Antibiotic resistance
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...Antibiotic Resistance of the Under the guidance of Outline: The focus of this research is prevention of antibiotic resistance. The paper begins with a thesis statement, followed by an introduction which discusses about the importance and need for prevention of antibiotic resistance. This is followed by review of literature and then a conclusion. Thesis statement How can health professionals prevent antibiotic-resistant infection? Introduction Antibiotic resistance may be defined as a type of drug resistance in which the organism survives exposure to the antibiotic that is administered targeting it. In other words, it is "resistance of a microorganism to an antimicrobial medicine... ? Prevention of...
Antibiotic Resistance
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...Antibiotic resistant genes Development of resistance to Antibiotic Mechanism of Antibiotic resistant Where do the antibiotic resistant genes come from? Role of mutations in Antibiotic resistant genes. Role of gene transfer in Antibiotic resistant genes Role of rDNA in Antibiotic resistant genes ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE GENES Antibiotics are special kind of chemotherapeutic agent usually obtained from living organisms. the word antibiotics can be referred to a metabolic product of one microorganism that in very a small amount is detrimental or inhibitory to other microorganisms.(Michael J Pelczar,5th edition, page 513... PAGE INDEX:- Introduction to...
ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE THREATS
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...antibiotic resistance Antibiotics are drugs which are used to fight out bacterial infections which help in alleviating the invading pathogen when taken appropriately. However, when these drugs are prescribed when they are actually not required they are not helpful in treating the disease and at the same time the patient is also exposed to the various side effects of the antibiotic. This gives rise to antibiotic resistance over time and the patients are at risk of developing resistant infections in future. These can cause serious illness or even death in the most resistant cases (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2013). Antibiotic resistance is a growing pandemic which has... Threats due to...
Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance
6 pages (1500 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...Antibiotic Resistance Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Development of antibiotics has opened a new era in disease treatment and understanding of the bacteria. During the next decade a host of prominent researchers systematically investigated the nature of bacteria and antibiotics, both its qualitative and its quantitative aspects. They found that antibiotics allow to neutralize or kill bacteria but 'learn' how to resist this impact. One important aspect of a scientific theory about a phenomenon is that it seeks to unravel and present in a clear way that phenomenon's causal properties and relations. "Virulence" and "pathogenicity" refer to the ability of bacteria to cause... Running Head Bacteria and...
Final Paper (Natural Selection and Antibiotic Resistance)
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...Antibiotic Resistance Experiment performed Due Introduction Evolution –a concept developedby Charles Darwin in 1859 in ‘On the Origin of Species’ publication, is that all life is believed to have progressed from one or a few common ancestors. Natural selection is the mechanism proposed for evolutionary change. In this process, organisms that have advantageous traits have an increased chance of surviving to produce offspring. The offspring will inherit the advantageous mutation and the next generation of organisms will have an improved chance of surviving to produce offspring. Mutation is the natural process of change of the nucleotide sequence of an organism’s DNA... Lab: Natural Selection and...
Thesis proposal about antibiotic resistance pathogens in fomities
8 pages (2000 words) , Download 1 , Dissertation
...antibiotics in treatment of bacterial infections has led to some organisms developing resistance to some antibiotic. Antibiotic resistance can be defined as a form of drug resistance in which the targeted microorganisms can resist exposure to the same drug (Hawkey, 3) Spontaneous genetic mutation in bacteria may confer resistance to microbial drug. Few pathogens exhibit resistance to antibiotics. Genes that confer resistance to drugs can however be transferred between microorganisms (Hawkey and Jones, 7). This transfer can occur through three different ways namely; transformation, transduction... or by conjugation. This transfer makes many bacteria to develop resistance....
Molecular Mechanism of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli
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...antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli Unit: Background: Resistance to antibiotics in E.coli and other bacteria is conferred to them by gene transfers and mutations. The main aims and outcomes of such are strains that are more virulent and tolerant to harsh conditions crated by antibiotic therapy. Results: Research into the molecular mechanisms highlights several mechanisms such as target modification, enzymatic breakdown and rapid efflux. The genes are obtained by horizontal transfer. They may be expressed together or as a single, with the effect of reducing the effect of the antibiotic on the cell. Conclusion: Sufficient research results have shown that the E.coli... ? Molecular Mechanism of...
