The Apostle Paul
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...Apostle Paul The life of the Apostle Paul is a fascinating addition to the New Testament. A man who had nothing to do with the life of Christ, nor had any relevance to the centrally important story of the resurrection, has had his writings included in a book that has the strongest influence in the world for a literary work on the structure of the Christian religion. According to Polhill, there is no way in which to write a biography of Paul as there are no references to his early life. The historical resources that are available about his life start with his persecution of Christians (1). The story of his life is built upon traditions and through scraps of writing that tell the story... Profile of the...
The apostle Paul
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...apostle Paul is arguably the most important figure in Christian history besides Jesus himself (Miller, par His ministry was the defining factor leading to the spread of early Christianity. He was responsible for writing a large portion of the books comprising the New Testament. Paul's interpretation of the Crucifixion and preoccupation with the divinity of Christ, born out in his sacrifice and resurrection, helped set the tone for the tenants of Christianity. To Paul, Christ's life and teachings were secondary to the seminal event of his capital punishment and subsequent escape from the throes of death. Ironically, Paul did not consider himself to be Christian, nor a father of a new... Introduction The...
Passion of Apostle Paul
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...Apostle Paul Outline Desiring the consolation of the love of Christ, unity with him and fellowship with the spirit. (Philippians 2 4). Requirements: a. Being likeminded, having the same love and being one in spirit (Philippians 2:2). b. Should act not out of pride, selfish ambition or vain conceit. (Philippians 2:3). c. Each member to consider others better than themselves (Philippians 2:3). d. Each member should not focus on themselves but act for the benefit of others (Philippians 2:4) 2. Believers should have the mind of Christ (Philippians 2:5-8). He: a. did not pride over his equality with God (Philippians 2:6). b. humbled himself and took the nature of a servant (Philippians 2:7). c... ?Passion of...
The Apostle Paul and his Pastoral Epistles
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...Apostle Paul and his Pastoral Epistles I hold the view that Paul wrote what are known as the Pastoral letters that includethe epistles of 1st and 2nd Timothy and Titus. Though there have been arguments to the contrary, Paul identifies himself as the writer in the salutations, calling Timothy to whom he denotes he is writing to in the 1st and 2nd epistles, ‘my own son in the faith’ and, ‘my dearly beloved son’ (1st Tim1: 1-2 and 2nd Tim1:1-2) and writes in Titus 1:4 that the epistle is to ‘Titus mine own son in the common faith’. Titus and Timothy were two of some of the men and women that God used to make the Ministry of Paul successful and fruitful, both of who were pastors. Though Titus... The Apostle ...
The Apostle Paul and his Pastoral Epistles
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
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...Apostle Paul and his Pastoral Epistles I hold the view that Paul wrote what are known as the Pastoral letters that includethe epistles of 1st and 2nd Timothy and Titus. Though there have been arguments to the contrary, Paul identifies himself as the writer in the salutations, calling Timothy to whom he denotes he is writing to in the 1st and 2nd epistles, ‘my own son in the faith’ and, ‘my dearly beloved son’ (1st Tim1: 1-2 and 2nd Tim1:1-2) and writes in Titus 1:4 that the epistle is to ‘Titus mine own son in the common faith’. Titus and Timothy were two of some of the men and women that God used to make the Ministry of Paul successful and fruitful, both of who were pastors. Though Titus... The...
Apostle Paul and the Law
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...Paul and the Law: Focus on Galatians and Romans Table of Contents Introduction 3 Social Differentiation, ‘Otherness’ and the Discussion of Law 3 “Works of Law” 6 Galatians 8 Curse 8 Ritual 10 Romans 11 Food 12 Love 13 Some Thoughts on Modern Life and the Example of Christ 14 Conclusion 15 Bibliography 16 Paul and the Law: Focus on Galatians and Romans Introduction Mosaic Law has been an issue of contention between scholars in relationship to its role in Christian life. Some speak of Mosaic Law as irrelevant to Christian life, while others speak of the difference between moral law and ritualistic law and how it relates to Christian living. In letters...
