Aristotles' slavery
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...Aristotle Slavery Aristotle permits as persuasive indeterminacies between logic and rhetoric, between the literal and the figurative, between philosophy and philology. We need to be Pickwickian philosophers to understand him. Philosophers say Pickwick are too often content with examining the things that lie before them without looking to the truths that are hidden beyond. Aristotle states that a slave is a possession, “A possession is something we use and a slave belongs to us. “Aristotle says a slave is a man with conscious for an animal like a sheep and cannot be enslaved. The bodily parts such as arm, leg, hand, and eye that he uses in the service of all even if it is the hand he raises...
Aristotles virtue ethics
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...Aristotle’s virtue ethics is all about the separation between the s of the character. That is to say, Aristotle s that the good actions lead toward happiness and the bad ones lead toward unhappiness. In this respect it is vital to note that he saw happiness as a result of an excellent behavior before gods and the society. Each individual is able to have the virtues, and the habits provide people with the ability to fulfill such virtues toward nature or contrary to nature (Cited in Dwyer 68). Thus, Aristotle aimed at discovering the character rather than an action in a person. The main goal of his virtue theory is to reach out the...
Aristotles Politics
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...Aristotle's Politics Aristotle's Politics, written around 350 BCE, enquires into how best people should be governed. It touches on a variety of subjects-the nature of a household and a state, and the differences between running a household and a state; what makes a person a slave, and who is a free person; are some people born to be slaves; the relationship between a master and a slave; the economic life of a state, and how wealth is created; who is better suited to rule-the man of action or the thinker; is it better to be a man of action or is it better to be a thinker; what kind of education should be given to the young. And so on. The core of this...
Aristotles Politics
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...Aristotle - book - The Politics One of the most influential and enduring works of political philosophy in the history of humanity, Aristotle’s Politics is generally considered as the continuation of the Nicomachean Ethics and both of them together deal with the philosophy of human affairs. This work by Aristotle is known for the great philosopher’s discussion of the various aspects of politics based on the Greek city-state, otherwise known as polis. It is essential to realize that Politics is one of the classics of the history of political philosophy and it keeps the same grand mood all through it. An understanding of the historical...
Aristotles Views
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...Aristotle's Views Aristotle was a Greek philosopher, physicist, poet and a popular of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great (Wikimedia Foundation, Inc). He was able to produce books such as Nichomachean Ethics which describes the "happy life intended for one by nature as one lived in accordance with virtue" and Politics which gives analysis on political community (Clayton). As a philosopher and a political scientist, Aristotle was able to observe communities so that he was able to describe the relationship of men, especially to his community. One of his famous lines says that, "the man who is incapable of working in common, or who in his self-sufficiency has no need of others, is no part... ...
Aristotles View of Friendship
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...Aristotle's View of Friendship- Nicomanchean Ethics When the Greek philosopher Aristotle wrote about friendship among people and among s two thousand years ago, it was as true to human nature as it is now, in the twenty first century. In his book on Nicomachean Ethics, the great philosopher dwells extensively on family and friendship. Defining friendship, he elaborates on the kinds of friendship and the advantages of friendship, and tells us how to treat our friends. Dwelling on the merits of having friends, Aristotle says that everybody needs friends, be he rich or poor. Even the powerful man would need friends. A rich man would need...
Aristotles Nicomachean Ethics
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...Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics Whether or not lawmakers are more serious about justice or friendship would be seen from the arguments that would be presented in this paper. A logical conclusion would be reached and the reason for the assertion would also be established in this short paper. The argument put forward in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics is that lawmakers are more serious about friendship than justice. The reason for this is that, the lawgivers believe that, friendship is actually the bond that holds states together and for the states to continue being closely knitted into one; they must not treat the issue of friendship with levity. The lawmakers’ premise... is that, when there is...
1.What relevance does Aristotles notion of political virtue have to modern conceptions of citizenship?
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...Aristotle’s Political Virtue and Modern Conceptions of Citizenship number] 4 January 2006 Aristotle’s Political Virtue and Modern Conceptions of Citizenship Several key moments in history helped to develop the definition and importance of citizens in society: Aristotle’s Politics, the constitution of Athens, Roman republics, city-states of 13th century Italy, Geneva, the English Civil War and its commonwealth ideology, republicanism of the Enlightenment, the American Declaration of Independence, the Declaration of the Rights of Man, and republican despotism of the French Revolution’s Committee of Public Safety. With each event, the role of...