I'm attaching a document. Read the background information about bacteria, antibiotics, and the evolution of antibiotic resistance at this site
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...resistance to simulated gastric fluid. Food Microbiol. 2006 Oct;23(7):694-700. 9. E. coli O157 infections in the UK. Euro Surveill. 2006 Jun 1;11(6)... Spoiled food and poor personal hygiene – these factors determine the majority of gastrointestinal infections. In the described case (see pdf file) wecan suppose intestinal infection. There is a difference between the microbial food poisoning and classic infection. Protamine poisoning depends on the presence of huge amount of bacteria in spoiled food whereas usual intestinal infection could be spread also through drinking water, dirty hands or table dishes. Actually infection can be disseminated if three conditions are available: source of infection (sick ...
Bacteria resistance to antibiotic
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...Resistance of Bacteria to Antibiotics Introduction Antibiotics fight against bacteria and microbes, which cause infectious diseases in humans. The invention of antimicrobial chemotherapy has prolonged human longevity. This discovery is a landmark event of the medical sciences in the Twentieth Century. However, over a period of time, these microbes and bacteria have become immune to antibiotic medicines, and this poses a serious threat to the public health (Todar). Antibiotics inhibit the growth of bacteria in humans, animals and plants. Bacteria and microbes cause infectious diseases, and antibiotics can be used against diseases caused by bacteria and viruses. For instance... of the of the of the The...
Antibiotic
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...Antibiotic Resistance in Livestock and Humans For many years, antibiotic drugs have helped turn previously life-threatening bacterial infections to treatable conditions. Further, antibiotics are used to improve livestock yields by preventing infections and stimulating growth in farm animals. However, the unnecessary administration of antibiotics in healthy farm animals and excessive application in fertilizers has led to high residual levels. The major concern is that antibiotic overuse in livestock presents increased risk for the emergence of resistant strains in livestock...
DB 3 - Biology
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...Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotic Resistance Part How Antibiotic Resistance Relate to Natural Selection Some bacteria are resistant to antibiotics. A good example is the Staphylococcus aureus resistance to antibiotic methicillin. Within a strain of bacteria, there are those that are weak and the antibiotic eliminates them with ease. Immunologically stronger bacteria survive the exposure to antibiotics and subsequently transfer the resistance traits to their off springs (Gibson and Gibson, 2009). Therefore, the generations of resistant bacteria continue though natural selection. Action of People that Lead to Antimicrobial Resistance One fundamental trend that promote antibiotic... DB 3 – Biology:...
Antibiotic Resistant Bactria
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...RESISTANCE TO ANTIBIOTICS Antibiotic resistance, according to Chadwick, , is a form of resistance to drugs by microorganism causing diseases such as bacteria and plasmodium. In this case, these microorganisms are able to survive even after they are exposed to one or more types of antibiotics. Majority of microbial are resistance to a particular type of antibiotics. However, there exist some bacteria that are resistance to numerous antibiotics. Collins (2002) describes them as MDR (multidrug resistant) or superbugs. Multiple researchers have categorized drug resistance as either induced genetic mutation or spontaneous. Through natural selection mechanism, the organisms that survive the killer... ...
How Antibotic Resistance occurs and Prevention of Resistance
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...Antibiotic Resistance occurs and Prevention of Resistance How Antibiotic Resistance occurs and Prevention of Resistance Antibiotics have been one of the best medical innovations of the twentieth century which have changed the face of medical practice. Bacterial agents are one of the most common pathological agents and the knowledge of bacterial diseases was identified towards the last few decades of the nineteenth century. This led to the search for medicines to treat these diseases and hence to the creation of antibiotics. Antibiotics are...
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria
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...Antibiotic-resistant bacteria Antibiotic resistance (ABR) is a kind of resistance to drugs (antibiotics) threatening the successful prevention as well as treatment of an ever-rising variety of infections whose cause is bacteria. The available data that supports the hypothesis that ABR is on the rise comes from WHO annual reports (more so for 2014) on worldwide supervision of ABR discloses that resistance of antibiotics is no longer a future prediction; its right here with us. In 2012 for instance, there were around 450,000 fresh cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB).Extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) has been discovered in over 92 countries (WHO, 2014). The problems that exist... Biology:...
Essay 3
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...ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE SUPERBUGS Antibiotic Resistance Superbugs Continued use of antibiotics results to resistance thereby making it impossible for antibiotics to have the required effects on bacteria. In some instances, bacteria may form great resistances such that there is a wide range of antibiotics that cannot have influence on them. This makes it extremely hard to get rid of such bacteria and they are commonly referred to as superbugs. Some of the commonly encountered superbugs include methicillin-resistant...