You belong to a house church of ancient Rome in the late 50s. You have receievd a letter from the Apostle Paul, whom you have never met but who intends to visit you, asking for your support in his next mission, to spain.you may choose a particular house
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...Apostle Paul has written a letter to the Romans concerning an upcoming visit. He has touched on this theme as a central reason for his visit. Various theological sources will be cited throughout the paper as faith is both defined and related to Paul’s impending visit. Wills (2006) points out that faith meant something different then from what it means today. Ehrman (2005) is concerned with the separation of Christians and Jews on the grounds... THE ROLE OF FAITH IN THE FIRST CENTURY IN THE JUSTIFICATION OF ALL PEOPLES BEFORE GOD By and School Date Abstract This paper examines the role of faith in the First Century of the Christian Era in the justification of all peoples before God. The Apo...
The Missionary Journeys of Paul the Apostle
5 pages (1250 words) , Download 1 , Term Paper
...Paul the Apostle Table of Contents Introduction 3 Paul’s Missionary Methods and Strategies 4 Paul’s Missionary Journeys 5First Journey (48-49 AD) 5 Third Journey (53-57 AD) 6 Historical Social and Religious Context of Paul’s Missionary Journey 7 Conclusion 8 Bibliography 9 10 Introduction Apostle Paul was born in ca. 5 AD in Tarsus of Cilicia in an Israelite family of Jewish ancestry. He was circumcised on the eighth day of his birth in compliance with the Hebrew law. After being selected as one of the apostles of Jesus, Paul made strong contributions to the significant growth and development of early churches, which were based on the preaching of Christ Himself. His... ?The Missionary Journeys of Paul...
Book Report on Picirillis book, Paul the Apostle
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...Paul the apostle 1 Paul was born in Tarsus the main of cicilia. This where the apostlePaul was born was an important city in the days of Paul. It was one of the biggest trading centers on the coast pf the Mediterranean Sea. The city was one of the main seaports. 1.2 Roman citizenship- Apostle Paul was a roman citizen living in a wealthy family that was prominent in Tarsus. In those times, the roman citizenship was given for the wealthy individuals were not guaranteed. 1.3 Tarsus was made a self-governing city by Rome but not every citizen was granted roman citizenship. If an individual...
Paul the Apostle
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...Paul was a product of Jewish Diaspora in Asia Minor and was not a native Palestine (Hooker 1996). Because of this diaspora, Paul gained a Roman citizenship (Murphy-O'Connor 1997). There is ambiguity in what is known about Paul, yet from Phillipians 3:5 it is known that Paul belonged to the tribe of Benjamin from where he was circumcised, then given the name Saul (Prat 1911). It is known based on the writings in the Acts of the Apostles that Paul was a fierce persecutor of the Jews because the claim that Jesus' followers make that the cricified one was God's Messiah, was in every way contradictory to the law that Paul held so dear (Matera 2006... Introduction Born in Tarsus, the capital of Cilicia,...
Religious Revolution: How Paul the Apostle gave distinction to Christianity within the foundations of Judaism
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...Paul the Apostle Gave Distinction to Christianity within the Foundations of Judaism The issue on the relationship between the foundation of Judaism and the teaching of the Paul the Apostle has continued to raise endless and controversial debates among religious thinkers and other legal professionals. In his teaching, Paul the Apostle attempted to offer detailed and expansive distinction of Christianity within the foundation of Judaism. The proponent of his argument claims that Paul the Apostle had a clear knowledge and understanding on Christianity teachings and Judaism religious beliefs and teachings. On their side, the opponents of Paul the Apostle distinction between... ? Religious Revolution: How...
The Apostle Pauls Contributions to Christianity
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...Apostle Paul's Contributions to Christianity Introduction There is no figure, other than Jesus Christ, that is more popular in the history of Christianity than the Apostle Paul. This could be a controversial point among Christian believers but the New Testament part of the Bible is the living witness to this claim. Others claimed that based on the four Gospels St. Peter was the first person who was tasked to lead the church established by Jesus Christ and was the key person in the establishment of Christianity and Paul was not even among the 12 disciples. Whoever among them was the first head of the church is not the concern here. Our focus is on the contribution of St. Paul being an apostle...
