at defining... ? The Importance of Understanding...
interpretation of culture
6 pages (1500 words) , Book Report/Review
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...perspective of defining [modern] culture. In it, there two cultures in which the world can group itself upon the execution of any particular cultural rule; that is losers and gainers. As is the case with the wider Marxist theory, there is the call for “selfishness” so that one gains from every act that they indulge in, irrespective of the effects that this may have on others, or cultures in this context (Williams, 32). In this case, the anthropological observation is that in the event that the two cultures interact, one is bound to gain more than the other. In support of the above, Walsh brings... Variations in Interpretation of Culture Introduction Anthropology and culture are two concepts that are...
Comparative Perspective on Organized Crime
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...Perspective on Organized Crime Organized crimes have secured one of the most stellar billings in the United s law enforcement history. The word Mafia, for instance, comes to mind whenever this subject is mentioned. Not a few literatures have already been written immortalizing their exploits. The novel which was later made into film The Godfather by Mario Puzo, is one of the most prolific of these, incorporating the Mafia in popular culture. This paper will particularly compare two Mafias that have come to haunt the criminal registries as early as the 19th century, namely: the Italian and the Russian Mafias. Our grounds for comparison will be in terms of organizational structure... ,...
religion in culture and society
9 pages (2250 words) , Essay
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...cultural relativism impacted on religion in the American society? Grade (June 2, 2015) Thesis: How have globalization and cultural relativism impacted on religion in the American society? Anthropology has studied humans and human behaviors for long. Through anthropological analysis, it has become possible to understand how humans have changed over time. One of the major areas of anthropological interest is the issue of human cultural and religious transformation. Intolerance for religious and cultural change was a major characteristic of the ancient human interactions. Notable historical human conflicts can be attributed to religious or cultural intolerance of one group... How have globalization and...
Concepts of Culture and Society
2 pages (500 words) , Research Paper
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...Culture and Society Before going into the discussion regarding concepts of culture and society, let us get a better understanding of what culture and society actually are. Culture is one of the most important elements of any society. It is a pattern of such characteristics and behaviors that a person exhibits living in a society. Culture marks our separation from animals (Muller, 2005, p. 15). Concepts of culture and society have a deep association. The existence of society and culture depend on each other in some ways. There can be no society without cultures and no culture can survive without presence of a social group observing the traditions of that culture. Elements of Culture... Concepts of...
Figurational and feminist perspective on alcohol culture
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...PERSPECTIVE ON ALCOHOL CULTURE Figurational and Feminist Perspective on Alcohol Culture [The primary author(s) of this paper] [The College which grants your degree] Figurational and Feminist Perspective on Alcohol Culture There are many reasons why sociologists turn to theories to help explain different aspects of a particular culture. Norbert Elias said "A theory gives a man at the foot of a mountain a bird's eye view of routes and relationships that he cannot see for himself." (1978, p. 160) With this analogy he attempts to explain that theories on social events can help a person to maybe better understand what is going on in context... with the rest of...
anthropological linguistics
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...anthropological linguistics. Without these building slabs humans, speaking any language of the world, would not be able to converse with each other. These are the core rules and units of speech which are all significant components to help convey our opinions, thoughts, ideas, feelings and personal experiences through language. Non Verbal Communication Non-verbal communication is used so often that we actually forget that we are using it. We do not realize how much we rely on non... ?Running Head: LINGUISTICS AND NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION Linguistics and Non-Verbal Communication [The [The of the Linguistics and Non-Verbal Communication Introduction Language is considered to be a foundation stone or...
Anthropological Theory
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...Anthropology: Anthropological History Affiliation The Danger of Mistaking Concepts for Actual Things The author, (Wolf, E. R., 1982), in his idea of connections critically examines that the world is a manifold that is made up of processes that are interconnected. He further asserts that these interconnections are subject of inquiries, which threaten to disassemble them, turn them to bits, and fail to turn them back to reality. The author asserts that terms such as “nation”, “society” and “culture” are name bits, which threaten to turn names into things. He further points that it’s only through an understanding of the...
