Aristotle and poetics
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...poetics Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, which was first performed in 429 BC, is regarded bymany scholars as a classic tragedy. The play makes use of a lot of images that bear different meanings. An image can be defined as a verbal picture that is used to represent tangible objects in real life. In plays and poetry, imagers can have very straightforward meanings or the meaning may be a lot of meanings based on various perspectives. The image of sight and blindness is one of the biggest pictures used in the play by Sophocles. The image of sight and blindness has both a straightforward meaning in the play while also having hidden meanings that the author tried to pass across... Oedipus the King and poetics...
Poetics
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Poetics, Aristotle speaks of Tragedy as a form of imitation that is produced by a combination of rhythm, tune and meter. It is an imitation not only of a complete action but of events inspiring fear or pity. 'Tragedy is an imitation, not of men, but of an action and of life, and life consists in action, and its end is a mode of action, not a quality.' Using Aristotle's logic, it then follows that the study of tragedy can be a medium through which people's lives may improve. While he stresses the importance of action in tragedy, he claims that it is the plot which is the most important thing in the genre. One of the implications... Mimesis or imitation is viewed as a representation of nature. In Poetics, ...
Read the following excerpt from Aristotle's Poetics and discuss the respects in which the Medea adheres to his guidelines and
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle’s Poetics and Medea by Euripides Introduction In his time Aristotle was the first toformulate the foundations for further critical investigation of drama nature. He is the author of the theory of tragedy, where he carefully defined and described the elements of a play which, from his point of view, were the most crucial for it to be classified as tragedy. Different tragedies created by many different authors are usually considered through the prism of Aritotle’s theory of tragedy. A splendid example of the tragedy according to Aristotle is Medea created by Euripides. The given paper will prove that the in The Third Episode of Medea we can see all three elements of classic tragedy... ? 30 April...
Euripides and Aristotle discussion about a tragedy hero
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle. Poetics. Web. 15 November, 2011 ... ?Euripides and Aristotle discussion about a tragedy hero Introduction A perfect tragedy hero was determined by Aristotle and in the works of ancient philosophers and writers Aristotle’s claim can be discussed further on. On the example of Euripides “Medea” the basic determinants of the tragedy hero is correlated with the main character of the epic poem, Medea. Euripides’ “Medea” found new interpretations created by Heiner Muller, Franz Grillparzer and other authors. Actually, scientists consider Euripides’ plays to be too unusual for the conservative Athenian society (Dykstal 104). In his famous play “Medea” the Euripides presented a completely new perspective on tragedy. This perspective is worth... ?Euripides...
Aristotle's Poetics vs. The Lottery and The Bourne Identity
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle’s Poetics vs. The Lottery & The Bourne Identity In Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery,” the structure and the arrangement of the incidents arevery important because they are what drive the plot forward. On an initial reading of the story, the reader is drawn in because they are wondering what is going to happen next. Additionally, the reader is intrigued because they want to know what is behind the odd behavior of the townspeople. The incidents in this story are structured in such a way that they slowly reveal odd behaviors that could lead the reader to anticipate the reason for the behavior and the actions of the characters. For example, at the...
Aristotle Research Paper
7 pages (1750 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle’s achievements are not confined to science and political science; rather, he has also articulated comprehensive and analytical approach while examining the literary activities prevailing in his society. His magnificent Poetics (350 BC) defines different literary genres, by establishing the criteria about superior and inferior types of literary pieces. There are, Aristotle argues, two main varieties of poetry i.e. the Fine, and the Mean (Aristotle, 31). He has categorized epic and tragic poetry in the fine variety, while the satire... Module Module ID: Aristotle Aristotle undoubtedly serves as one of the greatest and most influential personalities the world has ever produced. By dint of his...
Aristotle
2 pages (500 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...Aristotle's Poetics, the character projected by a speaker, artist, etc. Thus in Aristotle's logic, the process of establishing a general proposition by induction (seeing the univers.il in the particular) or deductive reasoning in which a conclusion is derived from two premises is syllogism or Epagoge. In traditional logic, a syllogism is an inference in which one proposition (the conclusion) follows of necessity from two others (known as premises). In his Posterior Analytics, Aristotle sets out what seems to be a rather stringent method of acquiring scientific knowledge and understanding (episteme). Aristotle argues that genuine... Epagoge is Greek for argument from induction. .... By extension, in...
