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The Themes of The Last Days of Socrates and The Death of Ivan Ilych - Essay Example

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High school
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Philosophy
Pages 3 (753 words)

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Name: Institution: Professor: Date: The Themes of ‘The Last Days of Socrates’ and ‘The Death of Ivan Ilych’ Inevitability of death and immortality of human souls is a major theme evident in ‘The Death of Ivan Ilych’. Ivan struggles with a terminal illness and also struggles with the inevitability of his own death…

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The Themes of The Last Days of Socrates and The Death of Ivan Ilych

Ivan knew very that he was going to die, and this forced him to re-evaluate his life in a painful manner. Ivan also asked questions and tried to hide whenever deaths, sicknesses and recoveries were mentioned in his presence and more so when the sickness resembled his own. Inevitability of death and immortality of human souls is also evident in ‘The Last Days of Socrates. In the novel, Socrates held a dialogue with Phaedo on the nature of the afterlife. Socrates offered supporting arguments on the reasons as to why soul is immortal. Socrates believed that the soul is made up of basic forms, which are eternal and unchanging and that there was a different between soul and body. He was however executed by poison hemlock an indication that death was inevitable since human bodies are mortal while human souls are immortal. Socrates says ‘...anyone who does not know, and cannot prove that the soul is immortal must be afraid, unless he is a fool’ (Plato 170). From the two stories, it is quite evident that the acceptance of death, as well as the recognition of the unpredictable nature of life allows room for peace, joy and confidence at the moment of death. The two stories clearly show how the characters understood of the mortality of human bodies and the immortality of human souls. ...
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