Aristotles Nicomachean Ethics
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...Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics Topic Human Good Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics is the first treatise of ethics, and what standards man ought to live, in recorded Western philosophy to date. In the Ethics, Aristotle defines ethics as the art of living well or living with excellence. As opposed to later philosophical treatises in Western discourse, the Nicomachean Ethics is not an attempt of morals of what man should and should not do, and what those "dos and don'ts" are, but rather an explanation or model for self-cultivation of ones own virtues and excellence. To necessitate this, Aristotle must define the conception of the good for humanity, and what sort or actions... Seminar in Ancient Philosophy...
Aristotles Nicomachean Ethics
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...Aristotle a ‘base’ or ‘corrupt’ person ‘does not appear to be disposed in a friendly way even toward himself.’ Aristotle based this on several factors. First a person celebrates, grieves, and goes through other emotions with themselves more than anyone else. Second base and corrupt people feel that others are just as base and corrupt as themselves. Finally, base and corrupt people think harmful ways are normal. All of these reasons are the basis of Aristotle’s thoughts. A person feels emotions primarily within themselves. If they are base and corrupt, then these emotions are experienced primarily. Base and corrupt thoughts are not friendly, thus an individual does not feel that way... According to...
Platos and Aristotles Political Ideologies
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...Aristotle’s Political Ideologies Plato and Aristotle are the world’s oldest philosophers. Plato was a student of Socrates, another great thinker while Aristotle was a student of Plato. Plato is considered the first writer of philosophical politics, and Aristotle is regarded as the first political scientist. These two men had different ideas on how to improve the societies in their lives. It is surprisingly evident that the similar debates that lead to Plato and Aristotle’s works exist in our society today. These debates seek to answer the following questions: What is the best kind of human life? What is the best kind of political rule or regime? Moreover... Comparing and Contrasting Plato’s and...
Aristotles Criteria and Apology by Socrates
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...Aristotle’s Criteria and Apology by Socrates Distinguished ancient Greekphilosopher, critic and intellectual, Aristotle (384-322 B.C) has, in his famous Poetics (335 B.C), elucidated various aspects related to different genres of literature. The principles established in the Poetics, have widely been being imitated by the writers, poets and playwrights belonging to divergent cultures and civilizations for the last twenty three centuries. Aristotle has also explained different literary terms, which determine the comprehensive criteria in order to make distinction between a refined and mean piece of literature. Socrates’ Apology carries out all the condition of a refined literary... Module Module ID:...
Compare and contrast aristotles and platos idea of the good
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...Aristotle’s Idea of The Good As for Plato and Aristotle, the fundamental idea of theGood is necessarily connected to their metaphysics and epistemology. In the Republic, Plato establishes a hierarchy among the Ideas, with the Idea of the Good as the unconditioned principle of the truth and being of the all other Ideas. Thus, the Good is also that which is knowledgeable and wise, that is to say, that which leads to truth. On the other hand, for Aristotle, the Good is the final and last end of all human actions, for this end is what constitutes the Good. Human beings do not act unless he thinks that the object of his action is good. Thus... ?Nargis Kadirzada Mr. Ramirez Philosophy 14 April Plato and...
Aristotles Political Virtue and Modern Conceptions of Citizenship
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...Aristotle's Political Virtue and Modern Conceptions of Citizenship number] 4 January 2006 Aristotle's Political Virtue and Modern Conceptions of Citizenship Several key moments in history helped to develop the definition and importance of citizens in society: Aristotle's Politics, the constitution of Athens, Roman republics, city-states of 13th century Italy, Geneva, the English Civil War and its commonwealth ideology, republicanism of the Enlightenment, the American Declaration of Independence, the Declaration of the Rights of Man, and republican despotism of the French Revolution's Committee of Public Safety. With each event, the role...