Aristotle
5 pages (1250 words) , Term Paper
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle in Poetics through the argument that poetry is capable of conveying the knowledge of universals to people (45). Thus, as McKeon purports, there arise two classes of thought; one that believes in the aesthetic value of art, and one that believes in the cognitive value of art. Aristotle comes up with three types of knowledge; theoretical, practical, and productive. The theoretical knowledge refers to the knowledge about things that are fundamental in nature. An example of this knowledge is the products and processes of nature. Practical knowledge refers to the knowledge that teaches what to do to address certain contingencies. Thirdly, productive... ? Aristotle Aristotle, the great philosopher...
Aristotle
3 pages (750 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...Aristotle’s restored works to try to reconcile the church dogma with philosophy to end the rivalry between logic and faith. Aristotle was the bridge to achieve this peace. His logic in deconstructing an argument still is a standard and elementary concepts presented in any philosophy class. In the Poetics for example, Aristotle reasons the basic units of society and how they evolve into a state. He relates how man is a political being and gives advice about how humans need to live in a political state. These musings form some of the basis for western thought and politics that Americans use. The Founding Fathers used works... month year Aristotle According to the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (IEP), ...
Integrated Research Paper
6 pages (1500 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle was convinced that imitation is natural to humanity and is one of mankind's advantages over animals (Aristotle, Tara?n & Gutas, 2012). While it is known that Aristotle's Poetics were in the form of two books, one of these books is on comedy and the other on tragedy. Only the part that focuses on tragedy is still surviving. Aristotle taught that tragedy has six elements: character, plot-structure, thought, style, lyric poetry, and spectacle. The characteristics in a tragedy are just a means of steering the story, and the plot, but not the characters... ? Works by Aristotle Works by Aristotle Aristotle was a Greek philosopher who was born in 384 BCE at a place known as Stagirus. He joined Plato’s ...
2 Page Essay
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle’s “Poetics”, tragedy is “an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude….in the form of action, not of narrative; with incidents arousing pity and fear, wherewith to accomplish its katharsis of such emotions” (Aristotle 23). Apart from the structural components, or the literary form of a tragedy, the thematic portion of Aristotle’s concept pivots on the magnanimity of the social status of the hero, in most cases, the character’s hubris or overweening pride and ambition, whose downfall is essentially the result of a tragic flaw (hamartia), embedded... Definitions of Tragedy: A Critical Analysis of “Oedipus the King” and “Death of a Salesman” As outlined in...
Aristotle's Poetics Paper
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Poetics” Poetics is a systematic and comprehensive piece of literary work in which Aristotle approaches poetry in a scientific way. Aristotle’s method and manner of presenting his work bestows it with universal value. Aristotle not only defines poetry but also answers to the charges brought against poetry by Plato in his ‘Republics’. Aristotle defines poetry as an ‘imitation’ and illustrates that there are different kinds of poetry which include Tragedy, Comedy, Epic poetry, Ditherambic poetry, lyre playing and flute playing. In ‘Poetics’ Aristotle refuses Plato’s concept of imitation and presents his concept of imitation which carries refined meanings and a great scope. According to Plato... ?“From...
Definitions of Tragedy: A Critical Analysis of Oedipus the King and Death of a Salesman
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle’s “Poetics”, tragedy is “an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude….in the form of action, not of narrative; with incidents arousing pity and fear, wherewith to accomplish its katharsis of such emotions” (Aristotle 23). Apart from the structural components, or the literary form of a tragedy, the thematic portion of Aristotle’s concept pivots on the magnanimity of the social status of the hero, in most cases, the character’s hubris or overweening pride and ambition, whose downfall is essentially the result of a tragic flaw (hamartia), embedded... Definitions of Tragedy: A Critical Analysis of “Oedipus the King” and “Death of a Salesman” As outlined in...
