Book Analysis "The End of Blackness" by Debra. J Dickson

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The End of Blackness is sturdily researched tale of the development of black identity in America. Dickerson issued a powerful challenge to her fellow blacks "to shoulder the adult's full responsibility as a member of the polity." "Crime is crime," she writes.


(Jayne O. Ifekwunigwe, 2004)
The notion of "blackness" has to be refurbished if black Americans are to countenance the future with confidence. For too long, the writer argues, blacks have tried to mangle shame and get endorsement from whites, when they ought to be striving for black excellence despite of white opinion. If you think you know what comes after that a request for blacks to drag themselves up by their boot-straps and totally join in mainstream American society - you're right, fairly. Even though Debra Dickson gives emphasis to black accountability and intra-community black fortify, her endeavor is not to disembowel fellow blacks for their supposed failings. Nor does she allow whites off the hook. Their racism against blacks, she assert, "has been defined out of existence and repackaged so that whites retain its perks. It has undergone existential plastic surgery." Therefore, she concludes, "many whites believe that nonwhites have no right to criticize them since whites are superior and alone responsible for the success of America." (Jayne O. Ifekwunigwe, 2004)
For more or less anyone recognized with any kind of political ideology, Dickerson's analysis is a sour pill to swallow. Sorry to say, the book tops out at just that. ...
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