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Human Cloning and Its Consequences - Essay Example

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Undergraduate
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 3 (753 words)

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Human Cloning and Its Consequences Word Count: 750 Human cloning is dangerous, profoundly wrong, and has no place in our society. There are several dangers inherent in cloning. Ruth Macklin, an accomplished doctor in the field of biomedicine, claims there are the following problems, to paraphrase: “We're too ignorant to do it right; in any case, we are likely to alter the gene pool for ill; negative eugenics can't possibly work unless carriers are eliminated, but this would soon eliminate the entire species; and some methods of genetic engineering carry grave moral risks of mishaps.”1 For instance, since we don’t really understand how cloning works, we might inadvertently change the gen…

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Human Cloning and Its Consequences

Human cloning is also wrong for other reasons, one of them being that human clones might have their bodies harvested for body parts and/or human organs. Then they would be left for dead. We must remember that every person has a soul and a spirit. People should not be grown like oranges on a tree. There has been talk about, indeed, cloning people in order to harvest their organs for one’s clone. This is not only morally reprehensible, but also ethically wrong. How one could even consider raising a human, only to use the human’s body parts for another human—is almost inconceivable. It is possible, but why would any forward-thinking individual want to do something like that? Not only is it a moral lapse, but it would also be a societal lapse as well. ...
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