Paul
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...APOSTLE PAUL 4 Discussion question Paul’s religious experience on the road to Damascus According to Brown, Saint Paulviewed that the followers of Jesus Christ were portraying a lifestyle and believe that was contrary to the beliefs of the Pharisees to which he was ascribing to. Paul’s sudden encounter with the Lord Jesus is an indication that all was not finished at the cross and he admits that he had been personally sent to minister to the gentiles and to bring them to the knowledge of God (Brown, 427). Apostle Paul received a great revelation from Jesus Christ. His transformation was...
How did Paul universalize Christ?
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...Paul believed that the calling to serve God came much earlier while he was in his mother’s womb. He believed that this revelation was given to him to continue to work of the prophets who spread the message of the lord in nations across the world. He believed that he was also an apostle who was directly chosen by Christ to preach the message of the lord. Thus following his divine encounter with Christ Paul set out on this missionary task. He was chosen to be a missionary for all people including non-Jews and others living in nations around the world (Edart). Paul began his missionary work by addressing the Jews and later decided to spread the Gospel to non-Jews living around the world... Saint Paul is a ...
Was Paul the founder of christianity?
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...Paul the Founder of Christianity? Insert (s) Was Paul the Founder of Christianity? Apostle Paul is widely regarded as one of the greatest and most important figures in the history of Christianity. Originally known as Saul of Tarsus, Saul famously converted to Christianity on his way to Damascus and later changed his name to Paul. Although the debate as to whether Paul or Jesus was the true founder of the religion of Christianity has remained contentious to date, experts concur that Paul’s contributions were significant in the early growth and spread of Christianity from a little known sect of Judaism to a worldwide religion that is open to all. Paul is not only known as a prominent Apostle... Was Paul...
Apostle Pauls view of the Law
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...Paul or better known as St. Paul or Apostle Paul was born in Tarsus (an ancient located in the south-central part of modern day Turkey) and was a Roman citizen by birth. His family members were Hellenistic Jews and thus, he was, as he himself claims “I am a Jew, a Tarsian, a citizen of no ordinary city” (Acts 21:39). As Ramsay and Wilson tells us, “to Hebrews he emphasizes his Jewish character, and his birth in Tarsus is added as an accident: but to Claudius Lysias, a Greek Roman, he emphasizes Tarsian citizenship (after having told of his Roman citizenship)” 1. His Hebrew name was Saul and while still a Pharisee he persecuted the Christians. He was a person of prominence in the holy city... ....
The Corinthian Community and Paul
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...Paul: Women and men’s head-covering and uncovering in prophesy Cor. 11:2-16) Apostle Paul has just given an explanation in the third verse that Christ is the head of every man. It is therefore true that the obvious implication in the fourth verse is that each man who prophesizes or prays with his while his head is covered does not honor the Lord, which is his spiritual head. The rationale is given in the seventh verse, whereby we are told that the glory of God should never be covered at the time of public worship. When a man covers his head during public worship, it would signify the abandonment of his place of authority that he has been given by God and, so, debase... The Corinthian community and Paul: ...
New Testament Books summaries
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...Paul’s conversion and escape from Damascus, Peter’s escape from prison, role of the Holy Spirit, the miracles disciples performed and the missionary journey of Paul. The apostles (Peter and Paul) and the Holy Spirit are the focal personalities portrayed in the book. The Corinthians It falls under the genre of Pauline epistles. The main themes are Christian living, doctrine of Mosaic laws, Faith in Jesus and leadership of the church. Events in the book major upon the advices that Apostle Paul gave to the church and society of the Corinthians on matters concerning promiscuity, hypocrisy and committing to God’s work. The Corinthians had... New Testament Book Summary New Testament Book Summary The New...
Paul and Palestinian Judaism by E.P. Sanders
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...Paul and Palestinian Judaism: A Comparison of Patterns of Religion by E. P. Sanders Introduction E. P. Sanders is a Religious Studiesprofessor at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. He has written several books on Christianity and Judaism, with particular interest in the thought of Apostle Paul and its relationship to Judaism. Besides Paul and Palestinian Judaism, these include: Paul, the Law, and the Jewish People, Paul: A Very Short Introduction, Paul: A Brief Insight, Jewish Law from Jesus to the Mishnah: Five Studies, The Tendencies of the Synoptic Tradition, etc. The critics consider Paul and Palestinian Judaism a controversial and encyclopedic work, which represents... ? A Book Review Paul...
