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Jazz History George Gershwin - Essay Example

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Undergraduate
Essay
Miscellaneous
Pages 3 (753 words)

Summary

Much can be said about the artist George Gershwin. It is through his works that Jazz has found its way into mainstream music. His expressions have managed to influence many famous musicians. This report will shed some light on the biography and the influential work of this extraordinary personality.

Extract of sample
Jazz History George Gershwin

He started his musical training at the age of 13, and was so enthusiastic about it that he dropped out of the school at the age of 15 to work at Tin Pan Alley, a music publishing firm owned by Jerome H. Remick. "Since I found you" and "Raggin' the Traumeri" were the first two songs that George tried to publish but wasn't so lucky. Later on, he was able to get his song "When you want 'em you can't get 'em when you've got 'em you can't get 'em" published but wasn't able to make much impression on the public. First real fame came to him when Al Jolson popularized his song "Swanee" in 1919. Another notable success for him was in 1920, when he was hired to write music for "Scandals". Eventually, George and his elder brother Ira, together, were one of the dominant songwriters of the Broadway.
His works such as, Oh, Kay! (1926), Funny Face (1927), Strike Up the Band (1927 & 30), Girl Crazy (1930) and Of Thee I Sing (1931) are one of the few that are worth mentioning. But his most outstanding work was "Rhapsody in Blue" for Paul Whitman Orchestra which opened a new era in the music by bringing Jazz into mainstream music and established it as a credible music genre. Later on he composed "Concerto in F" for New York Symphony Society, which is also considered one of his wonderful works amongst others such as "An American in Paris" and "Second Rhapsody". ...
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