Implanting a CHIP on Every US Citizen: We Can, But Should We? - Essay Example

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Implanting a CHIP on Every US Citizen: We Can, But Should We?

Versel (2009) has pointed out that even Dr. John Halamka, (CIO of Harvard Medical School) “has officially given up on the idea that people will want to carry their medical records on implanted RFID chips. Halamka had a chip implanted in 2004, but doesn't think the public will ever widely accept the technology” (Versel, 2009). This paper analyses the whether it is ethically right or wrong to ask all the public to implant an RFID chip. As per the new health care bill signed recently, “the government will give everybody a health ID card that contains a machine readable device (magnetic strip or RFID chip) similar to a credit card. Embedded in this chip or strip is your Health Identification Number” (Charrington, 2011). It is easy for the government to provide medical assistance to all the people instantly instead of asking the people to submit papers for insurance claims or medical claims. Hospitals will be paid instantly after the processing of medical claims of the patient. Since the patient’s bank account details are enclosed in the RFID chip, it is easy for the hospitals to collect the balance amount from patient’s personal account. RFID chips have the ability to store all the necessary information a doctor wants to know about a patient so that the treatment procedures could be easily determined. ...
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Implanting a CHIP on Every US Citizen: We Can, But Should We? Implanting a CHIP on Every US Citizen: We Can, But Should We? “According to the language in the new health care bill, it will be required for all American citizens to be implanted with an RFID chip” (Health Care Bill Required RFID implanted chip, 2010)…
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