Aristotle
10 pages (2500 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle was a polymath without a shadow of a doubt. He was a great philosopher; he was also a theologian, in addition to this he was also a literary critic. “Poetics” written by Aristotle define several important literary elements and it also serves as a benchmark for all the other literary critics during the time of Aristotle. His definition of a tragedy was widely accepted by writers and they tried to match his description, Aristotle wrote in his poetics that the tragic hero must feel excessive pain and he must undergo excessive suffering, he also wrote that not everyone can be a tragic hero. A person of great... ?Client’s Here: 27 December Polymath refers to a person who is a man of many talents;...
Philosophy
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle's Theory of Tragedy As outlined in Aristotle’s “Poetics”, tragedy is “an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; in language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament, the several kinds being found in separate parts of the play; in the form of action, not of narrative; with incidents arousing pity and fear, wherewith to accomplish its katharsis of such emotions. . . . Every Tragedy, therefore, must have six parts, which parts determine its quality—namely, Plot, Characters, Diction, Thought, Spectacle, Melody.” (Aristotle 23). Apart from the structural components, or the literary form of a tragedy, the thematic portion of Aristotle’s... A Critique of...
Drama Essay
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle’s idea of a hero within a story. The main character of the story plays the role according to the provided guidelines and greatly contributes to the achievement of a successful tragedy according to Aristotle’s standards. A tragic hero is a good person whose decisions spell out their doom. It is however important to note that a tragic hero must not necessarily die but their actions must indeed lead to a dramatic and sympathy wielding end to the story. References Aristotle. (350 B.C.). Poetica XIII. Translated by Butcher, S. H. Retrieved from http://classics.mit.edu/Aristotle/poetics.2.2.html Bloom, H. (1988... Aristotle’s Idea of a Tragic Hero Aristotle’s Idea of a Tragic Hero Introduction...
Reaserch Paper on Othello the Moor of Venice, as a tragedy
6 pages (1500 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle’s Poetics a pamphlet of about fifty pages, incomplete, ill preserved and unsystematic, has proved a book of perennial interest for students of literature. It deals mainly with tragedy and here too with Greek tragedy which alone was known to him. He wrote at a time when there was no literary criticism to go by except Plato’s attacks, not on tragedy as such but on poetry in general. Again and again people refer back to Aristotle, when dealing with the nature and function of tragedy, when they deal with the concepts of tragedy and morality. Aristotle’s concept of tragedy is based on a sum total of a few... ? Othello, the Moor of Venice, as a Tragedy of the of the Concerned March 8, Thesis ment...
Reaserch Paper on Othello the Moor of Venice, as a tragedy
6 pages (1500 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle’s Poetics a pamphlet of about fifty pages, incomplete, ill preserved and unsystematic, has proved a book of perennial interest for students of literature. It deals mainly with tragedy and here too with Greek tragedy which alone was known to him. He wrote at a time when there was no literary criticism to go by except Plato’s attacks, not on tragedy as such but on poetry in general. Again and again people refer back to Aristotle, when dealing with the nature... Othello, the Moor of Venice, as a Tragedy of the Name of the Concerned Professor March 8, 2011 Thesis Statement Aristotl...
My Review
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle; Poetics 2 Aristotle; Poetics... OTHELLO A TRAGIC HERO Introduction One Master took up the mantle of another previous Master and wove a tale of great human tragedy. Shakespeare took up the gauntlet thrown by Aristotle, who defined the term Tragic Heroes, and portrayed it to perfection over others. Aristotle, the great philosopher and critic defined a tragedy thus; “Tragedy is the imitation of an action; and an action implies personal agents, who necessarily possess certain distinctive qualities both of character and thought; for it is by these that we qualify actions themselves, and these- thought and character- are the two natural causes from which actions spring, and on actions, again all suc...
