Martin Luther King's Speech

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Book Report/Review
Miscellaneous
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Whether you are constructing an effective argument or baking a cake, you need to start with good ingredients. The ingredients that go into writing a solid argument are the rhetorical devices that the writer uses to convey imagery and emotion. These include the metaphors, euphemisms, and similes that bring the writing to life and give it an added dimension…

Introduction

Martin Luther King's I Have a Dream speech is rich with rhetorical devices and nearly void of fallacies and bias.
The speech begins with King using a simile when he says the Emancipation Proclamation came as "a joyous daybreak". He employs a metaphor when he warns against seeking to "satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred". Simile is again used when he speaks of justice that "rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream". His use of similes and metaphors added power to his words. In a later paragraph he uses parallelism to invoke a sense of importance when he repeats the phrase "Now is not the time" to open three consecutive sentences. His closing statements that all begin with "Let freedom ring" again uses parallelism to highlight the importance of the message and makes the passage more memorable. .
While King's words gained power through his appropriate and effective use of rhetorical devices, they were not overly subjected to the distractions of false arguments or bias. He begins one paragraph with the statement that "It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment and to underestimate the determination of the Negro". This was an appeal to the emotions that is based in fear and is known as a scare tactic. ...
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