Does war give the right to kill The study of the character of Elisha in Dawn by Elie Wiesel

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There are many instances throughout Dawn where the transgressions f the terrorists are justified by themselves as being an act f war. On one such occasion we read f a situation where Elisha is wrestling with the fact that he must execute an unarmed hostage the following morning.


Another friend, and fellow terrorist, Ilana approaches Gad to comfort him. She states, "Don't torture yourself, Gad. This is war" (151). In both f these instances we see the members f this terrorist cell justifying their actions, and their opponents for the matter, as being a mere act f war. Thus, this leads us to an undeniable question: are actions f violence, terrorism for that matter, justifiable in a state f war
On the side f the terrorists, yes, using unfair and excessively violent tactics are quite acceptable. Acceptable to the point where basically anything goes, despite who is affected; be they military personnel or innocent civilians just trying to make their way in the world. Its war, pain and simple. However, on the opposite end f the spectrum, namely that f civilized nations, we find that there are certain rules to war, or a code f conduct if you will. Killing an unarmed man because you were given the orders to is not war, especially if the victim knows not why they are being executed. Weisel shows us a situation in Dawn where Elisha is a few seconds to snuffing the life out f John Dawson, the terrorist's captive. John Dawson says, "I'm smiling because all f a sudden it has occurred to me that I don't know why I am dying. Do you" (203). Clearly Elisha and John Dawson had no concrete idea as to why John Dawson was to be killed. ...
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