Berkeley's Perception Theory

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Berkeley’s theoretical concept on immaterialism remains under scrutiny years after he conceived it. The famous philosopher put forth the claim that he sought to preserve common sense against cynical challenges.


This may seem dubious for conventional individuals reading his proposition, because he upheld the notion that material items solely exist in minds of individuals that perceive them. The contention arises from the widespread knowledge that common sense involves continued existence of objects even when one fails to perceive them. In simple terms, even though all of an individual’s visual ideas appear, disappear then reappear each time he or she blinks, the person does not presume that each object seen comes out of the blues and disappears again. While a stringent materialist might argue that Berkeley’s assertion is impractical, the philosopher indicates that this is untrue (Berkeley and Robinson 30-41). Berkeley’s main proposal is that existence of objects as seen by an individual does not depend entirely on his or her perception. The philosopher’s principal claim is that material items do not exist without individuals’ perception; he defends this idea by positing that he is not only perceiver. Berkeley further indicates that unless an animate being, with thinking capacity perceives objects or sensible qualities, then these items do not actually exist. For instance, when one closes his or her eyes, the tree he or she currently sees will continue being real as long as other people continue seeing it. According to Berkeley, this difference accurately marks the difference between imaginary and real objects. ...
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