History of Christianity
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...Apostle Paul carried God’s message to Rome and followed the growth of Christianity in Middle East before religious wars began. Another interesting part in this film concerns the identity of Jesus Christ. There were questions as to whether Jesus was God or a human being. If indeed Jesus was God, it is hard to understand how a supreme being like God could create a man to live among other human beings and still be God. Work Cited A History of Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years. Perf. MacCulloch, Diarmaid. B and B Media Group, 2010. DVD.... History of Christianity After viewing the film, “history of Christianity: The first three thousand years”, it is possible to know and trace the origin of...
PAUL: A JOURNEY WITH CHRIST
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...Paul i.e. the persecutor and the apostle. Paul was a Roman Citizen The book of Acts describes the citizenship of Paul as Roman. Some scholars have argued that Paul probably inherited Roman citizenship from his ancestors2. Jewish were taken captive during upheavals that brought Pompey to Syria. In that upheaval, many Jewish became captives, this explain why Jews were living in Diaspora. Paul acquired the Greek medium education, which was significant in his life as an apostle. The book of acts proves the citizenship of Paul when Paul seeks a fair hearing of his case before Caesar. Roman citizens had the privilege to appeal against a ruling. Paul lived in Tarsus Historical account... Lesson I Paul:...
Paul the Apostle's view of the Law/Torah in Galatians
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...Paul the Apostle's Views of the Law/Torah in Galatians Introduction Christian and the law is one of the most debated issues in evangelism. Pauline epistles, which focus on the issue of law forms the bases used in understanding Christian law. Most theologians argue that Apostle Paul was the emancipator from the law of God. The issue of law is highly discussed in Pauline epistles. Galatians, which is one of Apostle Paul’s epistles, centers on Paul’s views about the law or Torah. However, Galatians is inconsistent with other epistles and portrays Paul as an observer of the Law of Christ but a disregarder of Moses’ law. Understanding Paul’s... ?Table of Contents Table of Contents Introduction 2 Conclusion 9...
EXEGETICAL PAPER FOR THE APOLSTLE PAUL
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...Paul uses the analogy of ingrafted branches. Paul confirms the restoration of the Jews from this portion of Scripture (Murray). That is, through their fall, the Jews shall get restoration. Through their fall and suffering, the Jews will come to appreciate and acknowledge the saving grace that is in Jesus Christ. The third theme is on jealousy pride and unbelief. Apostle Paul writes from the 22nd verse up to the 32nd verse on this subject. Paul reckons... Introduction Paul’s letter to the Romans represents one of the most profound yet simply d books in the Bible. The eleventh chapter of Romans stands out as a bit controversial to most readers. Essentially, this is due to a series of interpretations of...
1 Thessalonians 5
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...apostle Paul around 51 A.D. The theme of the book 1 Thessalonians is to encourage the Thessalonians to stay on the right track and to encourage them to live a spiritual life. Book 1 Thessalonians relates to modern day life in so many ways. This is true for 1 Thessalonians as it is many other areas located in the bible. In the beginning of the book the Thessalonians are thankful for the word of God. This is important since the word of God has dramatically changed the Thessalonians life. This directly relates to modern day life in a sense that it is important to continue to thank God for his word... The Book of Thessalonians can be found in the New Testament of the bible. The book was written by the...
Leadership
1 pages (250 words) , Download 1 , Case Study
...Apostle Paul during his time as a leader. Additionally, the article outlines six leadership perspectives incorporated in transformative leadership used to formulate twelve propositions that create a link between Peter’s leadership and modern leadership (Caldwell, McConkie, & Licona, 2014). Critical Analysis Historical leadership possesses... LEADERSHIP Leadership Summary The article generally discusses leadership and tries to establish a link between transformative leadership and today’s leadership. In this context, transformative leadership is concerned with the leader’s role to ethically maintain covenantal duties to those they represent. This transformative leadership borrows from the role played by...