Aristotle and the humanities
5 pages (1250 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle and the Humanities The Greek philosopher Aristotle made contributions to the humanities through his ideas about art, as well as philosophy, specifically through his ideas regarding ethics and politics. When it came to art, Aristotle’s Poetics was an answer to Plato’s accusation against the artists for their alleged destruction of rational harmony, as stated in the Republic (Wolff 64). In the field of ethics, Aristotle’s Nichomachean Ethics provided the basis for showing how to live one’s life in the virtuous way and helped people of his times decide on which things were more important in their...
Examine the Role of the Chorus in Plays
10 pages (2500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle had succeeded Sophocles and Euripides in history and he had defined chorus as a “musical dance ensemble (symphonia) that sometimes differs in form, but not in matter.”22 He has elaborated on the concept of chorus in his work, Poetics, as given below: The Chorus too should be regarded as one of the actors; it should be an integral part of the whole, and share in the action, in the manner not of Euripides but of Sophocles... ?Examine the role of the chorus in two or more plays. Sophocles’ Oedipus at Colonus is a play in which chorus has a multiple and very decisive role. For example, it is the chorus that “find[s] in Oedipus an allegory of human existence” 1. The chorus sings expressing a deep...
Examine the role of the chorus in two or more plays.
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle had succeeded Sophocles and Euripides in history and he had defined chorus as a “musical dance ensemble (symphonia) that sometimes differs in form, but not in matter.”22 He has elaborated on the concept of chorus in his work, Poetics, as given below: The Chorus too should be regarded as one of the actors; it should be an integral part of the whole, and share in the action, in the manner not of Euripides... Examine the role of the chorus in two or more plays. Sophocles’ Oedipus at Colonus is a play in which chorus has a multiple and very decisive role. For example, it is the chorus that “find[s] in Oedipus an allegory of human existence” 1. The chorus sings expressing a deep philosophical...
Drama Essay
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle’s definition of a tragic hero. Although Oedipus starts as a noble, being prince by birth and adoption, and ascends to kingship, he later on ends up as a miserable, blind and goes to exile, depicting his ultimate downfall. References Sophocles, ., Storr, F., & Parker, P. M.,. (2005).Sophocles Oedipus trilogy. San Diego, Calif.: ICON Classics. Sophocles, ., Yeats, W. B., & Curtis, J. R. (2008). Sophocles Oedipus at Colonus: Manuscript materials. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Aristotle. (350 B.C.) Poetica XIII. Translated by Butcher, S. H. Retrieved...
Analytical paper on Aristotle
4 pages (1000 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...Poetics.] {Order from Amazon.com} Basic Works of Aristotle, ed. by Richard McKeon (Random House, 1941) {Order from Amazon.com} Aristotle: Introductory Readings, tr. by Terence Irwin and Gail Fine (Hackett, 1996) {Order from Amazon.com} Nichomachean Ethics, tr. by Terence Irwin (Hackett, 1985) {Order from Amazon.com} The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy Wikipedia... ARISTOTLE Aristotle was born in Stagira in north Greece, as the son of Nichomachus, the court physician to the Macedonian royal family. He was trained first in medicine, and then in 367 he was sent to Athens to study philosophy with Plato. He stayed at Plato's Academy until about 347. Though a...
Plato in Apology and Aeschylus in Eumenides
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle, in his Poetics, defined tragedy as "[] an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude [] through pity and fear effecting the proper purgation of these emotions." (Aristotle, Poetics). In this sense, we could say that both Eumenides and the Apology are tragic tales. Both elicit the emotions of pity and fear, and both, through the exposition of the character of their protagonists, afford... Plato in Apology and Aeschylus in Eumenides Jelena Petrovic The closing years of the fifth century BCE in Athens were tumultuous. The Peloponnesian War had been lost to Sparta and a division of the Spartan army garrisoned on the Acropolis. The democracy had been ousted in...
Plato in Apology and Aeschylus in Eumenides
10 pages (2500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle, in his Poetics, defined tragedy as “[…] an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude […] through pity and fear effecting the proper purgation of these emotions.” (Aristotle, Poetics). In this sense, we could say that both Eumenides and the Apology are tragic tales. Both elicit the emotions of pity and fear, and both, through the exposition of the character... Plato in Apology and Aeschylus in Eumenides Jelena Petrovic The closing years of the fifth century BCE in Athens were tumultuous.The Peloponnesian War had been lost to Sparta and a division of the Spartan army garrisoned on the Acropolis. The democracy had been ousted in place of a group of thirty...