Aristotles ethics: From Virtue to Friendship, the Golden Mean
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...Aristotle's ethics: From Virtue to Friendship, the Golden Mean." "Every art and every inquiry, and similarly every action and pursuit, is thought to aim at some good; and for this reason the good has rightly been declared to be that at which all things aim." - 1094a (Nicomachean Book I, Ch. 1) To Aristotle, Happiness is the result of doing the right thing, and the right thing is the action that results from Virtue. Virtue, on the other hand, is the condition that one achieves when he follows the Middle Way, or the way of temperance. Ethical Virtue is the intermediate between excess and deficiency. If one seeks to be virtuous, one must seek goodness. To Aristotle, good actions are those... , or at least not without reason". That is, one needs to understand what one is good at, what sets one apart from others, and by consistently doing it, fulfillment can be achieved. According to this philosopher, there are only two things for the man to do, which are reasoning and following reasoning, or perhaps feeling and transmitting, or maybe reflecting and acting. "The Virtuous person sees the truth in each case, being as it were a standard and measure of them". Aristotle does not think that merely doing good actions is enough. One needs to nurture Virtue, and it is trough Virtue that true goodness arises spontaneously. It's more or less like in the old story that you...
Similarities and Differences between Aristotles and Platos Ideal City State
4 pages (1000 words) , Admission/Application Essay
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...Aristotle’s and Plato’s Ideal Aristotle and Plato and their views on the ideal Greek city-state have been a subject of debate, especially in the political arena. Some of their ideals have been used in modern governance and politics. This essay focuses on the differences and similarities in the ideals and principles that both Aristotle and Plato share. Aristotle critically examines the political institutions in his time and in the Greek world (Brophy 139). He believes that the needs of the city vary greatly due to the differences in citizen’s wealth, population and their social class. He explains that an ideal city-state should be organized in such a way... Similarities and Differences between...
John Lockes and Aristotles Understanding of Moral Life
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...Aristotle’s understanding of moral life and model of governance Introduction John Locke and Aristotle both focused their attention on how humans coped in a free state of nature, contrary to a structured society. They also explored how government was formed and the purpose that such governments served on behalf of the people. Further, Locke and Aristotle had a common interest in terms of advocating for the equality of people. This included an examination of rights that should be accorded to the people. In terms of governance, Locke and Aristotle concur that deviations with regard to the rule of law may be necessary at times; however, their primary reasons tend to differ (Maloy, 2009... John Locke and...
The Main Difference between Aristotles Account of Virtue and Socrates Account of Virtue
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...Aristotle’s Account of Virtue and Socrates’ Account of Virtue Aristotle’s philosophy is said to be an intellectual achievement which is extraordinary. His claims and arguments have endured as important landmarks of philosophy. They are also viewed as intellectual endeavors according to Tenenbaum (50), Socrates account of philosophy goes to the fifth century, and he relates virtue to knowledge. He bases the individuals’ action on the knowledge of the good and evil. According to Aristotle virtue occupies a central place in individual’s happiness. This is because it identifies happiness as an activity of the soul which goes together with virtue. Aristotle argues... ? Number: The Main Difference between...
Choose one play text and analyse the extent to which it illustrates at least two of Aristotles elements of tragedy.
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...Aristotle’s theory in the Poetics outlines a clear and complete description of a tragedy and its six elements. In this essay I will analyze Euripides’ Medea and two of Aristotle’s elements: plot-structure, and character within the play. The analysis will include Aristotle’s aspects of a high standard tragedy, looking at the organization of the events in the play, and the exploration of the character of Medea in connection with Aristotle’s characters. Medea’s actions are consistent throughout the whole play and are more likely... to be predictable-as sudden or reversal. Aristotle states that the main sequence of the tragedy is found in the plot– structure; which...
Compare and contrast Plato and Aristotles separate views on the individuals relationship to society/ Cicero poses questions about power and ethics .
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...Aristotle on the Individual’s Relationship to Society Both Aristotle and Plato believe in the idea of the division of labor in society. This means that both philosophers believe that in order to make the society work, people should work harmoniously. For Aristotle, the people in a society must cooperate with each other as the members of a family would (Aristotle, Politics I.3). Plato agrees with Aristotle on the idea of cooperation but proposes a people grouped into farmers, builders, clothiers and so on, and adds that there must be guardians who possess “the love of wisdom…high spirit and quickness and strength” (Plato, Republic 376c). These guardians, who are either soldiers or rulers... Plato and...
The Flourishing Villain?
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...Aristotle, human flourishing stays for the innate potential of persons to lead a life of enduring happiness, which is different from a pleasure of feeling good. In this context, the condition of attaining the state of flourishing is exercising personal virtues. Subsequently, an evil person cannot be flourishing as he/she does not fulfill the condition of its acquisition. In order to realize why an evil person cannot flourish, one has to look at the qualities, which Aristotle attributed to virtues. Firstly, a virtuous action or habit always stays between the limits of excess and deficiency, which can be defined as vices. (Brown, 2001) For example, braver person... Happiness and Flourishing According to...
