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Plato's Reply to Glaucon's First Objection that Justice Is No More than a Compromise - Term Paper Example

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Plato's Reply to Glaucon's First Objection that Justice Is No More than a Compromise

Politicians interpret justice in one way and sociologists and philosophers interpret it in another way. Different religions and different cultures have different views about justice. For example, capital punishment is an accepted way of punishing criminals in some of the most advanced societies like United Sates. However, it is prohibited in many other countries. Buddhists do believe that killing of a person or an animal under any circumstances is an inhuman and injustice act whereas some other communities do believe that killing of enemies of their culture or community is an acceptable act. In short, justice is interpreted in different ways by different people. Plato has argued that justice is no more than compromise as a reply to Glaucon’s first objection. This paper critically analyses the claims of Plato. “For Glaucon, stripping him of everything but his justice simply equates to removing his reputation and all the good things which accrue to him from that. Any good he achieves is another’s good, and why should anyone care about that” (Brown, p.54). Glaucon argued that one of the major consequences of justice is happiness. In other words, granting of justice will make a person happier at the expense of another person. For example, suppose capital punishment is provided to a criminal who brutally raped a female. ...
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Name of author: Plato’s reply to Glaucon’s ?rst objection, that Justice is no more than a Compromise The word "justice" appears in many of the United States' most important documents, including the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Pledge of Allegiance…
Author : prudence84

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