Got a tricky question? Receive an answer from students like you! Try us!

How does stigma and discrimation hinder recovery of patients with schizophrenia. - Essay Example

Only on StudentShare
Masters
Essay
Nursing
Pages 7 (1757 words)

Summary

How does Stigma and Discrimination hinder Recovery of Patients with Schizophrenia? Abstract Title: How does Stigma and Discrimination Hinder Recovery of Patients with Schizophrenia? Background: A lot of attention was put on anxiety and depression but the health care sector seemed to forget about some extremely intense mental conditions like schizophrenia Key words: stigma, discrimination, schizophrenia, recovery, and mental illness…

Extract of sample
How does stigma and discrimation hinder recovery of patients with schizophrenia.

Research Method: Qualitative research will be done on this study and a thematic approach will be used as the study seeks to examine, investigate, locate and record patterns. A survey will be conducted. Sample: Non probability sampling method. A total of 60 sample units will be used, 40 being schizophrenic patients and 20 nurses or family members. Data collection: Interviews and focus groups will be used as tool of data collection. Data analysis: Data analysis will be conducted through SPSS software and the Burnard model of coding, which provides a model for data organisation. Findings and Result: Stigma and discrimination were observed to affect the schizophrenic patients through hindering recovery and even exacerbating the illness. Conclusion: Without the stigma and discrimination, schizophrenic people would recover fast and easily thus contributing to the society. The stigma and discrimination that follows a person after being diagnosed with schizophrenia is usually what leads them to an early grave. ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related Essays

Schizophrenia
Schizophrenia in general as a disorder has a peculiar symptom, namely that the affected person may hear sounds that surrounding people don’t hear. They have a curious feeling that other people are trying to read their minds or in other words are gaining control of their thoughts. They are superstitious enough to harm themselves as well. This can frighten people with the illness and exclude them from the society because of extreme agitation. This brain disorder is considered to be costly and time consuming due to the behavior of the patient. Superstitions are common feelings of the patient…
12 pages (3012 words)
Stigma, Adaptation, and Recovery: a Textual Representation of Mental Illness
Of course, with the advent of this writing, judgments have been made with regard to the way audiences and/or readers might respond to such differing representations. This report reflects common attitudes reflected in the literature and media which are going to be discussed. With regard to stigma, an extensive, intensive look will be taken at the issues in discrimination that the mentally ill population faces. Not only that, but we will also examine how important it is for the mentally ill to adapt to their challenges as seen in some ways represented in media. Finally, recovery will be…
8 pages (2008 words)
Scholarly paper schizophrenia
A holistic approach has to be adopted in the treatment of this condition. Although schizophrenia cannot be cured, its symptoms can be considerably mitigated by medication with antipsychotic drugs. To a significant extent, this condition is genetic. However, it is also caused by stress, abuse of drugs and trauma. Schizophrenia Introduction This work deals with the disorder of schizophrenia and the methods of dealing with the problem. Initially, clinical features of the disease were taken up for a discussion. Subsequently, implications of the disorder were discussed. Moreover, the…
9 pages (2259 words)
Consumers' experiences of stigma
The same research also found out that at least 450 million people in the world suffer from mental health problems (Thompson and Thompson 1997, p.6). Another research also established that at least one in every 12 people suffer from depressive disorders. Like any other disease, a majority of those suffering from mental health disorders are capable of recovering fully when subjected to the right treatment and management and live a normal life like any other person. However, this is only possible when such people are helped at early stages. However, since people with mental illnesses cannot make…
8 pages (2008 words)
Does Induce Therapeutic Hypothermia Impact Neurologic Function And Improve Patients Out?
This study adds up to the many other studies that have been conducted on the role played by hypothermia in dealing with neurologic conditions and has been used in updating cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines and its findings used as recommendations for hypothermia in neurologic conditions especially patients suffering from cardiac arrest and don’t regain consciousness. The findings can also be used in the implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in patients suffering from pulseless electrical activity, asystole and in house cardiac arrest cases. The results can be used to guide and…
13 pages (3263 words)
Does induce Therapeutic Hypothermia Impact Neurologic Function and Improve Patients Outcome post cardiac arrest
Cardiac arrest is one of the medical conditions, which are known to result into low or insufficient blood flow into the body of a patient. The process of executing therapeutic hypothermia on patients involves the use of a catheter, which is placed in the inferior vena cava through the femoral veins in the legs through a method known as invasive therapeutic hypothermia. Non-invasive therapeutic hypothermia involves an external application of a blanket that is made extremely cold by water. Strict adherence to the therapeutic hypothermia has been proved to reduce the level of risks for ischemic…
15 pages (3765 words)
Describe how one's emotional intelligence (EI) level can either enhance or hinder effective leadership in the health care envi
The notion of emotional intelligence is based on one’s ability to understand and comprehend his or her emotions whereas he or she should also have a fair bit of idea about others’ emotional state as well. Furthermore, the concept and the most important construct in healthcare cannot be practiced without building social linkages with patients (Salovey & Mayer, 1989). The application of emotional intelligence is reduced to the responsibility of medics to provide adequate level of motivation to the patients so that their recovery process can be expedited. The physiological illnesses are…
3 pages (753 words)