Soul and Justice in the works of Plato, Aristotle and Epicurus

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* Dear customer, this writing is intended to serve you merely as a model and/or guide. Therefore please put in your own words/style to make it your own great work. Thanks - from, your writer * Soul and Justice in the Works of Plato, Aristotle, and Epicurus Author name Institution In this paper, we compare and contrast the definitions of soul and justice in the works of Plato, Aristotle, and Epicurus…

Introduction

Plato (428-347 BC) defined the soul’s parts as appetite, spirit, and reason (Plato, trans. 1974). A just society would also have this structure: the productive (worker) class (appetite part of the soul); the protective (warrior) class (spirit part of the soul); and the governing (ruling) class (reason part of the soul). Individual justice would consist of the appetite part of the soul obeying the reason part, with the aid of the spirit part of the soul. Any deviation from this order would result in an unjust individual or society. Justice to Plato meant harmony with each fulfilling his role. Plato’s ideal city was meant as a model for an individual to set up the government of their soul. To Plato, justice is a blessing in itself to the just man. These blessings are many, including a good soul ensuring a fit body and resemblance of the wise and good. Justice is excellence of the soul: a good soul will rule well, live well, and therefore be more blessed and happy than an unjust person. Plato attempts in Book X of “The Republic” to prove the immortality of the soul. He uses the myth of Er, where the soul journeys through incarnations, and there are rewards and punishments after death. ...
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