Federalists and the AntiFederalists

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After the end of the revolutionary war, the Americans were free from British control, so they wanted to build their own governmental system, where the central government had no control over the states. This gave the states complete power which led to them not respecting other countries.


The final Constitution had to be approved and ratified or approved by the each state. The making of the Constitution led to the division of the American people into two groups, the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists.
The Federalists believed that the creation of a Constitution was the only way a just society could be established. They believed that not all the power should be given to the legislature unless it was written down as this would ensure no mistreatment of power. They centered their arguments on the incapability's of the national government based on the Article of Confederation and stressed on the benefits of a government based on the Constitution. They also believed that a strong central government would help in the commercial growth of the country. "Federalists tended to associate local, face-to-face politics with momentary passion and short-sightedness, while associating a broader, more refined view of the public interest with national representatives" (Ellis, 1996, p. 64). The Federalists had a pluralistic view of the society, they believed in a society that had many different and competing groups, and no group would dominate the other. Two noted leaders of the Federalists were Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, who helped create the constitution.
The Anti-Federalists obviously had a different view. ...
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