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The arguments that Socrates provides of the immortality of the soul in the book "Phaedo" by Plato - Essay Example

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The arguments that Socrates provides of the immortality of the soul in the book "Phaedo" by Plato

Introduction: An expository claim of immortality of the soul upon death 3. Arguments in support of the claim; A. The opposite argument B. The “theoretic argument of recollection” C. The “affinity argument” D. The argument is that relating to “form of life.” 4. Conclusion. Abstract The purpose of this paper is to provide readers with a critical thinking about Socrates’ presupposition of the “morality of the soul.” The paper is premised on the claim that human soul is separated from the body by death and this separation is affected by a philosopher’s practice of death. In discussing the relevancy of this paper four arguments shall be considered as stated by Plato’s phaedo. These include the opposite argument that the soul is divinely eternal as opposed to death, the “theoretical argument of recollection”, the affinity belief and the argument relating to “form of life. This paper reveals Plato’s absurd revelation of the end of a Socrates life but then the Socrates was encouraged with the assurance of life after death. This therefore forms the thesis claim of this paper wherein the author underscores the morality of the soul by looking at the effect of death on the mortal being and the assurance of life by the immortality person. ...
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Topic: The Immortality of the Soul Order: 768341 Name: Professor: Date: Outline Thesis: The soul and the body are different. Upon death, the soul lives as an assurance of life after death predestined by God, the Creator of heaven and earth. This represents two beings; that is, the mortal being and the immortal being…
Author : nmosciski
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