Discussion
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...Aristotle ____________ Grade Course: __________________ Dated: July-05-2009 Principle of Charity and its significance The principle of charity refers to the philosophy where the listener understands and make attempts to grasp the school of thoughts about an argument or a belief by interpreting the speakers argument. In oriental philosophy, it is important to adopt this logical principle so as to welcome new ideas which might prove helpful to the listener at some point in his understanding to a new construction. This methodological principle allows the listener to be optimistic... Principle of Charity Discussion about principle of charity, its significance, and comparison with God of Moses, Abraham and...
Philosophy in daily experience
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...Aristotle’s Metaphysics which goes something like this that every person... Philosophy in daily experience It was today that I visited my Aunt. She has two children, a boy and agirl. The boy is 18 years old, whereas the girl is 15 years old. When I reached at aunt’s house I saw that she seemed to be a bit stressed about something. I asked her what the matter was; she replied that her daughter has failed the exam. She said that Sally (her daughter) is an intelligent kid but she does not seem to be interested in studies. She is interested in sports, especially basketball, as she was also the captain of the girls’ basketball team in school. My aunt never restricted her children from taking part in any extra...
CULTURAL AND ETHICAL VALUES
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...Aristotles Best Attainable Form of Government Two of Aristotles fundamental philosophical concerns were to understand the best forms political arrangement on the one hand and the nature of human well-being on the other. In Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle introduced the concept of virtue, and he claimed that the same was of two kinds: ethical and intellectual (350BC/2004, p. 23). He maintained that every individual bore the prospect of becoming ethically wise, when wisdom is exercised with good judgment (Aristotle & Crisp, 2004, p. 117). Importantly, Aristotle argued that virtue was something to be found in ones soul, occurring in a state of moderation, as in between two extreme states... The Golden Mean:...
Critique of Aristotle's Politics
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...Aristotle politics Introduction This paper aims to discuss the thoughts of Aristotle as the philosopher of his time. The paper will examine the applicability of his ideas in the world today. It will analyze the ethics of Aristotle against the way today’s governance. This paper will offer an informed critique of Aristotle’s politics. The paper will discuss the prepositions of Aristotle and the merits and demerits associated with each leadership. Discussion Aristotle politics looks at the world scientifically and can differentiate the ideal and the practical. In his book one of politics, Aristotle outlines the different types of governments that he perceives. In each of these types... Critique of...
MidTerm Two
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...Aristotle argues that happy life that nature intents for man are that lived in accordance to man’s virtue and within his politics. Aristotle compares politics to the inferiority of women and holds to the fact that women are left out in politics. He argues that people can only participate in politics if they are happy and virtuous (Connors 132). He believed that politics and ethics are closely related that the virtuous and ethical life is only available to people who take part in politics and that the main purpose of political community is moral education. Plato on the other side argues that the best rational political order leads to harmony and unity in a society. He says... that behaviors...
Philosophy
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...Aristotle ical Theory on Ethics Aristotle’s ical Theory on Ethics Aristotle through his ical theory regarded the field of study developed by Socrates and Plato as Aristotle’s ethics. It composed of self-realization and naturalism which comprise virtues that an individual possess and that are responsible for his or her behavior. This theory expounds and scrutinizes the good and bad habits that people have which determine their way of life. Aristotle argued that it was significant that a person should develop virtues because they will achieve excellence in both character and activities such as their goals...
Ethical Theories chart
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...Aristotles moral theory Founder Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill Immanuel Kant and W.D Ross Aristotle Major Principle The moral status of an action relies on the consequences of the action. The morally right thing to do in any circumstance is whatever will have the best outcome; for instance, if it brings most of the people delight or happiness (Rainbow, 2002). They stick to the principle according to which whatever matters regarding whether an action is correct or wrong is the answer why it has been done as fulfilling our duty is what really matters. The theory holds... Ethical Theories Chart s: of ethical perspective Consequentialism Deontology Virtue Theory Exemplar Utilitarianism Kantian Ethics...
Teleological and Deontological Frameworks
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...Aristotles science of nature. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.... framework Teleological framework Ethical egoism is based on the relief that every individual should act in a way to promote himself or herself if the net result will generate, on balance, positive rather than negative results. 2. Utilitarianism the action of an individual will be based on providing the greatest good for the greatest number of people. It is nearly impossible to evaluate its effectiveness due to the fact that one cannot determine what would be the greatest good for the greatest number of people. 3. Sedgwick’s dualism attempts to bridge the gap between the frameworks of ethical egoism and utilitarianism. The limitat...