Culture Studies
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...Culture Studies Culture Studies Identity The term identity refers to the beliefs, attitudes, traits and qualities that make an individual or a group different from other individuals or groups (Bennett, 2005). It is the collective aspect of various traits, which make an individual or a thing unique and recognizable. It basically refers to the personal and behavioral qualities that are unique to each individual. Identity is very important in understanding culture as different cultures help to shape people’s identity differently. Personal identity is therefore a crucial concept ion anthropological studies or any attempt to understand human nature. Identity can also refer to other qualities... is...
Gay Culture from a Sociological Perspective
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...culture from a sociological perspective: A lot of researchers have posed the theory that in actuality a lot of gays in the contemporary culture are posed as affluent middle class people. They usually have stable incomes, are in a committed relationship and can be seen raising a child together. This is due to the historic social forces that have helped in developing the gay movement largely belonged to middleclass. Also the economic patterns of living happily and freely as a gay person one is required to have a middleclass residency, employment and expenditure patterns. It is undoubtedly harder for people in minorities or belonging to a...
tourism, leisure, culture, society, polities
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...cultural versatility, and the environment on the whole. Tourists are recognized by their aptitude to consuming every now and then. Obviously, here lies a pit of fallacies regarding the notion of peaceful tourism. In fact, the risks for tourists while holidaying are likely to be shared and spread in their native communities or places of origin. Such a circulation of diseases, drugs, broken psyches, and amorality seems to let civilized societies down in their development. What is more, the readings by Dr. Andrews in combination with other materials provide one with a deeper understanding of an obscure side of tourism and travelling all around the globe. Tourists are more... Tourism is Only about the...
Popular Culture
13 pages (3250 words) , Essay
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...culture has been studied from several ideological perspectives on assumptions that they are 'not isolated and untouched by the surrounding culture' . This notion has lead researchers to assume that youth culture is not part of 'growing up', but a phenomenon that occurs as a precipitation of the social, political, cultural and ideological factors. There is not one monolithic youth culture that defines all young people. Popular youth culture embraces a diversity of sub-cultures or "tribes" such as skaters, druggies, snobs, band geeks, Satanists, Jesus freaks, techno-goths, computer dweebs, blacks, Latinos and white trash. Groups... Popular music, popular dance and the consumption of music/dance cultures I. ...
Industrial Society and Native Culture
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...SOCIETIES Brazilian Industrial society and the society of the Brazilian Amazonian Tribes Department, University, Correspondence address. INDUSTRIAL AND NATIVE SOCIETIES 2 Industrial and Native societies in Brazil The differences that exist between industrial and native societies that earn their livelihood primarily from primitive modes of life are immense. Surprisingly, there are similarities that have been emerging in many cultures, between the two as well, as a result of the need that industrial societies feel to return to more natural modes of life. There is, thus, a co-existence of these two modes of existence in the modern world, while there are several... ?RUNNING HEAD: INDUSTRIAL AND NATIVE...
Mass Media, Culture, and Society
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
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...Culture and Society Number] Mass media has traditionally been associated with the responsibility of imparting useful information to the wider masses. This role however has changed over the years. With the passage of time, popular culture has impacted the media. News channels are now focused on giving information, which will earn the channels and the programs higher TRP ratings as opposed to following the rules and regulations. Videos of terrorist attacks and bombings which have been aired on the national news channels are not only disturbing, but it is also against the rules of broadcasting. Similarly newspapers and tabloids print pages contain information about celebrities... programs which...
Culture and Society in Japan!
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 2 , Essay
...cultural perspectives, SUNY Press, India. Hativa, N 2000, Teaching for Effective Learning in Higher Education,Springer, Germany. Okimoto, D, & Rohlen, T1998, Inside the Japanese system: readings on contemporary society and political economy, Stanford University Press, USA. Shields, J 2004, Japanese Schooling: Patterns of Socialization, Equality, and Political Control, Tsuneyoshi, K, R 2001, The Japanese model of schooling: comparisons with the United States, Routledge, USA.... ?Japan’s educational system According to Ashton and Green (1996), the education system of Japan is known to be of high standards. The ministry of education, science, sports and culture that is referred to as Monbusho governs the...
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