Socrates, Are You Happy?

Socrates, Are You Happy? Term Paper example
Undergraduate
Term Paper
Philosophy
Pages 6 (1506 words)
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Name Professor Module Date Socrates, Are You Happy? The goodness of a person is contained in their operation and behavior. A moral person reasons and behaves well. Happiness is an activity rooted in the human choice, which is not inherent. Human happiness is dependent on the agility in which they perfect their human powers…

Introduction

Human perfection is thus a product of perfection of the intellect. The following paper discusses the just occasion of Socrates’ view that a morally good person is happier than the morally bad person. This will be followed by a personal philosophical worry related to his justification. DISCUSSION Socrates’ view of the relation between virtues and happiness is that good morals are necessary for the fulfillment of life happiness. He believed that an honest, fair, wise and self controlled individual will merit praise and respect from other people thus contributing to achievement of happiness. Portraying virtuous behaviors towards people does not guarantee moral reciprocity. In such a case, Socrates’ view makes one wonder whether nasty responses to virtuous deeds are an aspect of happiness. Consequently, morally potent people have a tendency of leading a life filled with fun and joyous experiences. In this perspective, happiness emanates from the belief that their actions are for the life betterment and satisfaction. Everything that brings satisfaction is an agent of happiness not unless one is missing out on the different forms of happiness. However, he counters this by suggesting that normal happiness makes one think that they are happy whereas real happiness stems deeply inside the soul. ...
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