Antibiotics resistant superbugs
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...ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE SUPERBUGS Antibiotic Resistance Superbugs Continued use of antibiotics results to resistance thereby making it impossible for antibiotics to have the required effects on bacteria. In some instances, bacteria may form great resistances such that there is a wide range of antibiotics that cannot have influence on them. This makes it extremely hard to get rid of such bacteria and they are commonly referred to as superbugs. Some of the commonly encountered superbugs include methicillin-resistant...
The use of antibiotics and the concerns of creating strains of microbial resistant organisms.
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...Antibiotic Resistance School Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotics have been increasingly used in the last six decades for the treatment ofinfectious diseases caused by microbes and bacteria. One of the most obvious causes of the increase in the expectancy of average life over the years is the antimicrobial chemotherapy. Nevertheless, microbes which are resistant to the therapy of antibiotic drug and yet cause the disease expose the people to a lot of health problems. Diseases which can not often be treated by the antibiotics include but are not limited to gonorrhea, pneumonia, wound infections, septicemia and tuberculosis. This can partly be attributed to the fact that microbes and bacteria... ...
The advantages and disadvantages of using antibiotics
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...antibiotics were developed and put on the market. Examples include the glycopeptides (1958) and the quinolones (1962). Vancomycine is a well-known glycopeptide which is currently used as the last line of defence against the resistant staphylococcus, MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) (de kruijff et al, 2005). Advantages Antibiotics are one class of antimicrobials, a larger group which also includes anti-viral, anti-fungal, and anti-parasitic drugs. They are reasonably harmless to humans, and thus can be used to cure infections caused by bacteria. The term was coined by Selman Waksman, originally... Advantages and disadvantages of using antibiotics Antibiotics are...
Infectious Diseases in the News
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...Antibiotic resistance genes found in gut microbes of healthy kids,” the Washington University School of Medicine reports the presence of friendly microbes in the guts of healthy children, which have many resistance genes against antibiotics. Such genes elicit concern because harmful microbes may use them as an advantage to interfere with the working of antibiotics, which may lead to critical illnesses and,eventually, death. This is a report of the contents of the article and analysis of its relevance to MBI 111 Course. Gautam, a professor in immunology and pathology, asserts that young children below the age of five years consumemore antibiotics... Infectious Diseases in the News In the news article...
Evolution
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...antibiotic resistance will be addressed and its links to differences in bacterial genomes. Table of Contents Evolution 4 Introduction 4 Discussion 4 The Aspect of Evolutionary Theory 4 Studies of this Aspect in Real Time 5 Use of Microorganisms with a Rapid Generation Time 6 The Concept of Antibiotic Resistance 7 The Link of Antibiotic Resistance to Differences in Bacterial Genomes 7 Conclusion... Running Head: EVOLUTION Evolution of the of the Executive Summary The evolutionary theory was published by Charles Darwin. Evolution is the binding force of all biological research. Since its inspection, evolutionary theory has been popular among ordinary audience and scientists. Since improved function is...
Long-Term Effects of the Over-Use of Antibiotics on Pathogen Resistance
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...Antibiotics Assess the Long-Term Effects of the Over-Use of Antibiotics on Pathogen Resistance The 20th century can be described as a period of greatest discoveries. One of those discoveries has been on antibiotics. These drugs have been used to control disease-causing organism. The antibiotics are typically used to contain bacteria infection in human beings and other domestic animals (Engelkirk et al., 2011). However, some of infections caused by the bacteria have been able to evade the use of antibiotics in both human and animals. This has been a key area of concern in the 21st century....
Antibiotics
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...Antibiotic resistance: the case of MRSA. The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is commonly found on human skin and in the nasal passages where it can exist for years without causing any problems at all. If, however, the bacterium reaches internal areas through a breach, or if the immune system is for any reason impaired, the bacterium can cause very serious infections to the deeper tissues, and to the heart, which can be fatal if not treated. In 1941, the antibiotic agent Penicillin G was found to be effective against almost all strains of Staphylococcus aureus but by 1944 the bacterium had begun to develop resistance to the penicillin, and nowadays more than 95% of the strains are resistant... ...
