Euthyphro by Socrates - Assignment Example

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Euthyphro by Socrates

According to “Eutyphro By Plato” (2011), Plato and Euthyphro start talking about piety when Euthyphro brings up the fact that he is prosecuting his father for the murder of a domestic servant who had, in a state of drunkenness, murdered a field worker (par. 33). Plato was mainly concerned about this because he was about to be indicted with impiety. According to “Eutyphro By Plato” (2011), Plato contended that he was being prosecuted by the state for having corrupted the youth (par. 10). The concept of holiness takes such precedence in this conversation because, at length, Socrates is trying to understand why Euthyphro is bringing a charge of murder against his own father—especially when nowadays, probably what Euthyphro’s father did would be considered manslaughter, but that’s beside the point. The real point is that Socrates draws out this singular question into a lengthy argument about the many and diverse opinions of the Gods—and how they would agree or disagree about certain matters depending upon their respective viewpoints. ...
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EUTHYPHRO Euthyphro by Socrates Word Count: 1,000 I. Introduction Here there are numerous elements that will be expounded upon regarding the piece Euthyphro By Plato, a dialogue between Plato and Euthyphro. However, the most notable pieces of this extrapolation will be the following: how the concept of holiness emerges and why it’s important; Euthyphro’s three definitions and Socrates’s three refutations; Socrates’ goal, how one knows it, and the way one can tell; and finally, what this writer’s personal definition of holiness entails, including an honest Socratic response…
Author : corrine07

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