Food Translation

Masters
Essay
Miscellaneous
Pages 16 (4016 words)
Download 0
Globalisation, the growth in trade and commerce amongst nations and peoples, has resulted in prosperity, mobility, and uniform standards and expectations, all made possible because of advances in human communication and information technology (Micklethwait & Wooldridge, 2000).

Introduction


This paper on recipe and menu translation begins with discussing why translation is both a science and art, and the principal issues of subjectivity in translation and interpretation, foreignisation-domestication and visibility-invisibility.
Before writing was invented, human communication was done using words or sounds. Basic communication became possible amongst people because of "language", a set of symbols that follow rules of syntax and semantics shared by those with a common cultural identity.
Language as an integral part of culture is a means to express a message and define the cultural identity of the message source along with non-verbal conventions, norms, and rules of conduct to which group members conform by virtue of their upbringing or any other process of socialisation (Snell-Hornby, 1999, 103).
Language development gives translation its important role: by allowing one culture to communicate with another, translation improves the way cultures understand and influence each other. That, at least, is the theory.
The practice is complex and challenging because in translating from one language to another, it is not easy to capture precisely different cultural identities and make the ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related papers

Translation Studies
With the advent of television, dubbing of TV programs also became popular, so that by the late 1970s, most major European and Latin American markets were watching television and cinema productions made in Hollywood in their local languages. Today, in Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and Turkey-and increasingly in the major East European nations-audiences see Hollywood…
7 pages (1757 words)
Translation as a normgoverned activity
There was a time when translation was perceived as a secondary activity, it was more likely to be understood as a 'mechanical' process rather than a 'creative' process, with a common perception that any layman can handle it. Gideon Toury presented a unique and new approach to reassess translation research in the 1980s until the translation studies was dominated by the systemic approach pioneered…
15 pages (3765 words)
Film "Lost in Translation"
In fact, the movie clearly traffics in stereotypes, but it does depart from the Hollywood's tradition of Orientalism. However, in the narration film, there is not much complexity as According to several critics, Sofia Coppola’s Oscar-winning film Lost in Translation seems to depict the Japanese culture in an American way and there is essential distortion to several aspects of the modern Japanese…
4 pages (1004 words)
Use of neologisms in legal translation
Use of neologism is necessary in the global legal discourse as translation of legal terms from one original language necessitated for use in another target language could spell the interpretation of legal practitioners, as well as judgment of juries or judges. Likewise, these established legal concepts are not always, if at all, shared by other countries or nations and states of which target…
8 pages (2008 words)
Professional Translation
This framed Nida's dynamic equivalence which is understanding not only the meaning of the source text but also the manner in which the intended receptors of a text are likely to understand it in the receptor language (Tianmin). In other words, Nida is more concerned in how the receptors would understand or digest the intended message of the original text. Nida has been into biblical translations.…
4 pages (1004 words)
Fitzgeralds Translation of Omar Khayyam
The best part of his poems was composed during his youth in the quiet and beautiful landscape of Nishpur. The translated version of his famous Rubaiyat (Quatrains) was first published by Edward Fitzgerald in 1859, which made him famous throughout the Western world. "If the mood expressed in the famous Quatrains", says Gibbs, "is not the most heroic or exalted, none-the-less they caught the exact…
42 pages (10542 words)