THE EVOLUTION OF DRUG RESISTANCE IN VIRUSES AND BACTERIA
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...Resistance and Reasons for Occurrence A succinct analysis of Bryskier (2005), reveals that antibiotics are composed of natural secretions by fungi and bacteria that aim at engulfing and killing other bacteria... The Evolution of Drug Resistance in Viruses and Bacteria Nam The Evolution of Drug Resistance in Viruses and Bacteria Introduction Therise in the frequency of drug resistance in viruses and bacteria in the contemporary medicine world is notable in a wide range of drugs used to treat different varieties of diseases. Such resistance may also result from the evolution of new genes in viruses and bacteria where such genes have drug-resistant qualities. Drug resistance is a designed feature involving ...
Plasmid analysis
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...antibiotic discs were placed in the four quadrants. Figure1: Antibiotic profile against tetracycline in E. coli DH5alphaE:: pMTL84445 After inoculation at 37 degree Celsius for overnight, it was observed that the antibiotic disc of tetracycline had a clear zone. This indicates that the E.coli culture is resistant to kanamycin, chloramphenicol and ampicillin. There is very little sensitive to tetracycline. Figure 2: Antibiotic resistance profiling: Table 1a : Antibiotic resistance profiling of kanamycin control Kanamycin control E. coli DS941::pRRK Antibiotic disc Zone diameter in mm Chloramphenicol 30 Kanamycin 0 Tetracyline 10 Ampicillin 0 E.coli DS941::pRRK bacteria... ?Plasmid Analysis Plasmid DNA is...
When the antibiotics quit working.
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...ANTIBIOTICS QUIT WORKING When Antibiotics Quit Working al Affiliation WHEN ANTIBIOTICS QUIT WORKING Abstract The antibiotic resistance and factors provoking this phenomena were studied in the context of the given visual research task. In the course of time, the population (but not a single individual) can acquire resistance to some chemicals, such as antibiotics and pesticides. The emergence of drug resistance within the populations of organisms is a logical consequence of the theory of evolution. Thus, antibiotic is a substance of microbial, animal or plant origin, which can suppress the growth of microorganisms, or cause their death. Antibiotics are prescribed to prevent... ?Running head: WHEN...
When the Antibiotics Quit Working.
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...antibiotic resistant bacteria. The reason behind this is that when the bacteria come under attack by these drugs, they have the capability to undergo certain changes via many mechanisms which make them resistant to that particular drug. After the development of one strain of resistant bacteria, there is a quick spread and if the same bacterium infects another person, it will still be resistant to the antibiotics. This can be very harmful and it is via this mechanism that the antibiotic... When the Antibiotics Quit Working With the advance in technology, the field of medical sciences and health has also made great leaps and moved ahead. The world has moved a step further and it has made human beings...
Assigment annotated bibliography
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...antibiotic resistance’. The writers assert that improved approaches need to be developed for new antibacterials to overcome the issue of rapid antibiotic resistance. For this purpose, the researchers examine the development of improved new antibacterial drugs that do not either kill bacteria or hinder their growth but fight disease through targeting bacterial virulence. This research work gives readers a clear view of why existing approaches or techniques are not capable of addressing the issue of rapid antibiotic resistance in antibacterials. The study leaves further scope for experiments... Annotated Bibliography Botello-Morte L., Bes, M. T., Heras, B., Fernández-Otal, Á., Peleato, M. L & Fillat, M.F....
Evidence Based Practice and Applied Nursing Research Phase 3IP
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...antibiotic resistance. Scand J Urol , 12 (1), 34-38. Retrieved flrom: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/21681805.2013.834512 Mufti, U. B... References Chenoweth, C. & Saint, S. . Preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infections in the intensive care unit. Critical Care Clinics , 29 (1), 19-32. Retrieved from: http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/23182525/reload=0;jsessionid=6OYLMc6pH2uDYz0xvqEH.0 Medina-Polo, J.; Jiménez-Alcaide, E.; García-González, L.; Guerrero-Ramos, F.; Pérez-Cadavid, S.; Arrébola-Pajares, A.; Sopeña-Sutil, R.;, Benítez-Salas, R.; Díaz-González, R. & Tejido-Sánchez, A. (2013). Healthcare-associated infections in a department of urology: Incidence and patterns of antib...