Question1: Which Way to The Weir?
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...Aristotles Unities Section Movies based on legal procedures have never been appreciated by me, but this was different 12 angry men. Watching justice prevail was one experience that compelled or rather made me remain attentive the whole of the 99 minutes. The characters understood their scripts as this could be portrayed by smooth jury procedures. I must admit the movie inspired me to be a lawyer. The three famous unities according to the Aristotelian are the unities of time, place as well as action. The unity of time narrows the duration of an action to a day while that of place limits the locality or where the actions are meant to occur. Finally, the unity of actions restricts only... Business:...
Two Important Virtues
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...Aristotle Introduction A virtue is defined as a character’s trait that enables an individual to flourish. Virtues are also referred to as good habits. According to Aristotle, people obtain virtues through practice. He also indicated that a set of virtues can lead an individual towards his or her natural happiness and excellence. He demonstrated various virtues that are essential to make a person live a flourishing and successful life as the document discusses (Hibbs, 2001). Discussion Braveness and industriousness are two very crucial virtues that Aristotle developed that can help an individual to flourish and succeed in life. However... Two important virtues Two important virtues as demonstrated by...
What is the main difference between Aristotle's account of virtue and Socrates' account of virtue? Who has the more plausible view?
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...Aristotles account of virtue and Socrates account of virtue? Who has the more plausible view? What is the main difference between Aristotles account of virtue and Socrates account of virtue? Who has the more plausible view? Traditionally, the motives of human behaviour attracts are among the key issues discussed in philosophy. Efforts have been made to identify the values and ethics on which human actions are based. Virtue is one of these values. The views of philosophers, like Socrates and Aristotle on virtue have attracted the interest of academics worldwide. At a first level, both Socrates and Aristotle refer to virtue as a general term – i.e. they do... not explain particularly each...
Fallacies
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...Aristotles Theory of Fallacy. Argumentation, 27(1), p31-47. Janez, B. (2014). CRITICAL THINKING IN EDUCATION: WHY TO AVOID LOGICAL FALLACIES. Problems of Education in the 21st Century, 61(1), p18-27.... Insert Insert Question a Fallacies are arguments that are deductively invalid and have very little inductive strength. At first, they appear to be correct. Elaborated below are the various fallacy categories. Naturalistic fallacy In this kind of fallacy, subjects try to substantiate their arguments based on nature, i.e. referring to them as natural. They are very common, and we often do not see the problem with this kind of fallacy due to accepted social and moral norms (Boss, 2010). For example claiming ...
Sparta vs. Athens ("Lycurgus" vs. "Pericles Funeral Oration")
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...Aristotles “Best Regime”: Kingship, Democracy, and the Rule of Law. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2003: 12-26 Bogotch IE, Educational Leadership and Social Justice: Theory into Practice. J. Sch. Leadership. 2002, 12(2): 138-156. Calderwood, P.E. (2003). Toward a Professional community for social justice. J. Transformative Educ. 1(4): 301-320 Collins, Susan D. Aristotle and the Rediscovery of Citizenship, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. Galston, William A. Justice and the Human Good. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980: 18-78 Huxley, G. “On Aristotles Best State.” In Paul Cartledge and F. D. Harvey (eds.) Crux: Essays Presented... Sparta vs. Athens Lycurgus" vs....
Question# D: What is Reality? What is Illusion? Question # E:Aristotle on Happiness. Question # F: The Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path
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...Aristotle on Happiness. Please explain:" Aristotles breadth of knowledge and exploration is amazing. Some of his most interesting ideas center around the ideas of happiness and virtue. What do you think about Aristotles suggestions for the happy life and the cultivation of virtue. Choose a virtue (e.g., courage, moderation, patience, responsibility, etc.) and also determine the excess and deficiency. Explore the meaning of this virtue and practice it through the week. Aristotle introduced ethical principles that lead to discernment... Question# D: What is Reality? What is Illusion? Question D please explain:"Plato is very specific about Reality and Illusion in his allegory of the cave. Express your...
