Thomas Paine's "Common Sense"

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One person's writing can inspire many others. Throughout the course of history, a myriad of words have been written upon a myriad of pages of paper, all words that, once read, have left an impact on the reader. Some of these words are so great, and so inspiring that they can in fact shape the course of history…

Introduction

Unrest that, until Paine so aptly laid the blame directly on George III, had no real enemy. Paine's publishing of Common Sense stirred the colonies to action, and helped ignite them in "first successful anti-colonial action in modern history".1 His words spoke to that generation, and arose outrage against the colonial government that had not been seen previous to the publishing of his works.
While the colonies were struggling with the question of whom exactly to blame for their problems, and what exactly to do about it, Paine decided he had the answers. The anti-colonial feelings were already there, no mistake should be made that Paine himself created that feeling. The anger was already there; just the colonies were not exactly sure what they were angry at yet. Paine gave them his answer that the entire problem spewed from one sole source, the current King of England, George III. The sticks and branches for the fire had been there for some time, it was Paine's fiery words that ignited the colonist to action.
Paine's writings also help give us a look into the feelings of the time. Paine was a "journalist and essayist, contributing articles on all subjects to The Pennsylvania Magazine"1, and a good candidate for historians to look at. He knew what was going on. Working at the newspaper, he has ideas, and also had a great way to transfer those ideas to a mass market. ...
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