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Assessment and Recovery from Mental Distress - Essay Example

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Assessment and Recovery from Mental Distress: Appraising the concepts of ‘Recovery’ Introduction Mental distress is one of the least understood cases or situations where an individual himself or herself feel so helpless about his/her feelings. What makes it worse is the understanding of others about the situation…

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Assessment and Recovery from Mental Distress

The common causes of mental illness and distress are chemical imbalances in the brain, stress and everyday problems, and exposure to severely distressing experiences such as loss of a relationship, job, death of a family member, sexual assault, killings, and violence, among others. However, some mental health experts claim that mental illness can also be inherited. There are different types of mental distress: anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, manic depressive distress, borderline personality disorder, schizophrenia, and many more depending on gravity and description. People who suffered from these distresses were seen with various symptoms. The person could experience upset, feeling restless, sleeplessness, tremors, nightmares, extreme sadness or despair, loss of interest in doing anything, loss of appetite, irritability, impulsiveness, depression, inability to perform daily tasks, hopelessness, sense of guilt, extreme mood swings, feeling worthless, sense of guilt, extreme mood swings, violence, and suicidal tendencies (Borg and Kristianssen, 2004). Being mentally distressed is difficult. Some even deny they have such illness because of the prejudice and discrimination of people around them. ...
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