Decide for yourself what tragedy is, and then examine Oedipus the King and Death of a Salesman as tragedies. How are they different from or similar to one another? Realizing that 2400 years separate these plays, what do these differences/ similarities mea
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...Aristotles Concept of Tragedy Tragedy It is a common thing in the society that a person of a high social class or one of a royal reign would always have a good life full or happiness, success and good ending. However, the tragedy is used to refer to a situation where such a character in a drama ends up ruining his life or suffering from his consequences as a result of the wrongs that he has committed. A tragedy, therefore, sets in when a character in a drama which may have had the characteristics such as pride, doing wrong things and being unlawful, is rewarded with a bad ending in life. It sometimes comes in form death, sickness, loss of property and loss of power....
Knowledge
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...Aristotles Nicomachean Ethics SELF 1. -The ancient theories of soul The Greek Notion of soul Presocratic thinking about the Soul Understanding of Plato’s Tripartite, Understanding the concept... Paper Knowledge The below bullet points are some of the areas to be studied to answer the questions listed under knowledge and self assessments 1. John Locke’s Theory of Knowledge and human understanding John Locke’s philosophy on mind and thought; an analysis on how human beings think and express themselves through logic, language and religious practices. Reading of the book The Epistle to the reader and how he describes his involvement in the philosophical mode of thinking Understanding of t...
Aristotle rhetoric
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...ARISTOTLE RHETORIC The art of communication is effective in convincing the audience in any situation and this ability defines who an orator is.In public speaking, the connection between ideas, emotions and perception work together to influence the direction of success for any form of interpersonal interaction. Aristotle is one of the global icons who advanced the idea of rhetoric as a science although it should not absolutely be considered as such. To make a clear understanding of rhetoric and its use in the present day political process, it would be important to identify its three species as defined by Aristotle. An overall belief of Aristotle in respect to rhetoric is that it can help... in...
Aristotle's Model of Persuasion: Is It Still Relevant Today?
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...Aristotles Model of Persuasion: Is It Still Relevant Today? Aristotle is considered to be one of thefounders of modern western philosophy and is known for his many contributions to science and the liberal arts. Amongst his many writings is a famous work on Rhetoric which can also be considered the first important piece in the field of interpersonal communication. Even though more than two millennia have passes since the writing of the book, the suggestions and methods described by Aristotle are as valid today as they were when they were written. There are many reasons for that and they can be clarified with examples from our daily...
Aristotle
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...Aristotles Three Persuasive Proofs There are three different distinctions identified by Aristotle. These are ethos, pathos, and logos. These three proofs are used on daily basis to make effective argumentative writing. According to Professor Jeanne Fahnestock the first one is “Ethos forms the root of ethikas means credibility or ethical appeal, it is simply “the state of being”, the soul, the mind and shapes and forms of a person. In this appeal,” One of the problems of argument is to project an impression to the reader that you are someone worth listening to, in other words making yourself as author into an authority on the subject of the paper, as well as someone who is likable and worthy... ...
See below
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...Aristotle’s Ethics Aristotle’s ethical theory distinguishes itself form theoretical sciences. His theory supports the wellbeing of an individual. Plato and Socrates made the same assumption. According to Aristotle, we should know when to apply certain concept in life in order to have a good life. Acquiring wisdom depends on our deliberate actions, emotions, and social skills. Aristotle argues about the difference about opinions in life. People have different opinions and views concerning something, but we must find a way of resolving the difference. Social contract theory suggests that the goodwill, moral, and political...
Democratic Theorist
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...Aristotle theory on modern democracy The influence of Aristotle theory on modern democracy Democracy is considered as a form of ruling by the government whose policies are determined by its citizens. In a democratic practice, all the citizens are given equal opportunity to express their opinion and among the systems considered to be more democratic in a modern world is the parliamentary system. Besides, democracy may also exist when members of the public directly participates in voting as a way of exercising their decision in a political process (Frank, 2005). Theoretically, Aristotle gave vital differences between the democratic rule by a few individuals and the autocratic form... The influence of...
Ethos, Logos, Pathos
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...Aristotle argues that through ethos, logos, and pathos, speech creators always ensure that they appeal to audience. In a bid to establish a deeper understanding of ethos, logos, and pathos, the following paper uses speech delivered by Martin Luther King, “I have a dream”. Notably, Braet (1992) confirms that Martin Luther King delivered powerful speeches during the ancient time. In his speech “I have a dream”, he stated firmly that all men were created equal despite... Ethos, Logos and Pathos Ethos, Logos and Pathos Braet (1992) asserts that whilst giving speeches, people employ the use of different argumentation theories for the purposes of developing relevant and specific concepts. On this basis,...
