The Voting of Many But Not All

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In an age where the world is constantly changing, citizens look to their elected officials to act as the voice of reason in the world. Unlike other countries that still have a monarchy system, the US takes part in a democracy in which there is an elected congressional body, as well as a "head of state", or more commonly known as the President of the United States.


After 9/11, the United States found itself at that point more than ever needing the elected officials in Washington to come together and work towards protecting the needs of the citizens at a time of the greatest uncertainty. With that being said, when it comes down for election time, the levels at which people come out and vote are not still at maximum capacity. As this is an election year, the statistics for this year will not be available until later on, but with all things considered, 2008 is appearing to be a year of stronger voting numbers. The question is how come voting numbers in recent elections have not been as strong as they may be now
According to the US Census report from March 2006 in regards to the voting numbers for the 2004 general election, "In the Presidential election of November 2004, the sixty-four percent of voting-age citizens who voted was higher than the sixty percent who turned out in 2000. This was the highest turnout in a presidential election year since 1992, when sixty-eight percent of voting age citizens voted. The overall number of people who voted in the November 2004 election was 126 million, a record high for a presidential election year," Adding that, "Voter turnout increased by 15 million voters from the election in 2000. ...
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