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Health Care Ethics - Essay Example

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Author : jschmeler

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Health care ethics Name Institutional affiliation Tutor Date Health care ethics Ethics has at all times, played an important role in health care management. Analysts argue that without ethics in health care, there is a likelihood that patients will end up having no basis of proper care and protection in the health care systems…

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Health Care Ethics

McWay (2010) argues that, it is the sole responsibility of the health practitioners to ensure that all manner of information that relate to the patients’ background information is concealed. Studies indicate that maintaining confidentiality is one of the best antidotes towards a successful healing process of the client. This is in relation to the fact that, clients feel completely relaxed and secure while disclosing information that relates to their medical predicaments. In cases where clients have had nasty experiences with nurses or any other health practitioners, who disclose their medical conditions, such patients were recorded to conceal crucial information, that would otherwise contribute a great mile towards their healing process. This is an interpretation of great tasks that, health practitioners have to undertake in an attempt not only to safeguard their jobs, but also, to make patients’ healing process trouble-free. This essay shall highlight the importance of safeguarding patients’ information by the health practitioners. The essay shall also attempt to undertake a study on the ethical and legal implications of breaching the terms and conditions of health care ethics, that works on the basis of safeguard of patient’s information. ...
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