The Color of Water and Being Human

High school
Book Report/Review
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The book The Color of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother, by James Mc Bride, shows how a human being's identity does not and should not depend on race; we are all citizens of the same planet. Race should play only a small part in defining who we are…

Introduction

Growing up the way James did, with a Polish mother and an African-American father, was no different from the childhood of many others who come from a family where the father is one race and the mother is another. Granted, we are the product of our parents up to a certain extent, and should not ignore the heritage and the values they bring to our "self", but not to the point where we must know every nuance of our father's or mother's person in order to define ourselves. We are each our own world, and the contribution made to that world by our parents is basically one of example, whether it be as role models, representatives of a certain culture, likes and dislikes, values, whatever. Ultimately, these are more important to and more influential on us than the question of race.
James Mc Bride's parents were upstanding citizens who instilled values in their children, which contributed much more to who they became than their race. For example, James parents sustained that "[...] money without knowledge was worthless, that education tempered with religion was the way to climb out of poverty in America [...] (29). They were right, ultimately because money without knowledge, education or faith in God can lead to greed, corruption, and many other negative things, merely because the person in whose hands it is does not have the sense of responsibility that comes from having moral values.
"Being mixed is ...
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