Jean-Paul Sartre

Jean-Paul Sartre Essay example
Undergraduate
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 7 (1757 words)
Download 0
The roots of Jean-Paul Sartre’s Existentialist-Marxist understandings are deeply embedded in the objects of freedom (analytically) and personal struggle (history/personal struggle). It is not only impractical to separate Sartre from his time-period, it is impossible…

Introduction

Dissolution of people’s identities both spiritually and historically were being realized through the tragedies of World War I and World War II. Combining these significant destructions with new perspectives concerning Psychology (through Freud, Jung…), Philosophy found a seemingly different path explaining “who we are” and “what is our purpose” as humans. Sartre was heavily influenced by literature and art and through this media suggested an approach to perceiving the world as it is; ugly, grotesque’, self-absorbed. This movement towards a more realistic or negative view of life differed greatly from the “Hope” offered by Leibnitz, Aquinas and other ‘positivists’. Accordingly, Sartre felt the backlash from “Hopeful-ists” resulting in Sartre’s “Existentialism Is a Humanism” lecture in Paris, France 1944. In “Existentialism Is a Humanism”, Sartre spells out what Existentialism actually is. Sartre says there are two kinds of Existentialist “the Christians...and atheistic existentialists” (Sartre 4) the latter being the group Sartre belongs to. It seems like a curious distinction as the two should, intuitively, be seen in contrast rather than comparable. ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related papers

Sartre, existentialism Assignment
Most people have branded this creator by the name of God. Philosophers like Kant and Descartes have been able to give the example of an artisan that creates a paper knife or a paper cutter and designs it for a specific purpose, in order to meet a specific goal of cutting paper and have copied the same analogy for the purpose of a human being. Thus, God is the creator that has made individuals that…
Satre Nietzsche & Human Nature
Actions of the human beings define their essence and identity. Thus, a self-development of an individual depends on his actions. In case an individual lives in the society and his actions are predetermined and compared with the actions of other people, then there is a direct influence exerted on an individual’s identity. Social actions determine an individual’s essence. This is interpretation…
Existentialism Theories
Individual choices were circumscribed in order to achieve the more egalitarian distribution of goods and services like education and health care. In some contemporary Islamic nations, individual freedom must conform to religious practices. Individual behavior is also restricted by religious belief in Israel on the Jewish Sabbath and religious holidays and in some communities in the United States…
Being and Nothingness: An Analysis of Jean Paul Sartre and Existentialism.
Accordingly, the following brief analysis offer for something of a close examination of the following quote: “All of sudden they existed and then, all of sudden, they no longer existed: … I slumped on the bench, dazed, stunned by that profusion of beings without origin: bloomings, blossomings everywhere, my ears were buzzing with existence, my very flesh was throbbing and opening, abandoning…
Jean-Paul Sartre: Being and Nothingness
Sartre’s anguish is a sub-chapter of ‘being’, which was written explicitly to represent the aspect of existential anguish. Since Sartre’s was significantly existentialist, therefore; he elaborates extensively on human nature and its personality traits (Sartre, 1984). Sartre formulated the dogma of intrinsic human trait, which meant that all the men of the world have similar nature to a…
Existentialism and Humanism
This is what will be discussed in the following.…
Continental Philosophys Search for Balance
"Such absolutizing, he charged, lent itself to generalizations of broad critical scope with respect to the idealistic procedure of hypostatizing the Idea and brought about (as allegorical derivatives from it) certain concrete political and social determinations, such as family, classes, and the state powers.In Marx's view," Hegel's dialectic "was mystifying and alienated inasmuch as Hegel did…