Philemon
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...Paul Just as Betz (2004) observes, Apostle Paul writes with a lighthearted tone, but tactfully and with clever wordplay (1:11), to win Philemon’s willingness. Paul organizes the appeal as was prescribed by ancient Romans and Greeks by: building a common ground (1:4-21); persuading the mind (1:11-19); and appealing to emotions (1:20-21). It is interesting that Onesimus’ name is not mentioned until rapport is built between Paul and Philemon (1:10). The appeal is also made at the end (1:17... Philemon Number Introduction Fully known as The Epistle of Paul to Philemon, Philemon is one of St. Paul’s prison letters, since verses 1, 9 and 19 make this plain. The letter is specifically addressed to Philemon...
Rerum Novarum, especially its treatment of Socialism and Capitalism
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...apostle Paul, who championed the essence of the work. To this end, socialism does not give much prominence as it is done for capitalism. Work Cited Novarum, Rerum. Encyclical of Pope Leo XIII on Capital and Labor. The Role of the Church. Pdf.... Treatment of Socialism and Capitalism The church has different ways through which it views the two ideologies of socialism andcapitalism. Capitalism has tendencies of exploiting individuals and determining the wages people are entitled to their duties. In the excerpt, the church talks about non-exploitation of individuals and acquiring property through dubious means. Essentially, the extreme tendencies of capitalism are refuted and moderate standards elevated...
SIM #11
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...Paul elaborates on the life of a believer and the various tribulations that Christians face. The apostle Paul tells the believers to rejoice despite the tribulations and advises on the essence of prayer. Additionally, Paul underscores the importance of living a life that is guided by the spirit. He notes that spiritual well-being brings a connection to the divine. Paul also integrates the importance of the gift of prophecy among the believers. Ideally, leaders and the followers should have a relationship that is based on mutual respect and understanding everyones needs. Bibliography Gene Green. The...
Paul of tarsus life, career, writings, and teaching
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...Paul of Tarsus Life, Career, Writings, and Teaching Introduction Paul was an apostle to Jesus as is revealed by numerous epistles written by him in the New Testament. He was named Saul until his conversion from when his name changed into Paul. In this work, I will analyze the life of Paul in terms of his engagements before his transformation, how he came to be changed and his work in pioneering the work of preaching the gospel to foreigner. I will describe the way Paul as an apostle used his Roman citizenship to effectively propagate the gospel, Paul’s position about the Jewish religion and the Law of Moses. This work will also touch on the methodology of preaching... ?Insert Insert Grade Insert Paul of...
Paul and the Law- Paul's view on the Law
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...Paul the Apostle. The Law As a Right Paul had always been a zealous Jew who, according to the Bible, became a persecutor of the early Christians. In fact, before he was converted to Christianity, he stood approving the demise of Stephen who was stoned to death by people, believing that he was teaching things contrary to Jewish laws (Archeological Study Bible, Acts 7.60). When Paul was arrested after his conversion, he presented himself before Agrippa... ?Full A Biblical View of the Law from Paul’s Perspective Introduction Religion and government so often come in conflict with each other. Power, perhaps, is the most influential factor causing this conflict. Sometimes, it is so disappointing to see...
Two of the Gospels, compared and contrasted
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...Apostle Paul. Christianity in the early days got... Task: Religion and Theology Using the book (IVP) and biblical text itself choose two of the Gospels, compare, and contrast their presentation of the life of Christ. Be sure to include how things like the authors’ background and audience affect their message. The gospel according to Mathew begins with the genealogy of Jesus. It traces His roots of to King David through Joseph, His father. Jesus had a miraculous conception through the Holy Spirit as Mary conceived before meeting with Joseph. A star guided visitors from the east to visit Him at Bethlehem. Later on when he was two years old, he escaped with his parents to Egypt when King Herod began...