Bacterial cells Quantification
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...antibiotics on bacterial cells. This is always an important test because of the current crisis in clinical practice due to the increasing amount of bacteria that are highly resistant to many or all of the available antibiotics (Neu, 1992). This can be done in several ways, but antibiotic disc sensitivity testing is particularly useful as it allows a test of several antibiotics on one sample of organism, allowing us to be certain that all the microbes are the same and thus reducing... ?The Effect of Lysozyme Solution on Micrococcus lysodeikticus Cell Counts Introduction Bacterial cell quantification is useful in many areas of biology, in that it allows us to know the number of cells, or the viable cell...
The Molecular Mechanism That Make Staphylococcus Aureus Resistant To Antibiotics
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...Resistant To Antibiotics ID Introduction, An antibiotic is asubstance that kills bacteria by disrupting a critical function, usually coded by a definite protein in the bacteria. Once this critical function is affected the bacteria cannot carry out its normal functional roles, and it is eliminated from the ecosystem. Antibiotics bind to proteins making them lose theirs capacity to carry out normal functions. Proteins normally replicate DNA, resulting in cell walls for bacteria or proteins for definite purposes. According to Talaro (2006), these processes are extremely vital in the functioning of bacteria. On the other hand, if bacteria develop... ? The Molecular Mechanism That Make Staphylococcus Aureus...
Describe with NAMED examples, the potential risks and benefits involved in the use of genetic manipulation of plants to improve yields of species of agronomic
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...Antibiotic Resistance. Plants become resistant... Potential Risk and Benefits of Genetically Modified Plants Today, various scientist of different fields worried as world’s statistics showed that our population will be doubled twenty years from now particularly in third world countries. Scientist gathered in various symposiums, conferences and consultations trying to address the issue that agricultural production should be doubled to prevent hunger and poverty of human race in the future. We all noticed that our current production is decreasing due to limited area for production and the degradation of soil fertility. Now a day, scientist is trying to resolve this problem by modifying plants altering it...
Research Paper
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...antibiotic research, controls how healthcare workers prescribe antibiotics, bans the use of antibiotics for non-related applications in the agricultural sector, and prohibits the sale of over-the-counter antibiotics. My research questions are: How did superbugs develop? What are the current effects of superbugs on society? What can stakeholders do to prevent the development of superbugs and to resolve the national and global health issue of drug resistance? The starting points of my research are the essays from McArdle, the Scientific American, and Sharma, wherein McArdle... 19 July Superbugs: How They Became Super and What Super Responses Look Like After Megan McArdle narrated the life and death of...
Genetically Modified Plants
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...Antibiotic Resistance. Plants become resistant... Potential Risk and Benefits of Genetically Modified Plants Today, various scientist of different fields worried as world's statistics showed that our population will be doubled twenty years from now particularly in third world countries. Scientist gathered in various symposiums, conferences and consultations trying to address the issue that agricultural production should be doubled to prevent hunger and poverty of human race in the future. We all noticed that our current production is decreasing due to limited area for production and the degradation of soil fertility. Now a day, scientist is trying to resolve this problem by modifying plants altering it...
Are Kids overmedicated?
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...Antibiotic over or misuse may arise especially in situations where diagnosis is very uncertain e.g. in infections of the ears. Sometimes they are prescribed for conditions that are simply not caused by bacteria yet the drugs will specifically target bacteria. This could lead to the elimination of stomach bacteria with adverse effects such as antibiotic resistance... Running Head: Overmedication in Kids. A point of debate has emerged lately over the health and medication of our children. It is emerging with a lot of concern that kids are receiving lots of medication some of which are not called for and may have adverse effects on the health of children. Studies are increasingly suggesting overmedication...
Micro (attached file)
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...resistant to antimicrobial agents. The frequency of its occurrence has become a source of concern to most clinicians and epidemiologists all over the world. The propensity of these pathogens to develop resistance to the current antimicrobial drugs has made things challenging for most clinicians (Gardner et al, p415). The first antibiotic discovered was penicillin by Alexander Fleming and he had warned us against the irrational use of antibiotics stating “The time may come when penicillin can be bought by anyone in the shops. Then there is the danger that the ignorant man may... Hospital acquired infections which are now popularly called as nosocomial infections are most often caused by organisms...
GMO's and their negative effects
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...Antibiotic resistance to some drugs. In the past, health professionals have become alerted to the increasing number of bacterial strains that are showing immunity to antibiotics. These bacteria develop resistance to antibiotics by creating antibiotic resistance genes through natural mutation. Biotechnologists use antibiotic resistance genes as selectable markers when inserting new genes into plants. In the early stages of the process, scientists do not know if the target plant will incorporate the new gene into its genome. By attaching the...
