Anita Pachecos Royalism and honor in Aphra Behns Oroonoko - Book Report/Review Example

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Anita Pachecos Royalism and honor in Aphra Behns Oroonoko

The review begins with a clearly stated objective of exploring the main points of Pacheco's essay and analysing its strengths and weaknesses; however, proceeds to describe Pacheco's arguments and illustrations that suggest Behn's hero as 'Eurocentric' and 'royalist.' A significant portion of the review is spent on summarising Pacheco's viewpoints, and presents little attempt to analyse or interpret Pacheco's observation in the backdrop of her thesis or the primary text. At many places like when describing Pacheco's comments on 'Europeanizing the African' and Behn's approach to slavery, the reviewer simply repeats Pacheco's words as in a simple narration of the article, without quoting the author, or interpreting the implications of Pacheco's observations. The review is totally oblivious of Pacheco's commentary on Oroonoko's treatment of honour and its instability within the upper-class/royalist discourse due to the religious implications, which according to her eventually leads to the undermining of the novel's royalist ideology. ...
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Summary

The critical review of Anita Pacheco's 'Royalism and honor in Aphra Behn's Oroonoko' clearly identifies the central thesis - "that the ideology of [Oroonoko] is royalist and also that its effort at 'ideological closure' is undermined by its continuity with the historical period and by its reliance on an unstable discourse of honor" - made by Pacheco in her essay; however, fails to examine or evaluate the contents of the text in full vis-vis her thesis to understand or guide the prospective readers as to how Pacheco fares in establishing her thesis…
Author : magali08

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