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Socrates' City - Essay Example

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Socrates' City Course/Number Date Introduction Socrates’ city is an imagination of a utopia which comprises three classes: the rulers (the golden), the auxiliaries (silver) and the commoners (bronze and iron). Education and selective breeding are to be used to keep every person in his/her category…

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Socrates' City

Socrates proposes the issuance of selective education to diffuse this wave. The second wave is the perceived commonality between women and children, which repudiated the place of marriage and family. Socrates proposes selective breeding as the answer to the second wave. The third wave was the burden of making the kings philosophers. Socrates postulates that this problem could be solved by combining selective breeding and education (Simpson, 2006). However, it is clear that these postulations are wrought with a lot of setbacks that stem from the dynamics of real life, as shall be seen forthwith. Whether the City Is Plausible/ Realistic By all reasonable means, the city that Socrates envisions is not realistic. Even the genesis of the city Kallipolis is contrived in Socrates’ imagination. In his imagination, Socrates takes away all the unpleasant realities that characterize normal cities, in order to create a utopia. It is because of being purely a utopia that Socrates’ Kallipolis meets several obstacles or waves (Dobbs, 2004). Secondly, the manner in which Socrates intends to settle the three obstacles (waves) is not tenable in any human society. Socrates creates three classes of people: the aristocrats or rulers, the auxiliaries (the soldiers) and the producers (the commoners). ...
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