What I learned from "On Judaism" by Martin Buber
3 pages (750 words) , Book Report/Review
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...Apostle Paul. He attempts to analyze Jesus situated between Apostle Paul and his Jewishness. He presents Jesus as a member of classic Judaism. He addresses Judaism as a phenomenon of religious reality, and that it has become manifested through Judaism. So the Judaism exists for the sake of this reality. He argues that by the term ‘God’ he means not a moral ideal, social image nor a projection of a psychic nor anything created... submitted Book Report, Review, Religion and Theology by Martin Buber Martin Buber’s work can only be understood if and only ifyou take his faith as a Jew, as well as a philosopher of dialogue. His analysis on religion and theology focuses mainly on two figures, Jesus and Apostle ...
Religion and Theology by Martin Buber.
4 pages (1000 words) , Book Report/Review
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...Apostle Paul. He attempts to analyze Jesus situated between Apostle Paul and his Jewishness. He presents Jesus as a member of classic Judaism. He addresses Judaism as a phenomenon of religious reality, and that it has become manifested through Judaism. So the Judaism exists for the sake of this reality. He argues that by the term ‘God’ he means not a moral ideal, social image nor a projection of a psychic nor anything created... ? submitted Book Report, Review, Religion and Theology by Martin Buber Martin Buber’s work can only be understood if and only if you take his faith as a Jew, as well as a philosopher of dialogue. His analysis on religion and theology focuses mainly on two figures, Jesus and...
Faith
7 pages (1750 words) , Essay
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...Apostle Paul has written a letter to the Romans concerning an upcoming visit. He has touched on this theme as a central reason for his visit. Various theological sources will be cited throughout the paper as faith is both defined and related to Paul’s impending visit. Wills (2006) points out that faith meant something different then from what it means today. Ehrman (2005) is concerned with the separation of Christians and Jews on the grounds of faith... as salvation and more important than law. Ludemann (2002) attempts to achieve a synthesis with Christ as the common meeting ground for the two religions. Grant (1976) notes that Paul’s labours were devoted to the equation of...
Interpretation of Martin Luther King's Letter from Jail
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...Apostle Paul, Jesus Christ and Abraham Lincoln (549). In this particular aspect... ?Sur Lecturer A letter from Birmingham jail Introduction Martin Luther King’s "A letter from Birmingham jail" was a response to the statement published by fellow eight clergymen from Alabama who criticized Martin Luther for participation and organization of the protest against Birmingham segregation. Martin Luther King’s letter was actually an effort to criticize the church and the white moderators, and to defend himself from such accusations. With this regard, this paper seeks to analyze the way King uses various appeals in his letter: appeals to reason (logos), appeals to emotion (pathos), and appeals based on his...
God the Communicator
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...apostle Paul as cited in the article is a wonderful example of a Christian communicating to God and for God. There is a need for every Christian to understand that he is a communicator, tasked to share the gospel to other people (Fjeldstad, 2010). As God is a Communicator in action, so must Christians convey God’s message, not merely through speaking the good news to others, but to be testimonies of Him, keeping in mind what Kraft states... The Communicating God We can see throughout the Bible that God has been communicating to His people, revealing Himself through signs in the Old Testament, and putting on the human form through incarnation in the New Testament. Through God’s incarnation becoming Jesus...
A Critical Analysis of N.T. Wright New Perspective of Paul on Covenantal Justification
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...Paul on Covenantal Justification A Critical Analysisof N.T. Wright New Perspective of Paul on Covenantal Justification Introduction Each generation produces a number of gifted scholars, a number of which gain a significant amount of popularity and impact significantly on Biblical studies. Nicholas Wright is among these men having garnered a significant amount of acclaim and acceptance for the work that he has done in New Testament theology and most especially for the work that he has done with regard to Apostle Paul. His influence, not only in Pauline but also on Biblical studies as a whole and stretches across denominational divides impacting... A Critical Analysis of N.T. Wright New Perspective of...