Multidrug Resistance in Mycobacterium Tuberculosis
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...resistance to either isoniazid and rifampin may be managed with other first-line drugs, MDR-TB demands treatment with second-line drugs that have limited sterilizing capacity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and these drugs are less effective and more toxic. This has particularly created a situation of pandemic of antibiotic resistance that threatens the globe (Pablos-Mendez, A., Lazlo, A., and Bustreo, F., 1997). Mechanism: To solve the problem and to find out an effective solution against this problem, it is important to know the mechanism of development of resistance. The mycobacterial cell wall is surrounded by a...
Antibiotic sensitivity
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...Antibiotic sensitivity testing Insert of Sensitivity tests are normally used to tests the level of resistance a bacteria has developed for a given antibiotic/ chemical treatment. This aspect is mainly used in epidemiological researches. This paper illustrates a report on the test for sensitivity/ susceptibility of various bacteria to various antibiotics test. This is done using the Kirby and Bauer method. The paper is divided into three sections. Section one is an introduction to the process of bacterial sensitivity to various antibiotics and various methods used in testing for sensitivity. Section two...
UAB researchers: Inappropriate antibotics use in ERs still a problem
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...Antibiotics Use in ERS Still a Problem Summary/Analysis The newspaper article by Yann Ranaivo establishes that ineffective use of antibiotics to treat viral infections is still prevalent in emergency departments despite the increased concerns about antibiotic resistant conditions by hospitals nationwide (Ranaivo, 2014). Indeed, the article quotes the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from 2001 to 2010, which reveals that infections including the viral infections are still prone to prescribed antibiotics (Ranaivo, 2014). However, the article reveals that UAB noted that antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infection as acute respiratory... UAB Researchers: Inappropriate...
WEEK 8 journal 6500
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...antibiotics, and an issue came up with a patient regarding allergic reactions and resistance to antibiotics that I felt needed to be addressed. As I was going through the charts to find the right order for an antibiotic, specifically rocephin, one patient with active MRSA bacteria in his urine appeared not to respond to the treatment. After the patient was prescribed with a different antibiotic, which he responded to, which lead to the conclusion of MRSA bacteria being resistant to rocephin. Taking into account that MRSA bacteria is the key cause for “difficult-to-treat infections in humans” (CDC, 2010) and the patient’s... NURS 6500 and NURS 6510 Practicum Experience Journal You must submit a journal...
The Discovery of the Theory of Natural Selection by Darwin
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...resistant to antibiotics. Discussion Evolutionary theories were first seen with the Greek philosophers who adhered to the ideas of origination, setting forth that all things originate from water or air, and that all matters come from one central and guiding... ?Natural Selection (school) The Discovery of the Theory of Natural Selection by Darwin Introduction Since the dawn of civilization, man has tried to explain his existence and the development of all living things. Various theories have been established by scholars and philosophers and these theories have established various explanations and schools of thought on the existence of man and of the universe. No theory has been as revolutionary or as...
Evidence Based Nursing. Watchful Waiting.
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...antibiotics for AOM cases. Block, S. L. (1997). Causative Pathogens, Antibiotic Resistance and Therapeutic Considerations in Acute Otitis Media. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 16, 449–456. This article can be classified as a filtered as well as summary of evidence which came about through a symposium that discussed the challenges of antibiotic resistance... ? Evidence Based Nursing American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Family Physicians. (2004 Clinicalpractice guideline: Diagnosis and management of acute otitis media. This is a filtered source besides being an evidence based guideline. It has literature touching on AOM (Acute otitis media) that is based on evidence summary. As...
Nursing Research Criteria Qualitative Study
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...antibiotic resistance. All these effect complicate the expenditure for the patient and the government. Coming up with the method of increasing on the adherence to the hand hygiene of the staff is simple but the problem... NURSING RESEARCH CRITERIA Affiliation Problem ment Hospitals across the country have been suffering a wide range of problems related to poor hand hygiene. In this article authors assert that despite several research showing the significance of hand hygiene in controlling the nosocomial diseases in hospital there has been low response in embracing the idea. Furthermore, it has been identified that the cost of health care increases by two fold because of poor hand hygiene. The purpose of...
