Metabolic Syndrome and its implications ( tentative)

Metabolic Syndrome and its implications ( tentative) Term Paper example
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Metabolic syndrome Name Instructor Class 10 July 2011 Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic syndrome (MetS and once called as “syndrome X or insulin-resistance syndrome”) is illustrated by “central obesity, dyslipidaemia and hypertension” (O'Sullivan et al., 2010, p.770).


This paper examines the associated pathophysiology and relative impacts of MetS. Associated Pathophysiology People affected with central obesity often have metabolic syndrome, which can also lead to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (Appel et al., 2004, p.335). “Generalized obesity” means having a weight that is higher than the ideal weight and with the extra weight distrubuted all over the body (Das, 2010, p.5). Appel et al (2004) reviewed literature and used diagnostic criteria to study the common manifestations of this syndrome. Findings showed that generalized obesity that is part of metabolic syndrome can be a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (Appel et al., 2004, p.335). Some studies showed, however, that not only the obese are prone to developing metabolic syndrome. Reaven (1988) proposed the concept of metabolic clustering, where there is a pathophysiological concept that related insulin resistance to metabolic problems, even among non-overweight individuals with average glucose tolerance (Carroll, Borkoles, & Polman, 2007, p.125). Das (2010) noted that the risk factors of metabolic syndrome are insulin resistance, obese abdomen, lack of physical activity, aging, hormonal problems, and ethnic or genetic predisposition (p.5). In an original article, O'Sullivan et al. ...
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