Essay 1
3 pages (750 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle. Poetics. Trans. S. H. Butcher. The Internet Classics Archive. Web Atomic and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 13 Sept. 2007. Web. 4 Nov. 2008. ‹http://classics.mit.edu/›. Langhamer, Claire. “Love and Courtship in Mid-Twentieth-Century England.” Historical Journal 50.1 (2007): 173-96. ProQuest. Web. 27 May 2009.... Prometheus and the Stealing of Fire The Fire Thief Prometheus, the son of Themis or Gaia (Earth) as she is called by many names, is an immortal god. He is believed to have created mankind out of clay, or on other accounts, out of earth and water, and gave them all the favourable qualities possessed by the other animals. He is the “giver of fire, the inventor of the useful...
English - World Literature Oedipus Rex, Sophocles
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle’s Poetics. The task for the modern actor is to take an ancient story dealing with a society that has long since vanished and to make his character real to the audience. The tragedy of a man who unknowingly kills his own father, marries his mother and his children with her creates the kind of nightmarish situation that any audience member should be able to relate to. The task of the actor, and of the director who guides him, is to portray this tragic situation in a manner that makes it real to a modern audience. It is this type of guidance that will be explored in the imaginary letter immediately following... Assignment 2b: A Director’s Letter on Oedipus Rex The ment of Intent While Oedipus...
Aristotle Greek Philosopher History
9 pages (2250 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle embraced rhetoric and poetics along with metaphysics and politics. He justified the praises by Cicero, Quintilian and Dionysius in his own style. Aristotle greatly imitated Plato’s dialogues in his own writings. (Wians, pp.2-7) Political Theory of Aristotle According to Aristotle, the most important role of a politician is to maintain law and order in the city-state by forming an appropriate governing body. The aim should be to spread law, customs and moral education to the citizens. Once... Aristotle Greek Philosopher History The Greek philosopher Aristotle was born in 384 BC in Stagira which is a town in Northern Greece. His father was Nicomachus and he was both a doctor and friend of King ...
Existentialism and Art
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle Poetics. New York: Dover Publications. Carroll, N. (2000). Theories of Art Today. USA: The University of Wisconsin Press. Carroll, N. (1999). Philosophy of Art: A Contemporary Introduction. London: Routledge. Plato. (n.d). The Republic. USA: Plain Label Books. Thompson, J. M. (1999). Twentieth Century Theories of Art. Canada: Carleton University Press. Tolstoy, L. (1996). What is Art?. USA: Hackett Publishing.... to him, art is a form of communication that can take various forms. If it succeeds in developing an emotion, it is an art. Aristotle and Art According to the Aristotelian view, art is an imitation of life. He starts his theory of art with the claim that...
Renaissance Art
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle in his treatise entitled, “Poetics”. Aristotle has maintained that the “…life and soul, so to speak of tragedy is the plot” and the characters occupy a secondary importance (Aristotle 15). However, in “Dr. Faustus”, it is evident that the protagonist, Faustus, is the life and soul of the entire tragic action that occurs throughout the play. The plots or events revolve around him and are therefore, of secondary importance. Hence, it can... ?Renaissance means “rebirth” and is seen as a time of intellectual growth and cultural progress. Looking at the major concepts and ideals representedin Renaissance art and literature, what is the degree of originality and “newness” of things produced during...
How Sophocles' Oedipus exemplifies Aristotle's definition of a tragic hero?
6 pages (1500 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle as “poems representing action” in his work named ‘Poetics’ (Aristotle, 2009, Section 1). Aristotle also talks about the classification of drama into “Tragedy and Comedy,” (Aristotle) and furthermore, defines tragedy as the “imitation of an action that is serious and also... ?How Sophocles’ Oedipus Exemplifies Aristotle’s Definition of a Tragic Hero Thesis: Upon analyzing the drama, it becomes clear that Sophocles indeed exemplifies Aristotle’s definition of a tragic hero through the key elements of Oedipus’ hamartia (tragic flaw), peripeteia, anagnorisis, downfall, getting more than what is deserved etc and the plot epitomizes tragedy through imitation, arousal of pity and fear in the audience...