Biology of food
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...antibiotics. There are antibiotic resistant bacteria as the effect on the rumen led... ?Yiting Liu Oct 26 Biology of food Speaking of tough-and-stringy beef, If a cow (or a person) eats more calories than they use, what happens to the "excess?" If a person eats more calories than they use, the excess calories are stored in the body as fat. The unique high fructose corn syrup sauce contains a high amount of fructose (sugar) which is excess calories needed in the body. Digestion, absorption, and metabolism of fructose favor the production of fat in the liver. Fructose does not stimulate insulin secretion nor does it promote leptin production. Insulin and leptin regulate food intake and body weight, thus...
MRSA Infection
8 pages (2000 words) , Download 1 , Research Paper
...resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infection, originally considered a hospital acquired infection, was earlier confined to hospitals but is now emerging in communities as well (Weigelt 5; USAToday.com). The reason for MRSA being a high risk and high alert pathogen is that this strain of S. aureus is resistant to antibiotics, especially beta-lactam antibiotics such as oxacillin, amoxicillin, penicillin and methicillin. MRSA is responsible for causing severe problems such as pneumonia, bloodstream infections and surgical site infections in healthcare settings such as dialysis centers, nursing... 12 September MRSA Infection – Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention Introduction MRSA (methicillin-resist...
Hw2
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...resistance to antibiotics making the use of such drugs ineffective. Antibiotics resistance is a situation whereby an antimicrobial drug ceases to have effect in stopping or killing such microorganisms. Refereeing to antimicrobial, they are substance, both natural and synthetic as well as disinfectants that have the ability to kill or hindering the reproduction of microorganisms. Before the antibiotic drugs were discovered in the 1940s, there were many deaths arising from sexually transmitted diseases and infections such as tuberculosis. The new drugs enabled the fighting of the diseases possible, however, over time; some of the germs have developed... Bacteria The significant difference in structure...
The Evolution Explosion: How Humans Cause Rapid Evolutionary Change
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...resistance to the most new drugs in just a few months. Ecological scars of human technology have being made known, insecticides application and the broad evolution consequences of antibiotics and antiviral use have being largely unexplored. According to Human Palumbi, humans have great impact on the evolution, which remains largely accidental, but man’s actions have generated a burst of evolutionary change that adversely affects the entire natural word. Palumbi claims that there is little doubt that man’s activities are altering the evolutionary processes in which we all depend on. This changes threaten our economic wellbeing and also... ? Evolution expression: How human being cause rapid evolutionary...
Clinical practice guideline: Diagnosis and management of acute otitis media.
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...antibiotic resistance and therapeutic considerations in acute otitis media’, and ‘Treatment of acute otitis media in an era of increasing microbial resistance’, both published in Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal are unfiltered. The article ‘Diagnosis and Management of Acute Otitis Media’ published in the American Academy of Pediatrics And American Academy of Family Physicians and the article Diagnosis and Management of Acute Otitis Media, published in Pediatrics is filtered. Lastly the ‘parents’ interview’ is a primary source. A2. Appropriate for this nursing practice situation The article ‘Diagnosis and Management... ?Acute Otitis Media A. Review the sources of evidence listed above and do the...
Micro (attached file)
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...resistant bacterial strains the usefulness of penicillins have been limited in the recent years. Methicillin is a narrow spectrum β lactam antibiotic which was developed in 1959 by Beechman in order to treat penicillin resistant Gram positive organisms like Staphylococcus aureus. In the 1960s and 1970s it proved so efficient against Staphylococcus aureus that it was extensively used and even sprayed in the wards of hospitals to control Staphylococcal infection in new born.( Elek SD, Fleming PC. A new technique for the control of hospital cross infection. Lancet 1960;ii:569–72). Methicillin resistant... Antibiotics are antimicrobial medications that kills or slows down the growth of micro-organisms. The ...
Rapid Colony Transformation of E -Coli with Plasmid DNA
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...antibiotic resistant phenotype. The transformation method can be categorized into four: 1.Pre-incubation stage: In this the cells are immersed in a cat ions solution and incubated at 0CThis immersion is supposed to help the negatively charged phosphates of lipids in the E-Coli membrane. The low temperature gels the cell membrane, thereby stabilizing the distribution of charged phosphates and allowing them a more effective shield from the cat ions. 2. Incubation: The DNA is added and the cell suspension... E-Coli transformed by plasmid DNA using a rapid method Purpose: This is to demonstrate that e-coli in combination with a foreign gene-in this case-plasmid DNA- shows the ability to multiply into an...
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