Summarize the teaching and work on application from the "Bible, book 1 Timothy (only chapter 1)"
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...Apostle Paul to Timothy, whom he describes as his “true child in the faith.” (1 Tim 1:2) Paul left Timothy at Ephesus to teach sound doctrine to the church he had planted there, while he went on to Macedonia. (1 Tim 1:3) In this, the first of two letters to Timothy, Paul provides instruction to Timothy in order that he may “fight the good fight, keeping faith and a good conscience.” (1 Tim 1:19) Chapter 1 begins with Paul identifying himself and stating his authority: “Paul, an apostleI of Christ Jesus according to the commandment of God.” (1 Tim 1:1) This epistle... 22 March, Chapter of 1st Timothy The Book of 1st Timothy is the first of what are known as the “Pastoral Epistles,” written by the Apostle ...
Can Secular Leadership Be Useful in the Church?
30 pages (7500 words) , Thesis
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...apostle Paul, as evidenced in the pages of the New Testament, the Gospels, the Book of Acts and the Epistles, as well... This document considers the of leadership, both Christian and secular, and asks if the church can learn and benefit from secular ideas about leadership. It asks what are the qualities required of a leader and comes to the conclusion that many of these are linked directly to the functions of a leader. It considers the historical picture of leadership within the church and how church leadership has changed over time. It then asks if the present pattern of church leadership needs to change and if so why and how. Differences between the two styles of leadership, secular and Christian are...
Self-Portraits. Journal. The Renaissance artists Titian, Rembrandt, and Durer have each painted
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...Apostle Paul. Paul was a relentless advocate of faith and was the first to offer proof that it is God’s grace that will save a penitent sinner if he is of true faith (Westermann, 2004, 314). After completing Self-Portrait as the Apostle Paul (1661), I find that I can identify strongly with Paul’s humble melancholic attitude. It is this expression, along with the resignation that typically befalls those entering old age that I wanted to convey most. I... Running Head: Excerpt from Rembrandt’s Journal Excerpt from Rembrandt’s Journal 11 May, Runninghead: Excerpt from Rembrandt’s Journal 2 I, Rembrant Harmensz Leydensis, have decided to embark on an artistic journey. For years, I have toiled away in my...
What is the argument of the Letter to the Romans ? How far does the situation of Paul and/or the Roman church shed light on its interpretation?
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...Apostle Paul who composed The Epistle to the Romans, with the main intention of explaining the essence of salvation [that it is offered by God through Jesus Christ, by grace]. The writer is identified as Paul in 1:1 and the early church is bereft of any voice that gainsaid Paul’s authorship. There are also several historical references that are consistent with known facts about Apostle Paul’s life. Most scholarly circles have always pointed at The Epistle to the Romans as St. Paul’s and the Bible’s most important... theological legacy. Although it cannot be expressly stated when and where the Epistle to the Romans was written, yet many scholars are convinced that the book must have been...
Christian World Veiw
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...apostle Paul, contains many theological truths that contain a considerable degree of importance to a Christian Worldview. It talks about the Creation of Life, Sin, and Salvation, among other things. On Creation The Book of Romans begins with Paul claiming that the creation of the world allowed us to see the divine power of God, which have been invisible u until that point (Romans 1:20). This shows us that creation was something performed by God, all of his creations should manifest all of His desires as well. Moreover, as we humans are God’s creation, we should likewise aspire for whatever God aspires. On Sin According... The Book of Romans and a Christian Worldview The Book of Romans, ed by the...
Research paper explaining how the provided questions have and/or helped one gain benefit from the study of scripture from the bo
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...apostle Paul is writing to provide guidance to Timothy in his role as a leader of the Church at Ephesus. This book is the first of what are known as the Pastoral Epistles, providing instruction and exhortation. Chapter 1 contains a short coverage of the Christian faith, but is worthy of study in and of itself. The example of all Christians is Christ, for as Paul writes: Christ’s “perfect patience, as an example for those who would believe in Him for eternal life” is to be emulated by all who serve Him. (1Tim 1:16) This has application in our everyday lives, an exhortation that we are to be patient with those who are in sin, loving... Meditations on Chapter of Timothy In this letter to Timothy, the...
