Analyzing Plato's and David Hume's View of Death.

Analyzing Plato
College
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 8 (2008 words)
Download 0
Plato argues in many works that there is 'apriori' knowledge, and in the Phaedo he argues in particular that it was 'reincarnation' that is the cause of it. The notion of prior knowledge is further inferred to have come from a time before this life…

Introduction

The following will break down his argument concerning ‘prior knowledge’ or ‘recollection’. In turn, the philosophy of David Hume will be presented. Concerning death, Hume was famously a non-believer in any type of an afterlife, and famously, when his good friend Adam Smith visited him when he was dying, he just joked about it with him and was quite cheerful [Norton 23]. For Hume, all that exists, is within the 'perceptable' world. Where Plato maintained that we have prior knowledge, Hume argues that any notion of 'continuity' or 'sameness' through time, is a notion not that we are born with, but have been conditioned to have. What might appear to come from beyond the senses, is just the product of conditioning that begins in perception and the perceivable world. To state or argue that we have a priori knowledge, is to necessarily posit this as succinct from the senses. In other words, this is a form of knowledge which can be understood as ‘interacting’ with the senses or perception, but it is also a form of knowledge which is distinct as well. Toward establishing this important distinction, Plato raises the problem with respect to the notion of “equals” and unequal's. However, he arrives at these abstractions through an argument which claims that “learning is recollection” [Plato 73B]. ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related papers

Plato's Dialogues
Eventually, the son is taught the unjust speech which enabled them to get rid of the creditors. However, the son also does not spare his father but gives him a beating due to a disagreement on recitation of poetry and justifies his actions using sophistry. The father gets angry and burns the Thinkery as well as chasing students away for deceiving him. What is then the difference between Socrates…
Plato's View of Immortality
The afterlife has been thought of as the connection between the present life and memories and the life of the being after the physical death. In religious circles, each religion has its own view and belief on these issues. There are those that uphold the belief that life continues into the afterlife and does not end even at death. Persons professing secular beliefs also have views on the afterlife…
Epicurus' View On Death
Epicurus used to be one of the most popular philosophers, whose contribution to the meaning of death was persistently disregarded. According to Epicurus, death is neither pleasant nor painful; therefore, based on this premise, death cannot be bad. Simultaneously, the difficulty interpreting the meaning of badness should not be dismissed and, despite its value, Epicurus’ view cannot guarantee…
David Hume's An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding
On the other hand, Hume tells of ideas as being part of a copy principle from impressions, which means that ideas are derived from impressions and they directly correspond to the impression from which they are derived, to create a complete image of both. This he goes to state that ideas are thoughts, beliefs or memories that are directly connected to our memories, which may not serve as much of a…
Hume's
Nevertheless, if a miracle occurs, we are asked to consider something that is divergent to all other understanding. Hume thus far argues that “miracles must be unique or (almost unique) occurrences otherwise fall within cumulative course of nature despite how rare and extraordinary the activity may be.”Provided with this interpretation of miracles, known desecrations of the decree of nature,…
Perfect City in Plato's view, with the philosophers and guardians and the working class and how they all work together.
It is far from monarchy which a child of king or queen automatically becomes a ruler by birth right. From this this philosophical thought comes the social and economic stratification which are meant to forge social solidarity in the ideal state (Silvermintz 762) In stratifying, Plato did not discriminate people by birth but by capability and will of who should rule and exercise political power…
compare David Hume's ideas
He argues that impressions emanate via human senses, feelings and reactions, and other mental features, they are the active perceptions we have because of hearing, seeing, feeling, loving, hating perceptions craving and ambitions. When we hear, see, feel love, hate, desire or will. Ideas refer to the less active perceptions and reactions we have at the thought and imagination of these sensations,…