Aristotle and relationships at work
7 pages (1750 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle, his ideas and the significance of Aristotalian Philosophy to Contemporary Work Relationships. Greek Philosopher Aristotle, born in 384 BC, is one of the central figures of modern philosophy. As a teacher and prolific writer, his teachings reached every aspect of western thought. His most important philosophical works are arguably Politics, Poetics, De Anima and Nicomachean Ethics. His themes of universality, logic and the individual versus humanity are cultural mainstays and can apply to many elements of one’s life. One of these elements in the workplace, and how intrapersonal relationships function within the...
Political theatre
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle, Poetics), and political theatre in general aims at representing social, political, cultural problems to the audience, political theatre in the modern period does not only represent but politicizes the representations, by either breaking the traditional representations or reinforcing them. They are sometimes known as experimental theatre or post-modern theatre (Auslander, 1987). In a way, they are part of any representations in any theatre and there is no more a separate political theatre. This is true... of the radical change in the literary theory, there is no more exclusive political theatre but all performances are political discourses in some way (Baz Kershaw, The Radical in...
Philosopher's Biography: Aristotle
7 pages (1750 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle had devised a unique method of research while exploring different aspects of a discipline while making an analysis. “His common methods of philosophizing include his focus on basic biological facts, his integration of ideas with the basic principles of his philosophical system, and his analyses of his predecessors.” (Hsieh, 2002: 2) On Literature: His famous work under the title Poetics (340 B.C) serves as the guiding star to the poets, playwrights and pen-men alike... Module Module ID: Aristotle Aristotle serves as one of the most distinguished personalities the world has ever produced. By dint of his God-gifted wisdom, extraordinary talent, outstanding foresight, innate curiosity of learning ...
Comparing oedipus and antigone as tragic heroes
6 pages (1500 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle first laid down the rules for defining tragedy in his Poetics. In its origins in ancient Greek drama, a tragic hero could only be a member of royalty and almost always male. By Shakespeare's day the gender mattered slightly less, though bloodlines still retained a high level of import. Today's tragic hero can be male or female, come from any stratum of society, can hold any job, literally be anyone. Along with these admirable amendments to the rules, however, have come other differences in defining that a tragic hero is. In contemporary popular drama, by which is typically meant film... Antigone and Oedipus as Tragic Figures The conception of tragic heroes has changed significantly since...
Social Message in Dramas
5 pages (1250 words) , Book Report/Review
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle's poetics to analyse theses themes and shades of tragedy within the two plays.analysis of these two plays. According to Aristotle tragedy within poetry and drama arouses the sense of pity and fear and my paper explores these themes within these two dramas. The notion of the perfect "American Dream" is a prominent theme with in the empty life of both the protagonists portraying life in the fifties era.)Death of Salesman was authored by Arthur... ' The tumultuous vultures of desire ,hope ,fear ,disappointment and tragedy manifest themselves in the themes of the two plays , "Death of a Salesman," and "A Raisin in the Sun," .It is worth mentioning at the outset that there will be a use of the...
Creative piece of writing and rationale
8 pages (2000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle, in his renowned Poetics, views men mere objects of imitation. “Since the objects of imitation are men in action, he argues, and these men must be either of a higher or a lower type, it follows that we must represent men either as better than in real life, or as worse, or as they are. It is the same in painting.” (Aristotle: Poetics, Chapter 2) Poetry, drama, novel, fiction, prose, essay, short story and sonnets are the main literary genres, among which romance maintains the most significant place that has captured the attention of the readers especially during the modern and post modern times. Different...