Aristotle,nz
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...Aristotle Comparison between Excellence of Character and Excellence of Thought Aristotle defined excellence as the thought of developing, over time, incorruptible values. Aristotle sincerely believed that the achievement of excellence was something that would depend on the individual’s habits. Essentially, a person’s acquisition of virtue was dependent on perfecting his or her mental or psychological reaction to different circumstances. According to Aristotle, in order to attain happiness, human beings would have to achieve excellence of character as well as thought. For Aristotle, the concept of ‘excellence of character’ includes the elements of practical reason as well as emotion... . The...
Plato, Aristotle, Sophism
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...Aristotles four causes. What is his theory of four causes designed to address? How does he employ this theory as the basis for his critique of his predecessors, especially Plato? For Aristotle, a firm understanding of what a cause is, and how many types of causes there are, is significant for successful explanation of the world around us. Aristotle identifies four kinds of things that can be applied in answer to a why-question: a. The material cause, which Aristotle stated that in every change, something gets a new determination first before undergoing any form of change, which is in potency to a new... Q1. Explain the various points Plato is making in the Allegory of the Cave. Why does he tell this...
Rhetorical Appeals
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...Aristotle, who suggested that a reader can be persuaded by inclusion of three key elements i.e., ethos, pathos and logos. Ethos refers to use of ethics and ethical reasoning used to convince the readers; pathos refers to use of emotional appeals and examples; and logos refers to the use of logic to support the arguments made (Garver, 1994; Enos & Agnew, 1998; Kaufer & Butler, 1996... Rhetorical Appeals Introduction The art of rhetoric persuasive writing entails a careful use and arrangement of words, which results in persuading the readers in accepting and endorsing the ideas put forward by the writer. The process of such effective communication was introduced and explained by the Greek philosopher -...
Rhetoric
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...Aristotle’s Rhetoric Aristotle defines rhetoric as the use of language to persuade an audience by appealing to their emotions. Artists have used Aristotle’s concept of rhetoric to develop literature that are not only relevant to the target audience but also impacts the audience by obtaining their interests in both the concepts of the article and the narration technique. Writing as Aristotle explains is purposeful, the author must develop an article that is likely to gain a direct relevance from the target audience. To achieve this, Aristotle propagates the artistic use of language in order to earn an...
Aristotle and the Appeal to Reason,the author refers to topos
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...Aristotle and the Appeal to Reason “Aristotle and the Appeal to Reason” is a very beneficial chapter that describes the Aristotelian Rhetorical concept of “topos”. This particular discussion of topos and many other important logical topics have enriched the book “To the Point: Reading and Writing Short Arguments”. There are myriad of interpretations regarding the term “topos” used by Aristotle. There is no second opinion regarding the issue that Aristotle’s rhetoric bears much more heterogeneous character in terms of its topic. Topos or “topoi” in classical terminology stands for different sources from where the...
Ancient and MEdieval Political Theory
2 pages (500 words) , Essay
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...Aristotle’s Virtue or Nicomachean ethics has never been more relevant than today where the world is reduced to tinder box because of the many conflicts that beset us. Particularly is the recent conflict in Iraq and Syria where an extremist group ISIS or ISIL is terrorizing everybody with murder, beheading and rape with anyone who disagrees with them. Both Muslims and non-Muslims are threatened by their ideological extremism that even the terrorist group Al Qaeda distanced itself from them due to its wanton disregard to human life and dignity (____). If only ISIS knew Nicomachean Ethics, it may have reexamined its ideological approach... Teacher Interpreting the world according to Nicomachean Ethics...
PHI201 MOD 2 CA
4 pages (1000 words) , Essay
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...Aristotle’s Theory concerning Moral Responsibility According to Aristotle’s theory concerning moral responsibility, thereis neither hard nor fast rule for ascertaining whether a person who has acted due to coercion is blameworthy. Coerced acts tend to be strictly voluntary; therefore, they never get automatic disqualification from responsibility (Echeñique 14). Thus, responsibility is dependent on facts concerning the situation, for instance the gravity of the threat, along with the temperament of the coerced act. Aristotle believes that every human being has a responsibility for his or her actions, something that makes others reasonably praise, blame or even punish him or her; he shows... ...
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