Got a tricky question? Receive an answer from students like you! Try us!

Independence of Women in Marriage in the Medieval Era - Essay Example

Only on StudentShare
Author : ethelkemmer

Summary

Marriage appears to be the key to continued existence, and this is what Alison, the main character, looks for and discovers in Alison's five marriages. Geoffrey Chaucer displays his talent as a writer with his "Wife of Bath's Prologue" in countless ways. It is simple to just lose ourselves inside the character of the Wife of Bath since she is vibrant and by reading her prologue, we believe as though we nearly knew her…

Extract of sample
Independence of Women in Marriage in the Medieval Era

Furthermore, since a man writes her prologue, we cannot help but think about why he wrote it. This imaginary character gives Chaucer a chance to address several subjects that might have been forbidden during his time. By making use of irony and wittiness, Chaucer is able to construct statements regarding women and how they are dealt with. It is ought to be noted that Chaucer was definitely seeking to embody a woman's voice. Actually, by creating the Wife of Bath, we can presume he wanted to produce a memorable personality in her.
In her Prologue as part of "The Canterbury Tales" by Geoffrey Chaucer, The Wife of Bath offers readers a complex portrait of a medieval woman. On the one hand, The Wife of Bath is shameless about her sexual exploits and the way she uses sexual power to obtain what she wishes. Alternatively, by doing precisely these things she is bearing out unconstructive stereotypes regarding women and showing that women are manipulative and deceiving. Although her performances might at first appear to be uprising against the male-dominated culture in The Canterbury Tales, and more commonly, the medieval era for women, there is very slight that she does that is in fact revolutionary or making powerful women of her time.
Based even just on her introduction in "The Canterbury Ta ...
Download paper

Related Essays

Muslim Women in Medieval Spain
The first three hundred years of the Muslim conquest gave Spain a unique character among west European countries. Save for the Pyrenean regions and the territory to the north of the River Duero, the entire land mass was subjected by and received the imprint of Islamic civilization. Three centuries of virtually undisputed Muslim rule gave Spain its indelibly Moorish characteristics (Mann 12). Spain's Moorish past is so readily accepted by the modern traveler that it requires some effort to grasp the scale of the revolution that over, took the peninsula. A wholly foreign race professing a…
10 pages (2510 words)
Independence vs. Commintment (Men and Women)
There are a number of researches showing that this is not really the case. In fact, these researches show that there is no difference between the predisposition of men and women to be committed. Most men just like the most ordinary women, desire to be in a healthy, happy relationship. However, the difference is in the fact that men face various societal and legal barriers, and/or penalties that women do not. These barriers are the key reasons why most men tend avoid commitments first (Rudov, 2004). They are still fixing up these barriers so that when they feel ready to commit themselves,…
2 pages (502 words)
Women in Medieval Europe
Almost all spinning was done by women.…
3 pages (753 words)
Humanism and religion in the Medieval Era
Each person's life can be viewed as a unique story in a theatrical play.A play which shows how diverse people can be, their roles, cultures, social expectations, course of actions, pains and obstacles as well as the degree of spiritual needs and philosophies in life that can go far beyond to reach one’s fulfillment or humanism. Humanism is a philosophy of joyful service for the benefit of all humanity; methods of reason, democracy and science are advocated in this service. It often connotes for one’s devotion to the interests of individuals and society, wherever they are and whatever their…
2 pages (502 words)
Women in the Struggle for America's Independence
She continues this by pointing and discussing in detail the involvement of the women in the boycotts and protests that occurred before the Revolution, their harrowing experiences that they came across during the war that stretched the boundaries of the war from the battlefields to the home fronts and also on both sides the saboteurs and exploitation done by the female spies. Stories of loyalist exiles are dealt with in separate chapters, which include of the African American and the Native American women, these were the groups for the Revolution provided very few opportunities and created…
5 pages (1255 words)