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David Suzuki, The Big Picture- the enviormentalist dilemma - Essay Example

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Author : pwuckert

Summary

Your Name Name of of Professor David Suzuki and Environmentalism David Suzuki’s book, The Big Picture, talks of the need for conserving the planet and the environment that man lives in. it makes clear the need for a co-existence of science and the ecology…

Extract of sample
David Suzuki, The Big Picture- the enviormentalist dilemma

He talks of the different aspects of this problem and the possible defense mechanisms that the planet may have in order to combat the encroachments of technology. For Suzuki, it is also important that one understands the importance of mankind’s position on the planet. The fact that man is one of the many species that exist on this planet is significant for Suzuki. There are several new theories that Suzuki puts forth including the idea that it is necessary for the ecological to be quantified in the economic sense of the term. This would then put a certain amount of pressure on people to create a world where the ecology is valued in terms that are familiar to the current market economy. This then makes us aware of the importance of creating a world where the ecology is not a dispensable commodity but something that provides us with an understanding of man’s relation to his environment and other creatures who have equal rights over the resources of the earth. Suzuki’s main argument is that the ecology needs to be given his due and integrated with the scientific endeavors of man and in the economic framework of the world, without which there would be no sustainable growth in the world in any sector. ...
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