Reading critique
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...Apostle Paul in the Bible. This is sufficient counselling, to help man undergo full therapy and recover from his problems (Hawkins, n.p.). According to "trying and training for change” by Ronald Hawkins, the biblical model trains for patience and for Godliness, but not for trying, because trying means that an individual have some hope that they can get some spiritual strength to behave differently, without the conviction that the counselling will get them better (Hawkins, n.p.). Hawkins interprets the Biblical system to mean his version of the “training for model,” which focuses on training individuals based on the contents... ? Crabb and Hawkins Critique Malisa Anderson Liberty Reading critique Summary...
Rhetorical Appeals
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...Apostle Paul left his village of Tarsus and carried the gospel of Jesus Christ to the far corners of the Greco Roman world, so am I compelled to carry the gospel of freedom beyond my own home town. Like Paul, I must constantly respond to the Macedonian call for aid.” “We have waited for more than 340 years for our constitutional and God given rights” Logos: This refers to the use of logical reasoning in support of the arguments made by the writer. The following is an example of the same: “"...even though Negroes constitute a majority of the population, not a single Negro is registered. Can any law enacted under such circumstances... Rhetorical Appeals Introduction The art of rhetoric persuasive writing...
Hum sammary 2
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...Apostle Paul. However, she argues that even if virginity is important, there must be existing people who are procreating so that virgins can be created. Thus, she says that virginity should be left to the perfect so that the rest could use their gifts in the best way they could. Undoubtedly, her gift is her sexual power and she uses... Summary: Prologue to The Wife of Bath’s Tale The Prologue to The Wife of Bath’s Tale begins by the speaker claiming that she is an ity on marriage because of her extensive personal experience. To illustrate, she had her first marriage when she was only twelve years old and she has had five husbands to date. She mentions that many people have criticized her for her many...
Miracles of Jeaus in the book of Luke
4 pages (1000 words) , Research Paper
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...Apostle Paul and has also authored the book of Acts of the Apostles (which is the fifth book in the New Testament). Luke was a doctor and most likely very well educated going by his writing style and the structure of the book of Luke. It’s worth noting that the book of Luke... ? Miracles of Jesus in the book of Luke Introduction There is no dispute as to whether Luke the of the book of Luke, a synoptic gospel account. The general view of scholars is that this book was written between 59 A.D. and 70 A.D. He is viewed as a unique writer because he was a gentile. The gospel according to Luke is one of the four gospels in the bible. It is the third book in the New Testament. Luke was an associate to Apostle...
Summary of the books of the Bible Part II (New Testament Books). (Matthew to Revelation)
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...Paul talks about people and what it is that they did, or shouldn’t have done. Paul understood so well the things we do are separate from who we are. First Corinthians First Corinthians covers a variety of subjects, but most of them are centered on motives and the behaviors of believers. This letter was written by the apostle Paul and addressed to the Christians in Corinth, a wealthy city on the Mediterranean Sea, where people from various cultures and religions often converged. Their diverse backgrounds and religious experiences often caused problems in the church and created a need for Paul to write his letter. First Corinthians... Matthew The book of Matthew begins the New Testament and is the first...
The Baptism Debate
9 pages (2250 words) , Research Paper
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...Apostle Paul argues... ? The Baptism Debate Religion and Theology of Supervisor] Introduction Religion, as an aspect of life, entails a set of beliefs about existence, nature, and purpose of the universe.1 Religion is also defined as a personal belief and/or opinions towards existence of nature and worship of a particular deity.2 In addition, religion includes divine involvement of supernatural beings in human life and the entire universe. Several religions exist depending on how an individual is swayed by different religious principles. Common religions include Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jewish religion.3 Differences between these religions exist in various religious aspects. One such...
Faith, religion and theology
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...Apostle Paul meets the Romans and the Galatians for the first time. In Romans chapter five to chapter eight, He preaches that man can enjoy the divine grace through propitiation (Hill,Knitter, & Madges 1997).. In Galatians, Paul refutes the earlier teachings of James that taught that one had to master and practice the Jewish law as a prerequisite of being a follower of Christ. In these two contexts, Paul’s letters teach that the only way that man can have a divine relationship with God is through Jesus Christ. Therefore, according to Paul, the remedy of man’s sin is through repentance. Augustine’s confession precipitates from the fact... Religion and Theology Religion and theology In the two scriptures,...
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