Oedipus the King and The Importance of Being Earnest
6 pages (1500 words) , Book Report/Review
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle's poetics states that tragedy should evoke in the audience feelings of "fear and pity" (Aristotle, 20), and this is exactly what ancient and modern audiences alike would experience. A plague-ridden city, a distraught king, the notion of "pollution" are bound to provoke in the audience certain "prescribed"reactions. Given that the audience is exposed almost at once to an epidemic of terrifying contagious illness, to the wraith of the gods, the old curse and murder, is there any possibility of the play developing in more... Sur 29 March 2007 Compare the opening scenes of Oedipus the King and The Importance of Being Earnest. In what ways are the elements and forces that will lead to the...
Characterization in A Farewell to Arms
8 pages (2000 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle, Poetics, Courier Dover Publications, 1997 2. Dahiya, Bhim S. Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms: a Critical study, Academic foundation, 1992 3. Berridge, Howard R. and Ernest Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to arms. Baron’s Educational series, 1984. 4. Glasser, William A. “A Farewell to arms”, The Sewanee review, 7.2 (Spring 1966): 453-469 5. Hemingway, Ernest, A Farewell to arms, Simon and Schuster, 1997 6. Stoltzfus, Ben, Lacan and literature: purloined pretexts, SUNY Press, 1996 7. Tyler, Lisa, Student companion to Ernest Hemingway, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001... for Catherine Barkley, and her death, in order to sort through the devastating nature of his...
Macbeth Essay
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle (384BC -322 BC) who defined the dramatic form of Tragedy in his great work “Poetics”. According to Aristotle, a tragic hero should never be perfect. The fall of a completely virtuous person from a height will create only moral... ? The ics always reflect the human situations of their times, either directly or symbolically. It is this relevance to their times that makes these classics relevant for all times. If one examines the socio-political fabric of today, one sees overambitious politicians trying to stick on to power by any means. They do not mind cheating or even destroying their own comrades to keep their autocratic rule in tact. One can have examples from Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin...
Oedipus The King Research Paper
5 pages (1250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle praised Oedipus the King for its tragic arc and used the play as his model for a perfect tragedy in his Poetics. Oedipus is a perfect tragic hero because his situation arouses in us both pity and fear, Aristotle explains: “For pity is aroused by someone who undeservedly falls into misfortune, and fear is evoked by our recognizing that it is someone like ourselves... Knowledge and Despair: Oedipus the King as Existential Hero Do not despise the frontiers in which we must live, Do not cross them, do not talk of them, But bow before the places where the gods are throned. Time will come with cruel vengeance on the man Who disobeys; that is the punishment For those who are proud and are more than ...
Racialism in 'Country Lovers' and 'What it's Like to be a Black Girl'
9 pages (2250 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle, Poetics, trans., Richard Janko, Indianapolis, IN, Hackett, Ashford Online Library 2007. Baym, N. et al, eds., Norton Anthology of American Literature, third edition, Volume 2, New York, W.W. Norton, 2009. Berman, P., "Brief Encounters", Village Voice, Ashford Online Library, 28 February 2008, 46. Clugston, R. W. (2010a). Country Lovers, Nadine Gordimer. In Journey into literature (chapter 3) Retrieved fromhttps://content.ashford.edu/books/AUENG125.10.2/sections/h3.2 Clugston, R. W. (2010b). Poems for Reflection. In Journey into literature (chapter 12 section 2). Retrieved from https://content.ashford.edu/books/AUENG125.10.2/sections/sec12.2...
(Elements of Drama) - "Drama imitates reality through representation rather than imitation".
7 pages (1750 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle’s “Poetics”. At the end we will drew conclusions about the representation of reality in these two tragedies. In this work we hypothesize that drama imitates reality through... Drama imitates reality through representation rather than imitation 2006 Outline Introduction A. Definition of Tragedy B. Parts and Characteristic Features of Tragedy C. “Oedipus Rex” by Sophocles D. “Fences” by August Wilson E. Reality representation in both tragedies Conclusions Description In this paper we will briefly overview the structure, language and characteristic features of two pieces of tragedy “Oedipus Rex” by Sophocles and “Fences” by August Wilson. We will also analyze these plays with regard to the Aristotl...
Hamlets Tragic Flaws
6 pages (1500 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle believes that art - in any form, whether it be music or literature - is “in its general conception modes of imitation.” This first point in Poetics is the basis on which he builds a large part of his theory on dramatic poetry. He believes that the true purpose of a tragedy is to arouse pity and fear in the audience to a point where it culminates in a purgation of such emotions – catharsis. In ancient Greek, the purpose of plays and dramatic performances was not to entertain, but to contribute to the good health of the community... The [The [The Hamlet’s Tragic Flaws Thesis ment Hamlet is an endearing character with his own remarkable qualities; however his inability to act upon his convictions...
Characterization in A Farewell to Arms
7 pages (1750 words) , Research Paper
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle, Poetics, Courier Dover Publications, 1997 2. Dahiya, Bhim S. Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms: a Critical study, Academic foundation, 1992 3. Berridge, Howard R. and Ernest Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to arms. Baron’s Educational series, 1984. 4. Glasser, William A. “A Farewell to arms”, The Sewanee review, 7.2 (Spring 1966): 453-469 5. Hemingway, Ernest, A Farewell to arms, Simon and Schuster, 1997 6. Stoltzfus, Ben, Lacan and literature: purloined pretexts, SUNY Press, 1996 7. Tyler, Lisa, Student companion to Ernest Hemingway, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001... Barkley, and her death, in order to sort through the devastating nature of his experience.” (Stoltzfus, 66)...
Modern greek literature
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle Poetics. 350 BCE Prentice Hall Inc. 2003 E. Keeley and P. Bien, ed., Modern Greek Writers (1972); C. A. Trypanis, Greek Poetry from Homer to Sefaris (1981) (Retrieved in http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1E1-Greeklit-m.html) High Beam Encyclopedia. Modern Greek Literature. Old and Sold Antique Digest. Contemporary... MODERN GREEK LITERATURE Introduction: Renowned Greek philosopher of ancient times i.e. Plato views literature as the imitation of life. (Republic 380 B.C.) In other words, the literature of a particular era portrays social norms, cultural values, ethical patterns and moral beliefs prevailing in the social set up of that time. For example, Shakespearean tragedies and comedies depict...
Aristotle
2 pages (500 words) , Assignment
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle is an ancient Greek philosopher whose works have been very influential in modern dayscience and philosophy. Aristotle rose to prominence after the death of his master, Plato. Among his legendary works include his writings on ethics. Aristotle’s ethics represented a significant shift from traditional ethics taught by his predecessors Socrates and Plato (Pakaluk and Giles, 2010). Nicomachean ethics is a collection of ten different books written by Aristotle on various topics in ethics. Also known as Aristotelian ethics, Nicomachean ethics has had a huge impact on modern day philosophy and law as well as influencing many modern day thinkers. Nicomachean... Nicomachean Ethics Nicomachean Ethics...
Aristotle
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
Only on StudentShare
...Aristotle What are the foundations of Aristotle’s theory of art? Aristotle’s views on art are the conglomeration of secular and spiritual approaches in tandem with the concepts of western philosophy. According to him, art is the honest form of representation of life. It is the combination of imagination and imitation by observing the life from the practical point of view. He articulates a definite method of evaluating art in his writing. The true object of art must represent some definite perspective or object of life, according to him. An artist gets inspiration from nature and the ever-changing world around him, he confronts new situations and develops innovative... Essay, Philosophy Topic:...
Aristotle
1 pages (250 words) , Download 1 , Essay
...Aristotle, a good person would perform her/his duties not for the sake of another person but for the sake of happiness. The act of virtue is thus, not merely one of charity but is also directed towards the fulfillment of one’s own desires. This however, does not mean that one does not experience difficulties while dispensing with goodness. Amaly would need to exercise a great deal of restraint while she is at her job. At every point in her work, she would have to remind herself of the discipline and effort that is required... Virtue The person described, Amaly Yossef, is able to achieve the Aristotelian notion of virtue through adhering to certain s and also by doing so voluntarily. According to...
1 - 50 results of 500 items